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the worm must taste the fish and not the angler

English translation: No, I don´t think it is correct.

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22:20 Jun 4, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: the worm must taste the fish and not the angler
Twenty years ago, this phrase meant that worms were supposed to taste fishes and tell you which one they wanted for supper and anglers were just not available that day.

This understanding of "the worm must taste the fish" or "this word translates well in German" is quite new, say less than five years. Is this correct?
fcl
France
Local time: 18:37
English translation:No, I don´t think it is correct.
Explanation:
I couldn´t make any sense of this (worms don´t usually eat fish!) until I looked around a bit, and found the saying "The worm must taste good *to* the fish and not the angler".

I have to admit that it is not familiar to me, and I notice that none of the references I find with Google are from Americans or English - see my first ref. for a German quoting it, last year.

But at least it makes sense like this: the idea is that the fish should take the worm, it is irrelevant whether it tastes good to the angler.

The German quoting it was saying that VW cars have to be tempting to the customer, not to the manufacturer.

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Note added at 2002-06-05 08:08:24 (GMT)
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It took me a while to realise that I have also added the word \"good\" - without this we have \"The worm must taste to the fish ... \", which isn´t really English, and could well be a bad translation from the German \"Der Wurm muß dem Fisch schmecken\".

As regards a connection with translation into German, I am not aware of any, although I am a translator living in Germany. Nor is my (German) wife, who is also very language aware.
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:37
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5No, I don´t think it is correct.Chris Rowson
4YES !!! Absolutely...
MikeGarcia


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
YES !!! Absolutely...


Explanation:
Votre information est tout a fait correcte.
Toutes mes congratulations!!!


    Reference: http://mgarciauriburu@yahoo.com.ar
    Reference: http://mikegarcia@language.proz.com
MikeGarcia
Spain
Local time: 18:37
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 20
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
No, I don´t think it is correct.


Explanation:
I couldn´t make any sense of this (worms don´t usually eat fish!) until I looked around a bit, and found the saying "The worm must taste good *to* the fish and not the angler".

I have to admit that it is not familiar to me, and I notice that none of the references I find with Google are from Americans or English - see my first ref. for a German quoting it, last year.

But at least it makes sense like this: the idea is that the fish should take the worm, it is irrelevant whether it tastes good to the angler.

The German quoting it was saying that VW cars have to be tempting to the customer, not to the manufacturer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-05 08:08:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It took me a while to realise that I have also added the word \"good\" - without this we have \"The worm must taste to the fish ... \", which isn´t really English, and could well be a bad translation from the German \"Der Wurm muß dem Fisch schmecken\".

As regards a connection with translation into German, I am not aware of any, although I am a translator living in Germany. Nor is my (German) wife, who is also very language aware.


    Reference: http://money.cnn.com/2001/09/07/europe/vw/?related
Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxtazdog: yes, your version makes sense; the other one doesn't.
31 mins

agree  jerrie: Excellent...it now makes sense!
1 hr

agree  John Kinory: Yup ... I spent Saturday mornings at the laundrette, until I discovered Chris' explanation. Now you know it makes sense!
5 hrs
  -> Remember, it´s the early fish that gets the bird.

agree  Trudy Peters
1 day19 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: "The worm must taste good *to* the fish and not *to* the angler"
2 days14 hrs
  -> It works OK with only the first "to", too.
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