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De storting ervoor heeft wat minder extract dan met x

English translation: the grain bill (i.e. total amount of malt used) has less extract than is the case with...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:De storting ervoor heeft wat minder extract dan met x
English translation:the grain bill (i.e. total amount of malt used) has less extract than is the case with...
Entered by: MoiraB
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14:56 Jun 29, 2004
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Other / beer brewing
Dutch term or phrase: De storting ervoor heeft wat minder extract dan met x
I know that the sugar content of a wort/beer is typically expressed as extract in degrees Plato, but what's this phrase all about?

Beck’s kan vergeleken worden met Stella Artois: het heeft samen nog met Leffe Blond ook universele eigenschappen in de zin dat de wijnparallel ook roséwijn is. Maar toch is Beck’s gelijk wat anders. De storting ervoor heeft wat minder extract dan met Stella: 11,2 Plato tov 11,8 , ook het alcoholgehalte is wat minder 4,90%Vol tov 5,11 , de bitterheid is vergelijkbaar 28 BTU tov 26, maar vooral, in de grondstoffenmix voor Stella zit 20% mais als zetmeelbron terwijl Beck’s node rigoereus voldoet aan wat in Duitsland genoemd wordt het “Reinheitsgebot”.
MoiraB
France
Local time: 18:50
the mash used for this has less extract than with x
Explanation:
As this is not the malt it would seem to be the mash component of the beer brewing process and the use of 'storting' is Flemish, not Dutch.
From
www.scottish-newcastle.com/sn/beer/brewingbeer/
Beer production starts with high quality raw materials. The basic ingredient of beer is barley. Barley is transformed into malt at the maltings by steeping the grains in water and allowing them to germinate. This breaks down the complex molecules of starch, cellulose and protein inside each grain so they can be used in the brewing process, the final result being a package of starch, some sugar and the enzymes (special proteins which act as catalysts for biological reactions) to convert the starch to sugar. Germination is stopped by heating the malt in an oven called a kiln. This dries out the malt so that it can be stored but also caramelises some of the sugars. The longer malt is kilned, the darker the malt becomes. This reduces the enzyme activity but increases colour and flavour, and small quantities of these darker malts are used to provide the colour and flavour of the final beer. Other essential ingredients are water (known as liquor in brewing) and hops, the flowers of the hop plant being used to provide bitterness, aroma and flavour. Other raw materials can also be used to replace part of the malt to impart unique characteristics of appearance, aroma or flavour to the final beer. These are called adjuncts and can include materials such as maize, rice, wheat or liquid sugars and syrups.

top

The brewing process begins with the malt being lightly crushed into a coarse powder called a grist. The grist is transferred to a vessel called a mash tun where it is mixed or mashed with hot water. This dissolves the starch and allows the enzymes in the malt to convert the starch to sugars. The temperature and time of mashing are critical in determining the quality and characteristics of the final beer. When this process is complete, the mash is transferred to a vessel called a lauter tun where the sugary liquid or wort is separated from the grain residue. The wort from the lauter tun is transferred to a wort kettle where the wort is boiled and the hops are added. Hops are added at the start of the boil to provide bitterness and may also be added near the end of the boil to add aroma and flavour. Boiling sterilises the wort, removes unpleasant aromas and flavours and makes material which would cause the wort to become cloudy, clump together or "flocculate". The wort is transferred to a vessel called a whirlpool which uses a high speed swirling or vortex effect to remove the unwanted solids. The wort is sent from the whirlpool via a wort cooler or paraflow to a fermentation vessel. As the wort leaves the paraflow, yeast is added, as well as oxygen to allow the yeast to multiply before fermentation begins.
Selected response from:

Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 18:50
Grading comment
Finally able to grade (was using the wrong interface apparently). Thanks for pointing me in the right direction (see fuller answer in added comment).
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1the mash used for this has less extract than with x
Kate Hudson


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the mash used for this has less extract than with x


Explanation:
As this is not the malt it would seem to be the mash component of the beer brewing process and the use of 'storting' is Flemish, not Dutch.
From
www.scottish-newcastle.com/sn/beer/brewingbeer/
Beer production starts with high quality raw materials. The basic ingredient of beer is barley. Barley is transformed into malt at the maltings by steeping the grains in water and allowing them to germinate. This breaks down the complex molecules of starch, cellulose and protein inside each grain so they can be used in the brewing process, the final result being a package of starch, some sugar and the enzymes (special proteins which act as catalysts for biological reactions) to convert the starch to sugar. Germination is stopped by heating the malt in an oven called a kiln. This dries out the malt so that it can be stored but also caramelises some of the sugars. The longer malt is kilned, the darker the malt becomes. This reduces the enzyme activity but increases colour and flavour, and small quantities of these darker malts are used to provide the colour and flavour of the final beer. Other essential ingredients are water (known as liquor in brewing) and hops, the flowers of the hop plant being used to provide bitterness, aroma and flavour. Other raw materials can also be used to replace part of the malt to impart unique characteristics of appearance, aroma or flavour to the final beer. These are called adjuncts and can include materials such as maize, rice, wheat or liquid sugars and syrups.

top

The brewing process begins with the malt being lightly crushed into a coarse powder called a grist. The grist is transferred to a vessel called a mash tun where it is mixed or mashed with hot water. This dissolves the starch and allows the enzymes in the malt to convert the starch to sugars. The temperature and time of mashing are critical in determining the quality and characteristics of the final beer. When this process is complete, the mash is transferred to a vessel called a lauter tun where the sugary liquid or wort is separated from the grain residue. The wort from the lauter tun is transferred to a wort kettle where the wort is boiled and the hops are added. Hops are added at the start of the boil to provide bitterness and may also be added near the end of the boil to add aroma and flavour. Boiling sterilises the wort, removes unpleasant aromas and flavours and makes material which would cause the wort to become cloudy, clump together or "flocculate". The wort is transferred to a vessel called a whirlpool which uses a high speed swirling or vortex effect to remove the unwanted solids. The wort is sent from the whirlpool via a wort cooler or paraflow to a fermentation vessel. As the wort leaves the paraflow, yeast is added, as well as oxygen to allow the yeast to multiply before fermentation begins.


    Reference: http://www.scottish-newcastle.com/sn/beer/brewingbeer/
Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 18:50
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 89
Grading comment
Finally able to grade (was using the wrong interface apparently). Thanks for pointing me in the right direction (see fuller answer in added comment).

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: good point about the Flemish. seems to be an ignored category,
2 hrs
  -> thank you
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