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The strangest phrase EVER seen!!!!

English translation: Typically British - fighting over peanuts

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19:40 Mar 21, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations / advertising
English term or phrase: The strangest phrase EVER seen!!!!
As I was looking through some tube-ads I noticed a slogan that drove me up to wall: Sorry, it was in Russian, now I will translate it:

Typically British - A Peanut Struggle!!!
It showed too "spicy" peanuts fighting with each other...

I was shocked!!! With all my education and experience in Linguistics I could not understand it? Is it some sort of your cultural knowledge? Is it as allusion to some "Peanut war, struggle, fight, etc."

Please, help me. I feel down in the dumps!!! Not to mention the "target group" !!!
Rostislau Golod
Local time: 18:30
English translation:Typically British - fighting over peanuts
Explanation:
Or could be "Typically English..."
No, I'm a Brit (English) myself and I don't really understand this. But "peanuts" is often used as a scornful term for inadequate pay, as in the saying "pay peanuts and you get monkeys".
I don't myself think fighting over trifles is typically British (or English) and I have never heard us accused of it before, so I've no idea why this should turn up in a Russian ad.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:30
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Fight over trifles
Olga Simon
2 +3Typically British - fighting over peanuts
Jack Doughty
5a peanut fight is a non significant fight.
Michael Deliso
4"British" sense of humour
Piotr Turski
4the strangest people ever beenChris Rowson


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Fight over trifles


Explanation:
My 2 cents.

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Note added at 2002-03-21 20:04:26 (GMT)
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From Merriam Webster:

Main Entry: 2peanut
Function: adjective
Date: 1836
: INSIGNIFICANT, PETTY <peanut politics>

Peanut fight = petty fight = insignificant fight.

Good luck!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-21 20:20:45 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Everything what I said above referrs only to the expression \"peanut fight\".

I do not know what is the connection with \"Typical British\" or \"Typical English\".

Olga Simon
Hungary
Local time: 17:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tatiana Neroni: Looks like a "racial slur" - bashing an alleged "national character", like tight-fistedness. Obviously, was said by a person of non-British nationality...
1 hr
  -> Yeah, I still don't know what does it have to do with the Brits.
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Typically British - fighting over peanuts


Explanation:
Or could be "Typically English..."
No, I'm a Brit (English) myself and I don't really understand this. But "peanuts" is often used as a scornful term for inadequate pay, as in the saying "pay peanuts and you get monkeys".
I don't myself think fighting over trifles is typically British (or English) and I have never heard us accused of it before, so I've no idea why this should turn up in a Russian ad.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory: As another Brit, I have no idea where the British allusion comes from.
2 hrs

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
2 hrs

agree  Sheila Hardie: I agree and I am British too - Scottish:)
22 hrs
  -> I said English, but my paternal grandmother was a Scot.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"British" sense of humour


Explanation:
Maybe the advertisers thought it's an example of British sense of humour?

Piotr Turski
Poland
Local time: 17:30
Native speaker of: Polish
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the strangest people ever been


Explanation:
Well it doesnt strike any chords with me either.

So if it means nothing to me and my fellow Brits above, I though, perhaps it rather says something about Russian thinking?

BUt there you are, University of Minsk, linguist etc., and it doesn´t mean anything to you.

I have concluded that what is really on display here is the wonderful world of marketing.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 17:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
a peanut fight is a non significant fight.


Explanation:
Also I don't believe it says "too" peanuts but "two".check it out better and to it seems that it says two and not too.

Michael Deliso
Local time: 17:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian
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