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Grootedelachtbaar College!

English translation: Distinguished members of the Court

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:Grootedelachtbaar College!
English translation:Distinguished members of the Court
Entered by: xxxJon O
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19:48 Mar 14, 2007
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law (general)
Dutch term or phrase: Grootedelachtbaar College!
Is there a formal English equivalent of this?

This is at the beginning of some legal pleadings.
xxxJon O
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:15
Distinguished members of the Court
Explanation:
There does seem to be a difference here between America and Europe. Distinguished members of the Court is used more in Europe (for example at the ICC, ICJ, PCA)
However, I can see Tina's point, though the expression in the UK would probably be "May it please your Lordship(s)" (see refs below).
In the Netherlands, where a panel of judges usually sits rather than the single judge in the UK, the opening "Distinguished members of the Court" would, I think, be a more appropriate translation in this instance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2007-03-15 08:53:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, as writeaway points out, this is also the definition in the Juridisch lexicon.
Selected response from:

CJG
Netherlands
Local time: 01:15
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3Distinguished members of the CourtCJG
4 +2May it please the court
Tina Vonhof


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
May it please the court


Explanation:
The standard way to address the court.


    Reference: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,890793,00.h...
Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 17:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kate Hudson: Precisely my thoughts....
1 hr
  -> Thank you Kate.

neutral  writeaway: that comes at the end of pleadings + includes the word "behage".this is at the beginning and means"(very) distinguished members of the court." http://www.proz.com/kudoz/712703 for this question look up edelachtbaar college in Jurlex/maybe-but UK for this
2 hrs
  -> There may be a difference here between British and North American courts.

neutral  CJG: see my explanation below
11 hrs

neutral  Buck: may it please the court comes at the end. The "heading" is distinguished members of the court
14 hrs

agree  Luise Krahmer: The correct Dutch term is by the way: Edelgrootachtbaar ( Nobel- great- respected) instead of Grootedelachtbaar, I think there was a slip in your source text.
474 days
  -> Thanks, but another answer was selected a long time ago.
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Distinguished members of the Court


Explanation:
There does seem to be a difference here between America and Europe. Distinguished members of the Court is used more in Europe (for example at the ICC, ICJ, PCA)
However, I can see Tina's point, though the expression in the UK would probably be "May it please your Lordship(s)" (see refs below).
In the Netherlands, where a panel of judges usually sits rather than the single judge in the UK, the opening "Distinguished members of the Court" would, I think, be a more appropriate translation in this instance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2007-03-15 08:53:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, as writeaway points out, this is also the definition in the Juridisch lexicon.


    (a) law.uwe.ac.uk/internal/students/mooting/mooting_guide.htm
    (b) www.icc-cpi.int/organs/otp.html
CJG
Netherlands
Local time: 01:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway
33 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Buck
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Buck

agree  Siobhan Schoonhoff-Reilly
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Siobhan
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