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geleidekaart

English translation: companion pass

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:geleidekaart
English translation:companion pass
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15:39 May 14, 2002
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Transport / Transportation / Shipping / transport
Dutch term or phrase: geleidekaart
Card/pass issued by Nederlandse Spoorwegen (Dutch Railways), which allows anyone accompanying a blind, partially sighted or disabled person to travel free on trains, buses, trams, metro, etc. Synonym is 'begeleiderskaart'. Pass is issued to the disabled person, who can choose who is to accompany him/her.
Moira Bluer
travelling companion's railcard
Explanation:
In the UK, there is a similar arrangement: the disabled person’s railcard. This gives disabled travellers and a helper a third of train travel (not as generous as the Dutch!).

"The disabled person’s railcard
You can get a railcard if you are deaf, registered blind or getting either disability living allowance (DLA) or severe disablement allowance (SDA). With the railcard you and a friend or helper can get a third off most train travel."
http://www.after16.org.uk/pages/leis2.html

The "helper" is sometimes referred to as a travelling companion: "The card entitles you to one-third off most fares. Wheelchair users and people who are visually impaired travelling with companions get discounts without a card. Companions get the same discount."
http://www.directions-plus.org.uk/publications/dplus_second/...

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Note added at 2002-05-14 16:03:18 (GMT)
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\"Travelcard\" might be better in your context, as it applies to all public transport, not just trains.
Selected response from:

Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 20:39
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your suggestions for 'geleidekaart', especially the websites.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Guide passSabineC
4 +1escort pass
Mark Oliver
4travelling companion's railcard
Chris Hopley
4Geleidekaart
Adam Smith


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
escort pass


Explanation:
Just a guess, since I cannot think of a US English equivalent in existence.

Mark Oliver
Local time: 11:39
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof: This is the right term.
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
travelling companion's railcard


Explanation:
In the UK, there is a similar arrangement: the disabled person’s railcard. This gives disabled travellers and a helper a third of train travel (not as generous as the Dutch!).

"The disabled person’s railcard
You can get a railcard if you are deaf, registered blind or getting either disability living allowance (DLA) or severe disablement allowance (SDA). With the railcard you and a friend or helper can get a third off most train travel."
http://www.after16.org.uk/pages/leis2.html

The "helper" is sometimes referred to as a travelling companion: "The card entitles you to one-third off most fares. Wheelchair users and people who are visually impaired travelling with companions get discounts without a card. Companions get the same discount."
http://www.directions-plus.org.uk/publications/dplus_second/...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-14 16:03:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Travelcard\" might be better in your context, as it applies to all public transport, not just trains.


    Reference: http://www.after16.org.uk/pages/leis2.html
    Reference: http://www.directions-plus.org.uk/publications/dplus_second/...
Chris Hopley
Netherlands
Local time: 20:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your suggestions for 'geleidekaart', especially the websites.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Geleidekaart


Explanation:
Another suggestion would be to leave the Dutch untranslated with a brief note of explanation.

In the UK people accompanying a disabled person on public transport are entitled to concessionary fares, but (as far as I know) there is no equivalent of the 'geleidekaart'.

Adam Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Guide pass


Explanation:
The word 'escort'could also be replaced by either 'guide' or 'companion', both being words that are commonly used when referring to the person accompanying a disabled person.

SabineC
Local time: 20:39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AllisonK
2 hrs
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