KudoZ home » Dutch to English » Other

piskijkers

English translation: tea-leaf readers, soothsayers

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:piskijkers
English translation:tea-leaf readers, soothsayers
Entered by: Robert Allwood
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

17:50 Feb 20, 2005
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
Dutch term or phrase: piskijkers
Voor levensbeschouwelijke vragen kan men terugvallen op religieuze bronnen zoals de Koran of de Bijbel... Daarvoor bestaan vrij gebruikelijke methoden zoals het bidden, maar piskijkers en sterrenwichelaars vinden ook in onze tijd nog voldoende emplooi. Het Orakel van Delphi, het bekijken van de ingewanden van een pas gedood paard, het lezen van de lijnen in de hand, het bestuderen van Nostradamus ...
Robert Allwood
Local time: 12:06
tea-leaf readers, soothsayers
Explanation:
I'm not sure of the corresponding register in English. In the literal sense, piskijkers must be rare to non-existent in the Netherlands as well as in English-speaking parts of the world, but the term does appear to be used figuratively to mean 'fortune-tellers' or the like -- thus the suggested non-literal translation.
Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 13:06
Grading comment
Thank you, Chris, for yr exhaustive explanation, but I don't think anyoine would know what I meant if I used the term piss prophet! (And the editor would undoubtedly censor it)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3fortune-tellers
George Thomson
3 +3tea-leaf readers, soothsayersKen Cox
4 +1piss prophet, uromancer
Chris Hopley
4Piss Watcher
Marijke Mayer


  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Piss Watcher


Explanation:
Rough Guides Travel... Then there's the Piss Watcher by Jan Steen of a physician who "reads" urine to see if a woman is pregnant. Who said a museum can't be fun?! ...
travel.roughguides.com/planning/journalEntryActivity. asp?JournalID=36149&EntryID=39625 - 60k - Toegevoegde zoekresultaten


Marijke Mayer
Netherlands
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Dutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tina Vonhof: apart from this one reference to Jan Steen, which is a literal translation from Dutch, this term seems to appear mostly on porn sites.
1 hr
  -> In the Middle Ages, doctors used to check their patients' urine to evaluate their patients' health and were indeed called 'piss watchers'. I am very sorry indeed that the once-common word of 'piss' now has such bad connotations in both Dutch and English.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
fortune-tellers


Explanation:
anyone who thinks they can tell or explain events now or in the future

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 8 mins (2005-02-20 20:58:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve also heard it used as slang for doctors..

George Thomson
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof: or: diviners, stargazers.
1 hr

agree  neilgouw
16 hrs

agree  moya
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tea-leaf readers, soothsayers


Explanation:
I'm not sure of the corresponding register in English. In the literal sense, piskijkers must be rare to non-existent in the Netherlands as well as in English-speaking parts of the world, but the term does appear to be used figuratively to mean 'fortune-tellers' or the like -- thus the suggested non-literal translation.

Ken Cox
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 37
Grading comment
Thank you, Chris, for yr exhaustive explanation, but I don't think anyoine would know what I meant if I used the term piss prophet! (And the editor would undoubtedly censor it)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Monica Sandor: prefer soothsayers
1 hr

agree  Tina Vonhof: Also good options. I like tea-leaf readers in this context because it also involves the use of a liquid.
19 hrs

agree  AllisonK: I was just going to say what Tina said.........
1 day20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
piskijker
piss prophet, uromancer


Explanation:
The proper term is uromancer, but an older term is 'piss prophet'.

-> "Uromancy. Medical diagnosis gained by inspection of the urine. First recorded in Agrippa where it is used derisively of physicians, along with drymimancy and scatomancy. ... As practiced in former times it was quite a simplistic. In a book by physician Thomas Brain entitled The Pisse-Prophet dating from 1655, we are told that, basically, diseases were categorised by uromancers into two types acute and chronic, and that dark coloured urine signified acute diseases, and weak, watery urine signified chronic diseases. Chemical analysis of urine was not performed, rather it was looked at concerning its "severall colours, parts, contents, substance, quantity, [and] smell"."
http://www.webspinning.com.au/home/lambertj/public_html/u.ma...

-> "Uromancy is divination by observing a person's urine. Practiced by the ancient Greeks, the uromancer would gaze into urine to see visions. Uromancy was sometimes used to divine whether a woman was a virgin, pregnant, or had a spouse. The Roman author Pliny spoke of "spitting into the urine the moment it is voided" to reverse a bad omen. Try it. You'll like it"
http://copybook.blogspot.com/2003_10_01_copybook_archive.htm...

-> "Take, for example, the standard urinalysis.
"Going way back in time," he said "I would have been called a 'piss prophet,' a highly respected individual by the way. I would have been invited to the patient's home to prognosticate using my senses alone. I'd look at the urine to see if it was turbid or red. I'd certainly smell it to see if it was ammoniacal, and I'd taste it for sweetness. Hence the term 'mellitus' as in diabetes mellitus which means 'sweet like honey.' ""
http://www.pathology.vcu.edu/news/grand52.html

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 37

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marijke Mayer: Actually, uromancer is the word I was looking for. That's it! It's nice to have you on this site, Chris!
2 days9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search