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koekje

English translation: kookyuh

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:koekje
English translation:kookyuh
Entered by: dpg
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02:05 Oct 25, 2006
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Dutch term or phrase: koekje
How do you pronounce the word, koekje; which means small or little cake or cookie?
dpg
kookyuh
Explanation:
Doesn't need much explanation. The "je" ending means "small" - you will find this used in many Dutch words.

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Note added at 16 hrs (2006-10-25 18:53:54 GMT)
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To me the 'oe' in koekje sounds very similar to the 'oo' in cookie (both are fairly short) and not like the 'oo' in moo, which is more protracted. But maybe our Canadian cows moo a little differently than others...
Selected response from:

Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 04:14
Grading comment
Thanks so much! Have a good day.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8kookyuh
Tina Vonhof
3 -1sort of "kook-hye"
Fabio Descalzi


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
sort of "kook-hye"


Explanation:
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/food_history/53959
The Dutch gave us the word for cookie--koeptji or koekje, which means "small cake." In 1627, the Dutch introduced holiday cookies to the North American continent through their early settlements in the New World. Cookie recipes were also included in the first cookbook published in North America in 1796. "One recipe, called Another Christmas Cookey, called for three pounds of flour, a tea cup of fine powdered coriander seed, one pound of butter and 3 tea spoonfuls of pearl ash dissolved in a tea cup of milk," according to a recent article that appeared in a Better Homes and Gardens special publication. Like most early cookies, they achieved their shape by rolling and cutting.

Fabio Descalzi
Uruguay
Local time: 07:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tina Vonhof: Interesting bit of history but I don't agree with your pronounciation.
52 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
kookyuh


Explanation:
Doesn't need much explanation. The "je" ending means "small" - you will find this used in many Dutch words.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2006-10-25 18:53:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To me the 'oe' in koekje sounds very similar to the 'oo' in cookie (both are fairly short) and not like the 'oo' in moo, which is more protracted. But maybe our Canadian cows moo a little differently than others...

Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 04:14
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks so much! Have a good day.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fabio Descalzi
9 mins
  -> Thank you Fabio.

agree  Dave Calderhead
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Dave

agree  Ken Cox: ok if the asker understands that 'oo' is to be pronounced similar to 'oo' in 'boot' or like the 'oo' in 'roof' in UK pronunciation (but not US pronunciation!).\\ oo is different in cookie and boot, and different in US and UK in roof
3 hrs
  -> Don't know what you mean, oo is oo in any English language.

agree  Kate Hudson
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Kate.

agree  Maaike van Vlijmen
5 hrs
  -> Thank you Maaike Anne.

agree  Suzan Hamer: and with Ken; US pronunciation would be like the "oo" in "moo." //Well, that's the way it sounds to me out here in the platteland.
5 hrs
  -> Don't agree - koeoeoekje? It should be a fairly short 'oo'.

agree  vixen
5 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  vic voskuil: to aid using the right oo it might help to write "cookyuh"
2 days20 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Oct 25, 2006 - Changes made by writeaway:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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