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alauita

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14:21 Mar 25, 2004
Catalan to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - Business/Commerce (general)
Catalan term or phrase: alauita
govern alauita

(refers to Morocco)
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Summary of answers provided
5AlawiSean Lyle
5MoroccanMartin Perazzo
4alawi kingdom of Morocco
Berni Armstrong
3 +1Moroccan government
Patrick Bones
3 -1AlawitesSerge L


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Alawites


Explanation:
"Alawites, unlike Muslims and Christians, believe women do not have souls. "

Sort!

Serge L.


    Reference: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/a21.html
Serge L
Local time: 17:38

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sean Lyle: Alawite is not the appropriate form of the adjective in English because old-fashioned, also suggests religious grouping - it should be Alawi.
3 hrs
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Moroccan


Explanation:
"alauita" is a commonly used adjective in Spain used as an equivalent of "marroquí". In English the term "Alawites" is virtually unknown - if you were to say "the Alawite government" nobody would understand you.

HTH,

Martin

Martin Perazzo
Spain
Local time: 17:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sean Lyle: Moroccan is right, but where is "govern"?
3 hrs
  -> The question is "alauita", not "govern alauita". "Govern" only comes out in the explanation, so I think the proper answer to "alauita" is "Moroccan".
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Moroccan government


Explanation:
But the author of 'govern alauita' may not know that it refers to the royal family. Therefore, using it to describe the government may not be 100% correct. According to Enciclopèdia Catalana's "Hiperdiccionari", 'aluita' refers to a member of a Moroccan dynasty of sharifs. Oxford Superlex gives "Alaouite" (period) or "Moroccan". Nowadays you hear it as a more or less colorful synonym for 'Moroccan'.

Patrick Bones
Spain
Local time: 17:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sean Lyle: For a modern context I agree. They damn well should know, but such is the use of unthinking clichés...has anyone done a Lazaro Carreter for Catalan?
3 hrs
  -> Not that I know of. But I did hear about a massive Catalan grammatical / linguistic reference work about to be published some time back. Like Carreter, its authors had set out to clean up a lot of the sloppiness that has creeped into Catalan.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
alawi kingdom of Morocco


Explanation:
Perhaps your context would allow you to echo the phrase we use for Jordan "The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan". Perhaps "The Halawi Kingdom of Morocco" would be an elgant option, IF the phrase is not referring specifically to the "elected" government of Moroccco.

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Note added at 1 hr 37 mins (2004-03-25 15:58:30 GMT)
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Don\'t know how that \"H\" got there :-)

Berni Armstrong
Local time: 17:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Alawi


Explanation:
Strictly speaking, the term refers to the present dynasty on the throne in Morocco, who have been there since the 17th century, I think. Must be easy enough to look it up on the Web.

Therefore by extension it can be used to refere to the government and then the country, but I think it is still only regularly used here in Spain to refer to the king and his government. A small bet: was the word that went with this, KING??

Got no time now, but try Google with something like:

alawi +dynasty +morocco, or just alawi +morocco.

Alawi is not an uncommon name, and the original (?) alawis were from Syria, near Latakia. As an adjective is means high or celestial, and the root is for being high, climbing, celestial, us used of God.

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Note added at 4 hrs 0 min (2004-03-25 18:21:46 GMT)
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A followup to my over hasty answer:
1

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Note added at 4 hrs 8 mins (2004-03-25 18:29:31 GMT)
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...to continue my follow-up which escaped before I meant it to...

1 Serge got to the English version Alawi(te) before me but I think both his and mine are inappropriate for the context. By the way the form \"Alawite\" is very old-fashioned.

2 Depends where youre text is, but I think Patrick\'s answer is probably the best so far for a general interest text - govern alaoui= Moroccan govt, and for the reasons he gives. Who apart from people with a specific interest in Maghreb affairs really know or want to know about Alawi dynasties.

If you are translating a modern newspaper piece/journalism, then you can\'t assume much background knowledge. However, if this is a book on relations between Spain and Morocco, for example, then it is justifiable to use the term Alawi.

Sean Lyle
Local time: 17:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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