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English translation: architectural landscape elements

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pergola, fence, gate, kiosk, fountain, shed, outbuilding, wall, steps, benches, posts, etc.
English translation:architectural landscape elements
Entered by: juvera
Options:
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19:51 Feb 18, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture
English term or phrase: Please see the question in the explanation box
Hi all,

I would like to know what would be the best English equivalent to describe the variety of landscaping elements such as pergolas, fences, gates, kiosks, benches, pavillions, fountains, sheds, outbuildings, wall elements, posts, ornaments etc etc etc. The Russian expression for all these things literally means "small architectural forms".

So far we have a rather long list of various versions:

1) elements of landscape architecture
2) (elements of) landscape design /landscaping /streetscaping
3) small architectural forms
4) architectural accents
5) architectural ornamentation
6) small architectural projects
7) outdoor structures

Thank you for your comments and suggestions!
Natalie
Poland
Local time: 21:24
architectural ladscape elements, decorative architectural elements
Explanation:
You had the right words, but not quite in the right format. The answer to the largest part of the list in your question is "architectural landscape elements" for fences, gates, walls, fountains, steps, benches, bollards, etc. The larger, more structural ones like pavilions, carports, follies, monuments, large retaining walls would be "outdoor structures". A pergola would fit into either category, depending on it's size or importance. But it isn't important to draw a hard line.
Buildings like sheds, garages, summerhouses would be "outbuildings". Small houses, cottages don't fit into these categories, they are buildings.
You can have indoor or outdoor decorative architectural elements on a building like decorative windows, parapets, fire places, arches, cornices, coffering, etc. Architectural ornamentation is also acceptable, but that would be more appropriate to the decoration of an architectural element, like a decorative panel on top of a door, and not part of the structure or function of a building.
Take it from an (ex)architect who practised for 15 years in the UK.

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Note added at 1 hr 29 mins (2005-02-18 21:20:32 GMT)
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Sorry, \"it\'s\" should be: its

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Note added at 1 hr 31 mins (2005-02-18 21:22:35 GMT)
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And ladscape: landscape

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Note added at 15 hrs 35 mins (2005-02-19 11:26:48 GMT)
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\"Accent\" means a feature which gives a distinctive visual emphasis to something.
So, if you are putting a sculpture, a fountain, a pergola, pavilion or something similar as a focal point into the landscape, then you can call it an architectural accent, equally, you can call it an architectural feature, but there are many architectural elements, which would not be suitable really to be called an accent, like fences, sheds, bollards, etc. A gate can be a focal point, an architectural accent, or you may decide to make it as inconspicuous as possible. So can be steps, walls, benches.
So the accent is not really the collective name of the objects, but describes the purpose the object is being used in the landscape or garden. You can say: These elements are suitable as architectural accents. Or: The architectural accent in this garden is the fountain. But that fountain is still an architectural element, so is the shed behind the bushes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 58 mins (2005-02-19 11:50:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One more thing, in English, there is a tendency to be more specific, less general. So, if you look at the list you provided, virtually all the expressions can be used, for its specific purpose. The least useful ones are 3. 5. and 6., but I will give an example for all of them.
1. The elements of landscape architecture this project is using are: walls, a pergola and a fountain.
2. The elements of streetscaping you can see here are: steps, ramps, raised areas, different coloured pavings and benches.
3. The two rows of urns on pedestals on either side of the walkway are the architectural forms which gives it special identity.
4. Accent... see above.
5. This large expanse of wall needs some architectural ornamentation.
6. The designer has some small architectural project in mind for this spot.
7. Outdoor structures have to withstand the vagaries of the weather.
Selected response from:

juvera
Local time: 20:24
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer and explanations!
Many thanks to everybody who participated in the discussion!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2architectural ladscape elements, decorative architectural elementsjuvera
4 +2garden structuresxxxtazdog
4 +1>>>Maria Chmelarova
5 -1Landscape design/Architect's landscape design/Landscape architectureAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
4outdoor: small architectural formsRefugio
3 +1landscape structures
Mark Nathan


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
please see the question in the explanation box
landscape structures


Explanation:
But you are going to have trouble because in English there are several categories in your list: ornamental landscape architecture, outbuildings and seasonal structures, garden furniture etc and there just isn't one expression to adequately cover all of these.

