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conveniëren

English translation: be to the satisfaction of

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:conveniëren
English translation:be to the satisfaction of
Entered by: Kathleen Ferny
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10:05 Jun 6, 2002
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Dutch term or phrase: conveniëren
ondernemer heeft overgelegd de betreffende bestekken en bouwtekeningen, welke bescheiden van deze overeenkomst deel uitmaken en welke X moeten conveniëren;

ondernemer heeft overgelegd een gewaarmerkt afschrift van de door hem verkregen onherroepelijke bouwvergunning met bijlagen en deze X convenieert;

ondernemer heeft overgelegd aan X een besluit van de aandeelhouders van Y waarin expliciet de krachtens de statuten benodigde goedkeuring van de onder f. genoemde koopovereenkomst is genomen, welk besluit X moet conveniëren;

X is in deze tekst de instantie die voor de financiering van het project zal instaan.
Kathleen Ferny
Belgium
Local time: 00:13
... which have to be to the satisfaction of ...
Explanation:
is the most common way of translating this in texts of this kind.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-06 12:05:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think that in all three sentences, the documents referred to have to be to the satisfaction of X. This is particularly poorly worded in the second sentence but nevertheless clear from the context. The use of: ..., welke bescheiden van deze overeenkomst deel uitmaken\" and ..., welk besluit moet convenieren...\" merely tells me that the author does not know the difference between a restrictive and non-restrictive realtive clause. An example in English:
The travellers, who knew about the floods, took another road.
The travellers who knew about the floods, took another road.
In the first sentence, all the travellers knew about the floods and took another road (non restrictive). In the second, only the travellers who knew about the floods took another road (restrictive). The difference a comma can make! The same rule basically applies in Dutch, and more particularly to the first and third sentences under review (see extracts).
Selected response from:

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 00:13
Grading comment
Exactly what I was looking for... thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5... which have to be to the satisfaction of ...xxxjarry
3 +1be agreeable toxxxhartran
4to satisfy
Bart B. Van Bockstaele
41) ought to befit to / should get approval from 2) ...befits 3) should befit to
Evert DELOOF-SYS
3Accommodate
Adam Smith
3agree toxxxhartran


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Accommodate


Explanation:
X has to accommodate the decision.

I'm not entirely sure about this, but here's an examle:

"The CPCC requested that the approval be conditional on the proposed amendments being approved by the shareholders in accordance with section 12.1 of the USA. The CPCC undertook to file with the Commission, a copy of each version of the amended and restated USA as executed by CPCC and certified by the Secretary of CPCC as having received the requisite approval of the shareholders.

Commission findings and determination
11.
The Commission notes the CPCC's submission that the proposed amendments are essential to accommodate the requirements of Decision 2001-756. The Commission is of the view that these proposed amendments achieve the appropriate organizational changes to implement Decision 2001-756."






    Reference: http://www.crtc.gc.ca/archive/ENG/Decisions/2002/dt2002-31.h...
Adam Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1145

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Hopley: The use of conveniëren seems to be slighlty skew of the dictionary definition here, but 'accommodate' seems to work well in the translation.
10 mins
  -> Thanks

disagree  Bart B. Van Bockstaele: X doesn't have to accommodate anything. He is the one to be accommodated.
27 mins
  -> It's an ambiguous sentence, either X has to accommodate the decision, or the decision has to accommodate X. It could go either way.
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
1) ought to befit to / should get approval from 2) ...befits 3) should befit to


Explanation:
Several possibilities, but I think 'befit' suits nicely here

Conveniëren ('samenkomen')has several meanings depending on context: betamen, passen, overeenkomen, tegemoet komen aan, goedkeuren...;

Mind you, '...en deze X convenieert' is horrible Dutch (if Dutch at all :))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-06 12:27:20 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

French: convenir à = English: to befit

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 00:13
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 1278
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to satisfy


Explanation:
They must satisfy X, otherwise X won't take the "right" decision.

You can also use "to convenience". It is not used very often, but that's also true for conveni?ren.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-06 10:38:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"to suit\" is also good.


Bart B. Van Bockstaele
Canada
Local time: 18:13
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 62
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
agree to


Explanation:
sounds like the French convenir put into Dutch, a common occurrence in Flemish...

xxxhartran
Local time: 00:13
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bart B. Van Bockstaele: Your comment about Flemish is right on. But it is not the case here. They only want to sound "official" and show off their supposed knowledge of legalese. Agree is what they would like X to do. But it only means "que cela doit lui convenir", in this case.
16 mins
  -> In that case, I'd suggest .. be agreeable to
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
be agreeable to


Explanation:
This is attempt number 2 after helpful comments from Bart.

xxxhartran
Local time: 00:13
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bart B. Van Bockstaele: It sounds a bit "agreeable" (agréable) but it is agreeable to me ^_^
4 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
... which have to be to the satisfaction of ...


Explanation:
is the most common way of translating this in texts of this kind.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-06 12:05:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think that in all three sentences, the documents referred to have to be to the satisfaction of X. This is particularly poorly worded in the second sentence but nevertheless clear from the context. The use of: ..., welke bescheiden van deze overeenkomst deel uitmaken\" and ..., welk besluit moet convenieren...\" merely tells me that the author does not know the difference between a restrictive and non-restrictive realtive clause. An example in English:
The travellers, who knew about the floods, took another road.
The travellers who knew about the floods, took another road.
In the first sentence, all the travellers knew about the floods and took another road (non restrictive). In the second, only the travellers who knew about the floods took another road (restrictive). The difference a comma can make! The same rule basically applies in Dutch, and more particularly to the first and third sentences under review (see extracts).

xxxjarry
South Africa
Local time: 00:13
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3855
Grading comment
Exactly what I was looking for... thanks!
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