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Help me uncover hidden for me connotations

English translation: to stink

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to ming (Brit. English, slang)
English translation:to stink
Entered by: Libero_Lang_Lab
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12:04 Aug 23, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / name origination and connotation
English term or phrase: Help me uncover hidden for me connotations
Are there any negative connotations in the following Russian name: Mingazov (Ìèíãàçîâ) pronounced Minguzoff. Please look and listen at/to it as a native English (French,German,Spanish,Chinese,Japanese) speaker and give me your opinion. Thanks.
Rafale
Uzbekistan
Local time: 09:50
well - if you look hard enough...
Explanation:
... I suppose you could find something to snigger about as an English speaker.

In UK slang - ming means to smell. It's minging means it stinks. And from this has come the term "minger" - more usually used as a derogatory term of reference for a girl of dubious sexual morals... very similar to "slapper"... but even more offensive I would say.

In Chinese, by contrast, I guess it probably has quite a regal connotation!
Selected response from:

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:50
Grading comment
Thank you Dan for being supportive.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +8well - if you look hard enough...
Libero_Lang_Lab
5 +1NoHerman Vilella
4 +1Little problem for Argentina´s Spanish
aivars
4German: no hidden meaning
Klaus Herrmann
3 +1There's also Italian to worry about...cheungmo
3i never even tried to hide my commentsxxxsergey


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
well - if you look hard enough...


Explanation:
... I suppose you could find something to snigger about as an English speaker.

In UK slang - ming means to smell. It's minging means it stinks. And from this has come the term "minger" - more usually used as a derogatory term of reference for a girl of dubious sexual morals... very similar to "slapper"... but even more offensive I would say.

In Chinese, by contrast, I guess it probably has quite a regal connotation!

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:50
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 137
Grading comment
Thank you Dan for being supportive.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  5Q
2 mins

agree  Sara Noss: Minging can also mean filthy, or ugly when used to describe a person. :-(
7 mins
  -> Yes - anyone who watched Big Brother will have seen Jade crowned queen of the mingers by the 80% of the British public who seemed so obsessed with this programme

agree  Catherine Bolton: Gosh! Ming and minger and minging -- makes me glad I'm American. No such connotation for us!
30 mins
  -> Definitely one to be avoided this side of the pond

agree  Irene Chernenko: Despite the high-minded comments below, people still snigger at those they feel they can laugh at - it is a human trait, I'm afraid. Like the rather shameful fascination with Clinton's love life.
57 mins
  -> right - it would be better if it wasn't so - but no-one wants the added grief of infantile ridicule if it can be avoided

agree  John Kinory: I see Sergey has decided to hide his racist comments. Good riddance to bad rubbish, I say.
1 hr
  -> ...

agree  aivars: damm Dan, you erased a superb quote from Churchill could you repost it and ellaborate on it I am not so sure of the meaning but I liked it
1 hr
  -> Lady Astor to Churchill: If I was your wife I'd put poison in your tea. Churchill to Astor: If I was your husband, I'd drink it. Meaning: He would make such an awful husband that she'd kill him...his retort - she'd be such an awful wife he'd want to die!

agree  jerrie: I agree with the 'if you look hard enough'. My 14 year old daughter would find anything with 'ming' in it, hysterical. However, if I was introduced to someone by the name of Mingazov I would not make the same association!
1 hr
  -> Quite Jerrie - unfortunately there are a lot of adults out there with the mental age and humour of a 14 year-old (no disrespect to your daughter) - over to you Sergey

agree  Yuri Geifman: love your Dublin accent... LOL
2 hrs
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
No


Explanation:
Hidden connotations in names have been passé ever since people started calling themselves y nicknames. Even if your surname happened to be shitoff and it were writtn in your busines card, people would be calling you by your preferred nme. Example of a calling card for Igor Shitoff: "Igor (Mike) Shitoff, Vice President". That's ll you would ned, nd you would have to let people crhsitn you that wy. Bad name/surname connotations are for school kids or people out of your class.

Herman Vilella
Local time: 06:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Libero_Lang_Lab: That's all very well Herman, but if your surname was, lets say Viagra and not Vilella, you might feel differently :-)). Anyway, I bet Mr Shitoff got pissedoff and sentoff for a new Signoff.
4 mins

agree  xxxsergey: no, ignore the english speaking world, keep the name, they are only anglo-saxons - germans, originating somewhere in prussia, present day holland, i think
18 mins

neutral  John Kinory: Goodness knows what Sergey is saying: his grasp of geography, history and English grammar are dubious, and the sense is pretty racist. Agree with Dan.
1 hr

neutral  Irene Chernenko: "Ignore the English-speaking world". My goodness - easier said than done. I was at a conference with a Korean scientist by the name of Dr Dong... Need I say more?
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Little problem for Argentina´s Spanish


Explanation:
Minga, can mean "fuck off" or "go to hell" in Argentina slang, this being a very known word here.

Additionally, "Mingo" is Domingo Cavallo’s nickname (an economist who among other concoctions created the bank block, aka "corralito" an economic mess), so a nickname Mingo is strongly discouraged.

So, Mingazoff would a bit funny in the Rio de la Plata. Just a bit, let´s say, but it would be hard to sell anything here anyway.

Still, everyone’s name must be funny somewhere. My own name Aivars, was easily associated with "Eiweiss" when I was living in Germany. You cannot please everybody sometimes.


aivars
Argentina
Local time: 01:50
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: Lady Astor: If you were my husband, I'd poison your tea. Churchill: If I were your husband, I'd be glad to drink it.
14 mins
  -> I totally misunderstood it first, terrific ammunition

agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: aivars as you seem to like lit. quotes: the one u invoke is from Barnum - the circus impresario - who said: you can please some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time..
26 mins
  -> cool, you have always an ace up your sleeve
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
German: no hidden meaning


Explanation:
No obvious problems, no hidden meaning.



Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 06:50
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 147
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
There's also Italian to worry about...


Explanation:
"Minga" in the version of Italian spoken in Montreal, specifically in Saint Leonard, means "my balls" (my testicles) and is used to add emphasis. As in "Minga! Me, I really like that girl". I don't know if this applies throughout Italy though.

cheungmo
PRO pts in pair: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: It's a minefield out there...
4 mins
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
i never even tried to hide my comments


Explanation:
you hid them!
and they are not racist! i hate noone!

but when you listen to what the welsh and scots have to say, you can understand the feelings towards the english.


agree John Kinory: I see Sergey has decided to hide his racist comments. Good riddance to bad rubbish, I say.

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Note added at 2002-08-24 06:29:49 (GMT) Post-grading
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my sentence was meant to be amusing, sarcastic though - i agree, but no offence was meant. still don\'t understand how it could be seen racist. we often make jokes like that with my friends just for a laugh.

\"adults out there with the mental age and humour of a 14 year-old\" is much more personal and offending i would say.

xxxsergey
Local time: 05:50
PRO pts in pair: 84
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