KudoZ home » Czech to English » Art/Literary

chrám i tvrz

English translation: A Cathedral And A Fortress

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Czech term or phrase:Chrám i tvrz
English translation:A Cathedral And A Fortress
Entered by: Dylan Edwards
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:48 Jun 27, 2003
Czech to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Czech term or phrase: chrám i tvrz
Just a phrase I've seen here and there. I'd be grateful for background information: where can I find the source of this phrase?
Sorry if the accent on the a isn't visible - I did key it in.
Dylan Edwards
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:25
A Cathedral And A Fortress
Explanation:
Common learner errors
... In his book Chrám i tvrz (A Cathedral And A Fortress), Pavel Eisner a famous
Czech writer, translator and an excellent philologist wrote that Czechs are ...
www.bohemica.com/czechonline/reference/ czechtrivia/common_learner_errors.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-27 13:03:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://pup.princeton.edu/TOCs/c6273.html
Selected response from:

Elenacb
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:25
Grading comment
Thank you - all answers helpful! (including the comment about the Latin source of the phrase). I didn't know there was an existing translation of the phrase in a published book in English ("The Coast of Bohemia"). Many thanks for the detailed information, especially the references to Pavel Eisner.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +1A Cathedral and a FortressHelena Koutna
5cathedral and citadel
Nicholas Miller
5Both a Temple and a Fortress
Zenny Sadlon
3A Cathedral And A Fortress
Elenacb


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
cathedral and citadel


Explanation:
tvrz has a few possible translations: fortress, fort, stronghold, citadel

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-27 12:52:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This phrase might be in a guide book or history book

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-27 12:54:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It\'s also a book by \'Pavel Eisner\'. See http://www.folklor.cz/eter/

Nicholas Miller
Czech Republic
Local time: 09:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Russ: "Chrám" may be "temple" too, am I right?
6 mins
  -> If it's not a Christian place of worship, yes.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
A Cathedral And A Fortress


Explanation:
Common learner errors
... In his book Chrám i tvrz (A Cathedral And A Fortress), Pavel Eisner a famous
Czech writer, translator and an excellent philologist wrote that Czechs are ...
www.bohemica.com/czechonline/reference/ czechtrivia/common_learner_errors.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-27 13:03:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://pup.princeton.edu/TOCs/c6273.html

Elenacb
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:25
Native speaker of: Native in SlovakSlovak
PRO pts in pair: 44
Grading comment
Thank you - all answers helpful! (including the comment about the Latin source of the phrase). I didn't know there was an existing translation of the phrase in a published book in English ("The Coast of Bohemia"). Many thanks for the detailed information, especially the references to Pavel Eisner.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
A Cathedral and a Fortress


Explanation:
I am not sure whether this is the original source of the phrase, but it was used as a title of a fascinating book about the Czech language by Pavel Eisner. Eisner (1889 - 1958) was a master of the Czech language. He was a prolific translator (for example, he was the first translator to tackle a collection of stories by Leo Rossten about Mr Hyman Kaplan, before a complete collection was famously "transposed" into the Czech language by Antonin Pridal) and an author of essays and books about the Czech language. His books are both practical and amusing, and are a must for anyone interested in the Czech language, both as a language professional and a speaker.


    Reference: http://www.czech-language.cz/fiction/eisner/zivot.html
    Reference: http://www.bohemica.com/czechonline/reference/czechtrivia/co...
Helena Koutna
Local time: 08:25
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Daduč: At the end of the book, there is a prayer wishing that the Czech language be our 'templum in modum arcis' or 'catherdral and fortress'.
17 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Both a Temple and a Fortress


Explanation:
'chrám'= 'temple'
'tvrz' = 'fortified settlement'

A 'cathedral' is a specific type of a Christian temple.

A 'citadel' is involves a city which relates to the Roman concept of citizen and thus is quite more specific and newer, I think, than 'fortified settlement', or 'fortress'.

I think "temple" and "fortress" are more appropriate given the context and ethymology of the the variants.

Temple: 1a. A building dedicated to religious ceremonies or worship. 2. Something regarded as having within it a divine presence. ... 4. A building reserved for a highly valued function: the library, a temple of learning.

ETYMOLOGY: Middle English, from Old English tempel, from Latin templum. See tem- in Appendix I.

II. Form *tem-. 1. Suffixed form *tem-lo-. temple1, temple3; contemplate, from Latin templum, temple, shrine, open place for observation (augury term < “place reserved or cut out”), small piece of timber.

Cathedral: 1. The principal church of a bishop's diocese, containing the episcopal throne. 2. A large, important church. 3. Something that resembles a cathedral, as in grandeur or authority.

ETYMOLOGY: Short for cathedral church, from Middle English cathedral, of a diocese, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cathedrlis, of a bishop's see, from Latin cathedra, chair.

Fortress: A fortified place, especially a large, permanent military stronghold that often includes a town.

ETYMOLOGY: Middle English forteress, from Old French, from Medieval Latin fortalitia, from Latin fortis, strong.

Citadel: 1. A fortress in a commanding position in or near a city. 2. A stronghold or fortified place; a bulwark.

ETYMOLOGY: French citadelle, from Italian cittadella, diminutive of cittŕ, city, from Latin cvits. See city.

City: ETYMOLOGY: Middle English cite, from Old French, from Latin cvits, from cvis, citizen.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-30 02:12:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"the accent on the a isn\'t visible \" - Well, it\'s visible on my computer screen. Perhaps you didn\'t set your View-Encoding to Central European characters in your browser.

Zenny Sadlon
Local time: 02:25
Native speaker of: Native in CzechCzech
PRO pts in pair: 251
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Jul 20, 2012 - Changes made by Dylan Edwards:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/52470">Elenacb's</a> old entry - "Ńhrám i tvrz" » "A Cathedral And A Fortress"


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search