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saskia

English translation: Toelichting

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09:57 Jul 3, 2002
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Dutch term or phrase: saskia
I am interested in the etymology/source of this Dutch first name.
somyon
Local time: 01:26
English translation:Toelichting
Explanation:
Stilius and Evert are both right.

All information below from the book on etymology by Dr. J. van der Schaar.

'Saskia' is derived from a germ. name with 'Sas' 'Saks', common name of the Saxon.

Germ.
'sahsa' - knife
'sahs,Saxa,Saska,Sase,saex' - knife, short sword
'Sax' - little sword

Might be linked to lat. 'Saxum' - stone, which would originate in the stone age.
Selected response from:

Marjon
United States
Local time: 16:26
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2"knife" (see further)
Evert DELOOF-SYS
4 +3a Saxon
Vidmantas Stilius
4 +1Toelichting
Marjon
5Protector of mankind
Joeri Van Liefferinge
4 -1Alexandra
Chris Hopley


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Protector of mankind


Explanation:
It's a Polish name.

Joeri


    Reference: http://www.babynames.com/
Joeri Van Liefferinge
Belgium
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Vidmantas Stilius: Are you sure? Have never heard of such a Polish name.
6 mins
  -> http://www.naissances.com says it's a Polish name and http://www.babynames.com says it's Slavic. The former does not give a meaning, the latter does, that is why I only mentioned that as a reference. - Joeri
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
a Saxon


Explanation:
Dutch origins of uncertain meaning. May possibly derive form the word sachs meaning Saxon

Vidmantas Stilius
Local time: 01:26
Native speaker of: Native in LithuanianLithuanian
PRO pts in pair: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Peter Thomson
26 mins

agree  Carla Zwanenberg
55 mins

neutral  Chris Hopley: I am inclined to believe this is a popular etymology, not least because the -kia ending would appear Slavic rather than Germanic.
1 hr

agree  Marjon
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Alexandra


Explanation:
Saskia is one of the short forms of Alexandra, although I think this link has now more or less been lost in its Dutch usage. I stand open to correction, but I believe that Saskia comes to us from the Greek through Russian.

-> "Alexander is the English form of Alexandros, a Greek name. Originally it meant “Defender of the People,” from “alexein” (to defend), and “andros” (man)."
http://www.geocities.com/edgarbook/names/a/alexander.html


    Reference: http://www.geocities.com/edgarbook/names/a/alexander.html
Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2117

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Vidmantas Stilius: Sasha, Sania, Shura - yes, but not Saskia
22 mins
  -> To quote a famous Alexander, "dat is een mening".

disagree  Tina Vonhof: That should be Sasha, not Saskia.
14 hrs
  -> I beg to differ.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
"knife" (see further)


Explanation:
SASKIA f Dutch
Possibly from the Germanic element sachs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

http://www.behindthename.com/nm/s.html#sasha

With respect to first answer: source most probably got it wrong; they refer to the Russian 'pet' form of Alexander/Alexandra --> Sasha (and not 'Saskia')

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 1278

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vidmantas Stilius: I can only tell that it is definitely not Slavonic
15 mins

agree  Marjon
3 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Toelichting


Explanation:
Stilius and Evert are both right.

All information below from the book on etymology by Dr. J. van der Schaar.

'Saskia' is derived from a germ. name with 'Sas' 'Saks', common name of the Saxon.

Germ.
'sahsa' - knife
'sahs,Saxa,Saska,Sase,saex' - knife, short sword
'Sax' - little sword

Might be linked to lat. 'Saxum' - stone, which would originate in the stone age.

Marjon
United States
Local time: 16:26
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof: My daughter's name is Saskia and this is the information I found.It is quite common to switch ks(x) and ks.
1 hr
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