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 21:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: whoudl you consider using the term "architectural accents" to cover ornamental landscape arch., garden furniture, etc.?
7 hrs
  -> No
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
please see the question in the explanation box
outdoor: small architectural forms


Explanation:
http://www.sabinez.lv/en/parkomp.php
... up the environment elements (pavement, supporting walls, decorative fences, small architectural forms); ... products of the highest quality for landscaping and greening territories. ...www.sabinez.lv/en/parkomp.php - 2k - Cached - More from this site

indoors: architectural elements /embellishments

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Note added at 1 hr 48 mins (2005-02-18 21:39:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Home, Garden and Landscaping Show 2003 -- statistics
... Aspects of interest. Small architectural forms/Garden sculpture ... Furniture for garden and parks. 7.6% ...www.hgl-russia.ru/fact2_e.html - 16k - Cached - More from this site

JS Eldzhernon Plus Ltd. : Wood houses, gardenwares, round posts.
... children\'s play huts and playgrounds, small architectural forms, garden furniture and various round posts. ... creates the effect of large inner space irrespective of small dimensions. ...www.eldzhernon.com/production.htm - 6k - Cached - More from this site

Refugio
Local time: 12:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Vladimir Dubisskiy: your link is not relevant, sorry, as this site is from Latvia and most likely was translated into English from Russian; so they "small arch..forms" which is a literal w/by/word translation of Russian term.CAN YOU PLS PROVIDE ANY ENGLISH MONOL. REF?
40 mins
  -> My answer has nothing to do with Latvian or Russian translations. It is the expression used in English for "pergolas, fences, gates, kiosks, benches, pavillions, fountains, sheds, outbuildings, wall elements, posts, ornaments, etc."
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
please see the question in the explanation box
Landscape design/Architect's landscape design/Landscape architecture


Explanation:
Try this: Lanndscape architecture is quite good...

Landscape Graphics: Plan, Section, and Perspective Drawing Landscape Spaces
de Grant W. Reid
Habituellement expédié sous 10 à 12 jours
Watson-Guptill Publications
Broché - 216 pages
Revised edition (septembre 2002)
Notre prix : EUR 20,45
Neuf à partir de EUR 15,81

Cliquez ici pour plus d'infos Aucun commentaire client
Soyez le premier à donner votre avis sur cet article


Book Description
Announcing the new revised edition of the classic industry reference! Landscape Graphics is the architect's ultimate guide to all the basic graphics techniques used in landscape design and landscape architecture. Progressing from the basics into more sophisticated techniques, this guide offers... Lire la suite



Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 21:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lawyer-Linguist: landscape architecture - sorry to have to change the rating but Juvera seems to be right after further reading
46 mins

disagree  juvera: Landscape architecture is a much broader concept, it means the design and formation of the whole landscape of a particular area. That includes soft and hard landscaping, and yes, architectural elements too.
2 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
please see the question in the explanation box
garden structures


Explanation:
I've found quite a few refs. to support this term, for example:

Garden Structures is the name of a book here...

Equal parts wish book and how-to, Garden Structures marries inspiration with the nitty-gritty of design, materials, and methods to help every gardener create and carry out plans that will transform dirt, plants, and dreams into an outdoor home. Illustrated with over 200 exquisite color photographs and instructional line drawings, Garden Structures ranges from the simplest to the most involved ways to create a framework on which a garden grows. Here are structures to define boundaries: gates, fences, walls, edgings. Structures that give a garden lift: trellises, arbors, pergolas. Structures, such as paths and walkways, that shape the garden underfoot. And structures for living: patios, decks, terraces, greenhouses. Complementing each section are dozens of sidebars, from "Bamboo Barriers" to "What to Plant Between the Cracks" to "The Osage Orange" and "Paving Particulars."
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0761114068/002-090966...


ARCHITECTURE, INTERIORS, GARDEN STRUCTURES:
Residential architecture—a substantial collection of existing photos of homess, grand and modest, seaside and mountainside, interiors and exteriors,with their natural surroundings, available selectively for editorial or promotional use, gazebos, pergolas, trellises, patios, stone-walls, fences, decks, pools, "Green design," greenhouses, all styles of buildings, houses & interior design, Vernacular architecture
http://bobperron.com/StockList.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 16 mins (2005-02-19 06:07:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ruth is right...in the U.S. \"garden\" usually means the place for flowers or vegetables and excludes the lawn area. There are similar refs. to \"garden and yard structures\" or simply \"yard structures\";

While landscaping is generally not subject to review by the Commission, the following are subject to review and approval by the Commission: changes to grade, outside HVAC equipment (excluding window units), and yard structures, including, but not limited to, fences, swimming pools, play houses and pergolas, etc.
http://www.town.arlington.ma.us/Public_Documents/ArlingtonMA...

Yard Structures -- Flagpoles, trellises, garden benches, windmills, wind vanes, wishing wells, birdbaths, birdhouses, fountains, seasonal greenhouses, and barbecue gills.
http://www.rpcia.com/ACC_Guidelines.pdf

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 21:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: this is good, but is an expression less used in the United States
7 mins
  -> true, in the U.S. you'd have to include "yard", I think (see above)

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: would you use the term "architectural accents' to cover the array of "garden structures'? THANK YOU, that's what i thought - fits my answer completely!
7 hrs
  -> "architectural accents" is a broader term, as (from what I've seen) it can cover things like columns, moldings, chair rails, ceiling tiles, ceiling beams, medallions, doors, windowsills, cabinets, shelves, etc.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
please see the question in the explanation box
architectural ladscape elements, decorative architectural elements


