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zich door een dal slepen

English translation: trough/recession

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13:12 Mar 29, 2004
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / krantenkop
Dutch term or phrase: zich door een dal slepen
Nederland sleept zich door diep economisch dal
Carin Donkers
Netherlands
Local time: 22:44
English translation:trough/recession
Explanation:
"The Netherlands is in a deep economic trough" or "The Netherlands is struggling through a deep economic recession".
The first expression borrows from weather terminology, while the second states less metaphorically what is meant.

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Note added at 2004-03-29 14:03:26 (GMT)
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Although the Netherlands takes it name from the historic collection of provinces (the Netherlands and Belgium were once referred to as the \'Low Countries\') it is now a single country and should be referred to in the singular. Odd, but that is the beauty of language.

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Note added at 2004-03-29 14:04:27 (GMT)
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sorry, \'its name\'.
Selected response from:

Christopher Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:44
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +8trough/recession
Christopher Smith
3 +1struggling with severe slowdown
neilgouw


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
trough/recession


Explanation:
"The Netherlands is in a deep economic trough" or "The Netherlands is struggling through a deep economic recession".
The first expression borrows from weather terminology, while the second states less metaphorically what is meant.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-29 14:03:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although the Netherlands takes it name from the historic collection of provinces (the Netherlands and Belgium were once referred to as the \'Low Countries\') it is now a single country and should be referred to in the singular. Odd, but that is the beauty of language.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-29 14:04:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, \'its name\'.

Christopher Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  George Vardanyan: The Netherlands is
50 mins

agree  Iris70
1 hr

agree  Saskia Steur
1 hr

agree  xxxjarry: Netherlands is singular
1 hr

agree  Chris Hopley
1 hr

agree  Tina Vonhof
2 hrs

agree  Mirjam Bonne-Nollen
3 hrs

agree  Dave Greatrix
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
struggling with severe slowdown


Explanation:
just another idea (no metaphor, but alliteration):

(The) Netherlands (are) struggling with severe slowdown

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Note added at 1 hr 15 mins (2004-03-29 14:28:10 GMT)
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oops, singular indeed

neilgouw
Netherlands
Local time: 22:44
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Hopley: Singular indeed, otherwise fine.
1 hr
  -> thanks dude!
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