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TENENBOOM

English translation: fir tree

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:denneboom
English translation:fir tree
Entered by: SeiTT
Options:
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18:33 Mar 5, 2004
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
Dutch term or phrase: TENENBOOM
I understand that this means "fir tree".
But what about this element "ten"? Does it have a meaning of its own, or only as part of the word TENENBOOM?
I understand BOOM to = TREE.
Thank you.
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:53
yes, den = denneboom
Explanation:
Assumed the Dutch "denneboom" is meant, yes.
denneboom = den = fir (tree)
beukeboom = beuk = beech (tree)

According to Van Dale Groot woordenboek der Nederlandse taal, "den" stems actually from Breton tann (oak!!!)

tann > Tanne > dan(ne) > den

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Note added at 2004-03-05 20:34:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

writeaway:
absolutely. Dutch for instance borrowed a lot from Latin, but also from Gallo-Romance.

Wahrig gives a somewhat different version:
Indo-Germanic *dhanuo- (tree) > Old High German Tanna > Tanne
Selected response from:

Henk Peelen
Netherlands
Local time: 16:53
Grading comment
many thanks, excellent!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3denneboom
Chris Hopley
3 +2yes, den = denneboom
Henk Peelen
3 +2fir treeMag. Sabine Senn


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
fir tree


Explanation:

I have never asked myself this question
in German the word is *Tannenbaum* or simply Tanne. Baum=tree, Tanne=type of tree
maybe the Dutch expression has German roots? no pun intended

Mag. Sabine Senn
Local time: 16:53

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Hopley: It certainly does have German roots; in old, middle and/or certain dialects of German, you also encounter 'tenne' and 'denne'.
12 mins
  -> Interesting, isn`t it? Thanks

agree  Mirjam Bonne-Nollen
28 mins
  -> Thanks
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tenenboom
denneboom


Explanation:
I'm not sure how you got hold of 'tenenboom', but I think you mean 'denneboom', which does mean fir tree. The root word is 'den', which also means fir tree.

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 37

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Adam Smith
27 mins

agree  writeaway: the Grimm brothers bit applies-trinken, drinken-vive le sound shift
56 mins

agree  Jacqueline van der Spek
13 hrs
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
yes, den = denneboom


Explanation:
Assumed the Dutch "denneboom" is meant, yes.
denneboom = den = fir (tree)
beukeboom = beuk = beech (tree)

According to Van Dale Groot woordenboek der Nederlandse taal, "den" stems actually from Breton tann (oak!!!)

tann > Tanne > dan(ne) > den

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-05 20:34:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

writeaway:
absolutely. Dutch for instance borrowed a lot from Latin, but also from Gallo-Romance.

Wahrig gives a somewhat different version:
Indo-Germanic *dhanuo- (tree) > Old High German Tanna > Tanne

Henk Peelen
Netherlands
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
many thanks, excellent!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: makes sense- maybe the Breton borrowed from the German.words can slip into a language sideways too, not always directly
14 mins

agree  Andre de Vries: Sanskrit dhanush - a bow (and arrow)
2 hrs
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