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Potrefená Husa

English translation: If the cap fits, wear it / The Wounded Goose

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Czech term or phrase:Potrefená Husa
English translation:If the cap fits, wear it / The Wounded Goose
Entered by: Pavel Prudký
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09:17 Dec 11, 2008
Czech to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Tourism & Travel
Czech term or phrase: Potrefená Husa
Hallo,
I know it is a restaurant chain in Prague but I need to know what it means. I am translating from German to English and the German says "shot at goose".
Thanks
Gillian
Gillian Searl
Local time: 20:49
If the cap fits (wear it)
Explanation:
I think it shoud be this meaning...

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Note added at 4 mins (2008-12-11 09:21:36 GMT)
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something that you say to tell someone that if they are guilty of something bad, they should accept criticism

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Note added at 15 mins (2008-12-11 09:32:20 GMT)
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My translation is based on the main (if not the only) context possible (folk saying): Potrefená Husa nejvíc kejhá = The person concerned/guilty will disclose herself/himself by raising some comments, objections, confirmations, etc.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-12-11 10:41:55 GMT)
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I translated what it means (as requested), which the translation might not be the best name for a restaurant chain :-))) But who knows, people want to differentiate :-))

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-12-11 13:15:29 GMT)
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If you do not want to use the core meaning in terms of proverb, then I suggest the term The Wounded Goose. The main point of “Potrefená” is that the goose is honking then!! But it says nothing about the real meaning of the saying, which the term comes from..


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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-12-11 13:16:55 GMT)
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see the Wounded Goose hits - many times with Potrefená Husa, searching wordlwide web!!
http://search1.seznam.cz/google?q=Wounded Goose

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Note added at 6 hrs (2008-12-11 15:29:43 GMT)
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I also agree with Daniel as it was my suggestion if the exact meaning of the saying does not fit to the restaurant chain name...

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Note added at 22 hrs (2008-12-12 07:37:17 GMT) Post-grading
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thank you
Selected response from:

Pavel Prudký
Grading comment
Oh boy, this goose was really complicated! I now both understand what it means literally and figuratively. I actually went with "gunned down" (I wish I could divide the points) because it sounds good to attract people into a restaurant.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3If the cap fits (wear it)
Pavel Prudký
4 +2The Gunned-Down Goose
Scott Evan Andrews
4 +1The Wounded Goose
Daniel Kelsall
4"The struck goose squels" >Maria Chmelarova
3Hit goose
Klara Hurkova


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
The Wounded Goose


Explanation:
I would definitely agree with Pavel's suggestion - The Wounded Goose - as being the only standard translation. There are plenty of examples of english reviews of the restaurant with this name. I also lived in Zlin for a few years and used Wounded Goose to refer to the place, I think it has a very pleasing assonance!


    Reference: http://www.think.cz/eats/potrefenahusauk.html
    Reference: http://www.cbw.cz/en/wounded-goose-goes-golden-/4083.html
Daniel Kelsall
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in CzechCzech, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pavel Prudký: yes, this is my suggestion one hour earlier, providing they do not want to have the core meaning of the folk saying in the restaurant name
1 hr
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Hit goose


Explanation:
This sounds a bit strange, I know, but the idiom goes "Potrefena husa se vzdycky ozve" or suchlike, which literary means "The (shot at and) hit goose always shouts." I was wondering whether there was a similiar proverb in English, but the closest meaning really seems to be the suggested. "If the cap fits, wear it" (although it is not quite the same). I compared it with German where the idiom goes: "Getroffene Hunde bellen/jaulen" (The hit dogs bark/ howl). Meaning: If someone protests very loudly against criticism, then probably the criticism has hit the nail on the head.



Klara Hurkova
Local time: 21:49
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in CzechCzech
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"The struck goose squels" >


Explanation:
also in Slovak l. " Trafená hus zagága" > it means > a person with a guilty conscience who unwillingly (proti svojej vôli) speaks out > imagine your boss discovered someone used his computer to surf naughty web site. He walks in and says, "who used my computer yeasterday'? and you blurt out, " I don't even like computer porn".
http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/129/
the point here is your reaction is unwilling as instinct ...

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 15:49
Works in field
Native speaker of: Slovak
PRO pts in category: 4
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
If the cap fits (wear it)


Explanation:
I think it shoud be this meaning...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2008-12-11 09:21:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

something that you say to tell someone that if they are guilty of something bad, they should accept criticism

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2008-12-11 09:32:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

My translation is based on the main (if not the only) context possible (folk saying): Potrefená Husa nejvíc kejhá = The person concerned/guilty will disclose herself/himself by raising some comments, objections, confirmations, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-12-11 10:41:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I translated what it means (as requested), which the translation might not be the best name for a restaurant chain :-))) But who knows, people want to differentiate :-))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-12-11 13:15:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you do not want to use the core meaning in terms of proverb, then I suggest the term The Wounded Goose. The main point of “Potrefená” is that the goose is honking then!! But it says nothing about the real meaning of the saying, which the term comes from..


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-12-11 13:16:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

see the Wounded Goose hits - many times with Potrefená Husa, searching wordlwide web!!
http://search1.seznam.cz/google?q=Wounded Goose

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-12-11 15:29:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I also agree with Daniel as it was my suggestion if the exact meaning of the saying does not fit to the restaurant chain name...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2008-12-12 07:37:17 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

thank you

Pavel Prudký
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in CzechCzech
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Oh boy, this goose was really complicated! I now both understand what it means literally and figuratively. I actually went with "gunned down" (I wish I could divide the points) because it sounds good to attract people into a restaurant.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gerry Vickers: I agree with this one as well
3 hrs
  -> thnx

agree  Jennifer Gordon: I agree with Wounded Goose. The description of the idiom brings to mind the somewhat less salubrious "He who smelt it, dealt it!"
6 hrs
  -> right, thank you!

agree  Igor Liba: I agree; Gillian wants to understand not to translate ;-) This is good explan.
8 hrs
  -> děkuji
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The Gunned-Down Goose


Explanation:
Well, I know this place, we've got one in Zlin, pretty nice place actually and expensive...good beer.
I'd suggest this as at least something that's a relatively interesting title. But actually my first step would be to contact the company and see if they'be already got something they've used in English. :)

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Note added at 45 mins (2008-12-11 10:02:14 GMT)
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potrefeny would be an adjective from the verb trefit, to hit (a target) in this case as in ex. skeet, or in particularly bad circumstances of this goose...poor bugger's been shot.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-12-11 12:39:17 GMT)
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I like Pavel's reminding of the idiomatic phrase. Now it's really a question of conveying meaning I think, and a sign on a door can't do that. Maybe the owner/manager should pick up something we do in good establishments the USA. Introduce himself to every new table and welcome them, perhaps explaining to them the meaning behind the name. The intrigue of the name is an opportunity to build the business.

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Note added at 1 day20 mins (2008-12-12 09:37:46 GMT) Post-grading
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Hey, I think we developed a healthy debate in the proper Kudoz spirit. Thanks! I know I learned something from it.

Scott Evan Andrews
Local time: 21:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Blanka Salkova: good idea (to contact the company)
6 mins

agree  Gerry Vickers: agree because that's what it literally means
2 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Dec 12, 2008 - Changes made by Pavel Prudký:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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