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whore's hair

English translation: Ballota et/ou Marrubium

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:whore's hair; horehound
English translation:Ballota et/ou Marrubium
Entered by: Claire Chapman
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21:47 Nov 5, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Agriculture
English term or phrase: whore's hair
It is a weed and can grow among /or on/ the Indian corn. It would be good to know a more common English name or the Latin one.
Alex Linosh
horehound = Ballota et/ou Marrubium
Explanation:
This is my guess as to what the plant is supposed to be since I've never heard of the name you give. See the Wiki articles for the complete info.

Horehound is a common name applied to two related genera of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae:
* Ballota
* Marrubium
**The name is of unknown origin, but with the first part 'hore' derived from "hoary", "hairy".** This article deals with the white horehound, Marrubium vulgare, which was widely introduced around the world by European colonists and is now a weed in many countries.
...
Weed
Horehound was introduced to southern Australia in the 19th century as a medicinal herb. It became a weed of native grasslands and pastures where it was introduced with settlers’ livestock, and was first declared under noxious weeds legislation. It now appears to have reached its full potential distribution. It occupies disturbed or overgrazed ground, and is favoured by grazing because it is highly unpalatable to livestock. It may persist in native vegetation that has been grazed, eg. at Wyperfeld National Park in Victoria.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horehound

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballota
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrube_blanc

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Note added at 3 days18 hrs (2007-11-09 16:44:45 GMT) Post-grading
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You're welcome, Alex, and thank you! :-)
Selected response from:

Claire Chapman
Local time: 20:31
Grading comment
Thank you!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3commentKen Cox
1horehound = Ballota et/ou Marrubium
Claire Chapman


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
comment


Explanation:
I assume your question arises from the Stephen King story Children of the Corn (an online copy - probably bootleg - is available at http://www.en8848.com.cn/fiction/Fiction/Horror/200505/717.h... ).

From the context, 'whore's hair' is apparently a weed (as you said).

I can't find anything with google that indicates what other name it might have, but I can say that it must be a vernacular name, and essentially a rude name, so it's unlikely that it would appear very often in print. 'Whore' was not a word used in polite company in the US untll sometime in the late 1960s or early 1970s, and the story was originally published in 1977 (in Penthouse, which might be relevant).

If you reallly need to know, you may have to ask Stephen King.

Ken Cox
Local time: 02:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
horehound = Ballota et/ou Marrubium


Explanation:
This is my guess as to what the plant is supposed to be since I've never heard of the name you give. See the Wiki articles for the complete info.

Horehound is a common name applied to two related genera of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae:
* Ballota
* Marrubium
**The name is of unknown origin, but with the first part 'hore' derived from "hoary", "hairy".** This article deals with the white horehound, Marrubium vulgare, which was widely introduced around the world by European colonists and is now a weed in many countries.
...
Weed
Horehound was introduced to southern Australia in the 19th century as a medicinal herb. It became a weed of native grasslands and pastures where it was introduced with settlers’ livestock, and was first declared under noxious weeds legislation. It now appears to have reached its full potential distribution. It occupies disturbed or overgrazed ground, and is favoured by grazing because it is highly unpalatable to livestock. It may persist in native vegetation that has been grazed, eg. at Wyperfeld National Park in Victoria.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horehound

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballota
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrube_blanc

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days18 hrs (2007-11-09 16:44:45 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You're welcome, Alex, and thank you! :-)

Claire Chapman
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Nov 9, 2007 - Changes made by Claire Chapman:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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