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onroerende goederen

English translation: property

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:onroerende goederen
English translation:property
Entered by: Dave Greatrix
Options:
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19:07 Mar 13, 2002
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
Dutch term or phrase: onroerende goederen
ivm belastingen
sofie oliverio
property
Explanation:
In the context of taxation, in the UK we would simply say "property tax" for taxation on what they know in the States as "real estate". "Immovable property" had only 14 hits on Google UK pages, almost all originating from Malta or Cyprus. This would suggest that it is a translation from the local languages. However "Immovable property" is not a term that I am familiar with in England. I would suggest, as any Englishman would, that property in this context, is by definition immovable.

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Note added at 2002-03-13 20:16:53 (GMT)
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International Tax
... Uganda; Ukraine; United Arab Emirates; United Kingdom; United States; Uruguay;
US Virgin Islands; ... Canadian Property Tax Association; Canadian Tax Foundation; ...
www.taxsites.com/international.html - 30k - 12 Mar 2002 - Cached - Similar pages

twentieth century London city, England (United Kingdom, UK) ...
... the tallest building in the United Kingdom, and the Docklands Light Railway to ... the
Conservative government replaced the property tax with a community ...
www.greatestcities.com/london/london-8-f.html - 43k - Cached - Similar pages

LLRX.com - Devolution in the United Kingdom: A Revolution in ...
... the constitutional structure of the United Kingdom. A major component of ... company
commercial, intellectual property, property, tax, personal injury and ...
www.llrx.com/features/devolution.htm


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Note added at 2002-03-13 20:22:30 (GMT)
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By the way, my remark about the English language was my little joke, before anybody starts. o))
Selected response from:

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4property
Dave Greatrix
4 +1immovables / real estate
Evert DELOOF-SYS
5real estate or fixed assets
Greta Holmer
4real property
Yngve Roennike
4British English: Immovable (not immoveable) propertyxxxjarry


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
British English: Immovable (not immoveable) property


Explanation:
US English: Real estate.



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Note added at 2002-03-13 19:23:00 (GMT)
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Immovables would not be an appropriate alternative in this context.

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Note added at 2002-03-13 20:28:21 (GMT)
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My \'agree\" to David\'s suggested answer should of course have been \"disagree\".

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Note added at 2002-03-13 20:47:59 (GMT)
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I get 51800 hits on Google. Here is one of them:
Secured Creditors
Jersey law generally treats immovable property and movable property very differently. \"Immovable property\" means, basically, lands, buildings and leases of lands or buildings for more than nine years. \"Movable property\" means everything else. (Until the Bankruptcy Law came into force, désastre only affected movable property.)

It is possible to mortgage immovable property. The lender obtains security by having the loan (or mortgage) registered by the Royal Court and that registration means that the proceeds of sale of that property are first applied to repay that loan. If there is more than one mortgage on a property, the mortgagees have rights based on date - an earlier mortgage ranks for repayment before a later one.

It is not possible to create a mortgage over most movable property. In England, it is everyday business to create a type of mortgage over a borrowing company\'s stock and other assets, but this cannot be done in this Island. The only exception to this rule of law is when a \"security interest\" is created under the stringent terms of the Security Interests (Jersey) Law, 1983. Under that law, a security interest can be taken over \"intangible movable property other than a lease\" - if you can physically touch the asset, you cannot mortgage it. For example, in a domestic context it is now quite usual for someone taking out a mortgage to buy his home to take out at the same time a life assurance policy designed to repay the mortgage automatically if he dies - the lender is given a security interest over the life assurance policy. The person holding the security interest (the lender) has similar rights to a mortgagee of immovable property.




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Note added at 2002-03-14 09:07:48 (GMT)
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Dave, I know about your predilection (yaaaawn) for Google, but are 51800 hits \"conspicuously absent\" on the Internet?

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Note added at 2002-03-14 09:12:39 (GMT)
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Marijke, all I did in my suggested answer was to point out that there are significant differences in terminology and other areas between UK and US English. I have no particular preference for either and I don\'t know why you find it necessary to be so aggressive about it. Could it be because your husband is American?

