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luchtboogbeeldjes

English translation: figures on the flying buttresses

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:luchtboogbeeldjes
English translation:figures on the flying buttresses
Entered by: Carmen Lawrence
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11:03 Oct 17, 2002
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Dutch term or phrase: luchtboogbeeldjes
heeft te maken met fabeldieren, iets wat op een Middeleeuwse kerk voorkomt
Carmen Lawrence
Spain
Local time: 14:32
figures on the flying buttresses
Explanation:
I don't know these on St. Jan in 'sHertogenbosch, but may be "figures" is a bit too neutral and it should be:
gargoyles on the flying buttresses.
Greetings,

Nikolaus
Selected response from:

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 14:32
Grading comment
Thank you! of all the answers I received I finally came to the conclusion that I would use 'figures on the flying buttresses' due to the fact that 'gargoyles' were already mentioned as one of the features of the church; so since I could not use gargoyles again I decided to use the word 'figures' here, with 'flying buttresses' being the important part of the phrase. Of course as usual this text had to be done in a great hurry - it was a so-called 'correction' of a poor translation by another translator - so I had to make a quick decision. So thank you very much for your contribution! Hope I can help you sometime! Regards, Carmen Lawrence
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5Gargoyles
Evert DELOOF-SYS
4figures on the flying buttresses
Elisabeth Ghysels
4heaven stormers, gargoyles
Bryan Crumpler


  

Answers


39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
heaven stormers, gargoyles


Explanation:
"Vanaf het midden van de negentiende eeuw wordt er gerestaureerd aan de kathedraal. In Sint-Jansmuseum De Bouwloods is veel middeleeuws materiaal tentoongesteld, waaronder een aantal 'hemelbestormers" of luchtboogbeelden" --De Groote Stroom : http://www.grootestroom.nl/arrangement.html

"heaven-stormers" ... were people who thought they could earn salvation by their good works.

If you're talking about little animal statues, the only thing I can think of related to that in English would be a gargoyle, often statues of animals/monsters etc. displayed outside of buildings and catholic churches.

In 1st reference see para. 6
In 2nd reference see para. 5 (under Expositie - near the bottom)

Webster defines gargoyles as the following:

Main Entry: gar·goyle
Pronunciation: 'gär-"goil
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English gargoyl, from Middle French gargouille; akin to Middle French gargouiller
Date: 13th century
1 a : a spout in the form of a grotesque human or animal figure projecting from a roof gutter to throw rainwater clear of a building b : a grotesquely carved figure
2 : a person with an ugly face



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Note added at 2002-10-17 11:45:32 (GMT)
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You probably want to go with \"gargoyles\"


    Reference: http://gospelpedlar.com/stepchildren.html
    Reference: http://www.stelling.nl/denbosch/zien.htm
Bryan Crumpler
United States
Local time: 08:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 264
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
figures on the flying buttresses


Explanation:
I don't know these on St. Jan in 'sHertogenbosch, but may be "figures" is a bit too neutral and it should be:
gargoyles on the flying buttresses.
Greetings,

Nikolaus

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 14:32
PRO pts in pair: 168
Grading comment
Thank you! of all the answers I received I finally came to the conclusion that I would use 'figures on the flying buttresses' due to the fact that 'gargoyles' were already mentioned as one of the features of the church; so since I could not use gargoyles again I decided to use the word 'figures' here, with 'flying buttresses' being the important part of the phrase. Of course as usual this text had to be done in a great hurry - it was a so-called 'correction' of a poor translation by another translator - so I had to make a quick decision. So thank you very much for your contribution! Hope I can help you sometime! Regards, Carmen Lawrence
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Gargoyles


Explanation:
All Gargoyles are 'luchtboogbeeldjes', but not all 'luchtboogbeeldjes' are 'Gargoyles'.
Since you mentioned 'fabeldieren', I do however, think this is the term you're looking for.

Gargoyle : From the Old French: gargouille, meaning: throat.
The word refers to sound which water makes as it passes through the gullet. Originally a reference to the drains atop cathedrals which were later carved into the form of beasts or animals

http://www.elore.com/Gothic/Glossary/features.htm

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 14:32
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 1278
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