Explanation:
You had the right words, but not quite in the right format. The answer to the largest part of the list in your question is "architectural landscape elements" for fences, gates, walls, fountains, steps, benches, bollards, etc. The larger, more structural ones like pavilions, carports, follies, monuments, large retaining walls would be "outdoor structures". A pergola would fit into either category, depending on it's size or importance. But it isn't important to draw a hard line.
Buildings like sheds, garages, summerhouses would be "outbuildings". Small houses, cottages don't fit into these categories, they are buildings.
You can have indoor or outdoor decorative architectural elements on a building like decorative windows, parapets, fire places, arches, cornices, coffering, etc. Architectural ornamentation is also acceptable, but that would be more appropriate to the decoration of an architectural element, like a decorative panel on top of a door, and not part of the structure or function of a building.
Take it from an (ex)architect who practised for 15 years in the UK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 29 mins (2005-02-18 21:20:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, \"it\'s\" should be: its

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 31 mins (2005-02-18 21:22:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And ladscape: landscape

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 35 mins (2005-02-19 11:26:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Accent\" means a feature which gives a distinctive visual emphasis to something.
So, if you are putting a sculpture, a fountain, a pergola, pavilion or something similar as a focal point into the landscape, then you can call it an architectural accent, equally, you can call it an architectural feature, but there are many architectural elements, which would not be suitable really to be called an accent, like fences, sheds, bollards, etc. A gate can be a focal point, an architectural accent, or you may decide to make it as inconspicuous as possible. So can be steps, walls, benches.
So the accent is not really the collective name of the objects, but describes the purpose the object is being used in the landscape or garden. You can say: These elements are suitable as architectural accents. Or: The architectural accent in this garden is the fountain. But that fountain is still an architectural element, so is the shed behind the bushes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 58 mins (2005-02-19 11:50:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One more thing, in English, there is a tendency to be more specific, less general. So, if you look at the list you provided, virtually all the expressions can be used, for its specific purpose. The least useful ones are 3. 5. and 6., but I will give an example for all of them.
1. The elements of landscape architecture this project is using are: walls, a pergola and a fountain.
2. The elements of streetscaping you can see here are: steps, ramps, raised areas, different coloured pavings and benches.
3. The two rows of urns on pedestals on either side of the walkway are the architectural forms which gives it special identity.
4. Accent... see above.
5. This large expanse of wall needs some architectural ornamentation.
6. The designer has some small architectural project in mind for this spot.
7. Outdoor structures have to withstand the vagaries of the weather.

juvera
Local time: 20:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer and explanations!
Many thanks to everybody who participated in the discussion!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov: I just wonder if "small-scale architectural elements" will do? + A curious coincidence is that at a site devoted to Peterhof they speak of "small-scale elements" (in English): www.peterhof.org/parks/ind10.html
19 mins
  -> Thanks Kirill, yes, but it depends. + That's funny. I enjoyed browsing through the website. It is relative: compared with the Marly Cascade, the Shell fountain is tiny. Or the "small" buildings compared to the palaces. :-)

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: is it possible to use the term "architectural accents" here? THANK YOU! Absolutely fits into my understanding and thus my point.
7 hrs
  -> Thank you. Good question, see the answer above.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
please see the question in the explanation box
>>>


Explanation:
I am a gardener, besides other interests of mine....
and, just a while ago I was looking through some magazines, get some idea, what pergola we might build in our garden this spring.

Helping you with your question, it is not one word or expression for outside structures and make everybody happy.
For pergolas, fences, gates, kiosks ( garden sheds ) usually are called ; outdoor structures.
For pavillions, outbuildings ( greenhouses, kids garden play houses ),
usually are introduce as architectural projects
fountains, walls, benches, wall elements, posts, ornaments are called gardening ( garden) accents.
In my opinion " outdoor structures and accents " would be fine.
Perhaps "garden ( landscape ) structures and accents. Good luck.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 hrs 12 mins (2005-02-19 14:04:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Using word accents is very popular in USA English almost for anything for decoration, outside, inside, for dresses and etc. So that is fine with wall hangigs, fences and fence hangings including baskets, flower pots, bird houses, benches, gerden sheds... and etc.

\"Architectural accents\" for most of elements I might have slight problem with that, because under word architecrtural I always see an architecs behind. The truth is, builing bench, fence,pergola, trelis, garden house, you do not need to be and architect. Trained carpenter might do that easily or some skill husbands ( like mine ) that is not problem for him. But biger structure (greenhouse, more sophisticated garden sheds, some of them might need blue prints, which they are drawn in architects facilities.

To make yourself comfortable and clients as well, I would go with \"architectural structures and accents.\" Perhaps \"outdood structures and accents \" and having some underline explanation, depends on whole text, or for who you do translation.

Never indoor accents, because it is meant for inside decoration only.

Sorry for some typo.

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 15:24
Native speaker of: Slovak

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: Thank you! So you do not mind mind using "accents". Would you consider using 'architectural accents' to cover the most of elements you've mentioned? COOL. Your answer basically fits into my thought pattern :-)))
6 hrs
  -> You welcome. Please read more above. It is not enough space here.
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