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Note added at 2002-03-14 09:16:53 (GMT)
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gholmer, tangible fixed asstes in annual accounts is a heading under which items such as Land & buildings, Plant & Machinery and Furrniture & Equipment will be found. It is NEVER a translation of \"Onroerende goederen\" as such, simply because tangible fixed assets can include movable property.

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 15:59
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Dave Greatrix: Immovable Property is certainly not "British English" if indeed there is such a thing, "Queen's English" is UK English.
42 mins
  -> David, open ANY set of published accounts of ANY plc which has property included in its fixed assets. I have been translating these documents and annual reports as a whole for 20 years, including for Ernst & Young.

neutral  Chris Hopley: Dave, I thought the Huw Edwards brand of English was now considered definitive UK English?! :-]
13 hrs

agree  Lucy Simpson: Just to add my two-penn'orth, I often use 'immovable and movable property' when it appears in articles of association and the lawyers I work for have never picked me up on it.
14 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
real estate or fixed assets


Explanation:
this is often translated as real estate or fixed assets.

HTH


    Le Docte: Legal Dictionary
    Reference: http://www.businesstown.com/accounting/basic-sheets.asp
Greta Holmer
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxjarry: Fixed assets could include plant & machinery, furniture & equipment, etc.
3 mins
  -> it is not apparent from this what the context is - if it property taxation then it should be translated as immovable property or real estate but if it is financial accounts for a company's taxation it may well be fixed assets.

agree  Robert Wijngaarde: Real estate is what I'd use ...
8 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
immovables / real estate


Explanation:
both are being used.
Check any of the above at www.google.com for thousands of hits.

HTH

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 15:59
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 1278

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjarry: Real estate is rarely used in the UK. Is the standard term for (immovable) property in the US.
3 mins
  -> How do you know where 'Sofie Oliverio' is based?

agree  Marijke Mayer: Exactly, this is what I mean Jarry, what is so good about British English anyhow? The Brits haven't invented the language, you know, it was built up over the years by foreign influences to what it is today. A shared language spoken all over the world.
10 hrs

neutral  Chris Hopley: Whooaa, easy now Marijke! You might offend my British sensibilities!!! ;-]]
13 hrs

neutral  Lucy Simpson: realistically, we could do with a filter for US/UK English, to avoid this sort of exchange. As the quote goes 'America and Britain are two countries divided by a common language'.
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
property


Explanation:
In the context of taxation, in the UK we would simply say "property tax" for taxation on what they know in the States as "real estate". "Immovable property" had only 14 hits on Google UK pages, almost all originating from Malta or Cyprus. This would suggest that it is a translation from the local languages. However "Immovable property" is not a term that I am familiar with in England. I would suggest, as any Englishman would, that property in this context, is by definition immovable.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-13 20:16:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

International Tax
... Uganda; Ukraine; United Arab Emirates; United Kingdom; United States; Uruguay;
US Virgin Islands; ... Canadian Property Tax Association; Canadian Tax Foundation; ...
www.taxsites.com/international.html - 30k - 12 Mar 2002 - Cached - Similar pages

twentieth century London city, England (United Kingdom, UK) ...
... the tallest building in the United Kingdom, and the Docklands Light Railway to ... the
Conservative government replaced the property tax with a community ...
www.greatestcities.com/london/london-8-f.html - 43k - Cached - Similar pages

LLRX.com - Devolution in the United Kingdom: A Revolution in ...
... the constitutional structure of the United Kingdom. A major component of ... company
commercial, intellectual property, property, tax, personal injury and ...
www.llrx.com/features/devolution.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-13 20:22:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, my remark about the English language was my little joke, before anybody starts. o))

Dave Greatrix
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1747
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxjarry: In the context in which the question has been askwed, property would not suffice. Property can include movable property. In terms of taxation the difference is very important.
13 mins
  -> Jarry we know about your experiences (yawn) but why is immovable property so conspicuous in its absence on the Internet.

agree  Marijke Mayer: Very succinctly put, Dave!
9 hrs

agree  Chris Hopley: I agree completely. I would add, though, that the terms "real estate" and "immovable property" would be understood perfectly well by any subject matter expert in the UK, even if not actively used.
12 hrs

agree  Josephina Kooijman
1 day22 hrs
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3 days20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
real property


Explanation:
seems to be the US variant.

Yngve Roennike
Local time: 09:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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