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wallows

English translation: some more definitions

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02:51 Oct 16, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: wallows
wallows
alvaro
English translation:some more definitions
Explanation:
Main Entry:1wallow
Pronunciation:*w*-(*)l*
Function:intransitive verb
Etymology:Middle English walwen, from Old English wealwian to roll more at VOLUBLE
Date:before 12th century

1 : to roll oneself about in an indolent or ungainly manner
2 : to billow forth : SURGE
3 : to devote oneself entirely; especially : to take unrestrained pleasure : DELIGHT
4 a : to become abundantly supplied : LUXURIATE *a family that wallows in money* b : to indulge oneself immoderately *wallowing in self-pity*
5 : to become or remain helpless *allowed them to wallow in their ignorance*
–wallower \*w*-l*-w*r\ noun

Main Entry:2wallow
Function:noun
Date:15th century

1 : an act or instance of wallowing
2 a : a muddy area or one filled with dust used by animals for wallowing b : a depression formed by or as if by the wallowing of animals
3 : a state of degradation or degeneracy

Merriam-Webster dictionary

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-16 05:08:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course more context, even just one or two words surrounding your \"wallows\" would help us help you!
Selected response from:

Jennie Sherrick, MA
United States
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +12some more definitions
Jennie Sherrick, MA
5 +1Since there's no context whatsoever, here's some more possibilities
Christopher Crockett
5one more definitionHerman Vilella
1 +1revolcarse, nadar
María del Carmen Cerda


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
revolcarse, nadar


Explanation:
1.- of a ship : to roll and struggle ina rough sea 2.- to move or roll about in deep mud like wallow in the mud 3.- the act of wallowing 4.- a place where animals come to wallow
LONGMAN DICTIONARY

María del Carmen Cerda
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Arthur Borges: Agree but is Alvaro asking for a translation?
4 mins

neutral  John Kinory: This is English (monolingual) - an explanation is being requested.
17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +12
some more definitions


Explanation:
Main Entry:1wallow
Pronunciation:*w*-(*)l*
Function:intransitive verb
Etymology:Middle English walwen, from Old English wealwian to roll more at VOLUBLE
Date:before 12th century

1 : to roll oneself about in an indolent or ungainly manner
2 : to billow forth : SURGE
3 : to devote oneself entirely; especially : to take unrestrained pleasure : DELIGHT
4 a : to become abundantly supplied : LUXURIATE *a family that wallows in money* b : to indulge oneself immoderately *wallowing in self-pity*
5 : to become or remain helpless *allowed them to wallow in their ignorance*
–wallower \*w*-l*-w*r\ noun

Main Entry:2wallow
Function:noun
Date:15th century

1 : an act or instance of wallowing
2 a : a muddy area or one filled with dust used by animals for wallowing b : a depression formed by or as if by the wallowing of animals
3 : a state of degradation or degeneracy

Merriam-Webster dictionary

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-16 05:08:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course more context, even just one or two words surrounding your \"wallows\" would help us help you!


    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/
Jennie Sherrick, MA
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bryan Crumpler: of course, some more context would narrow this down
56 mins
  -> Very true.

agree  Clair@Lexeme
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  Gayle Wallimann
2 hrs

agree  Jacqueline McKay
3 hrs

agree  jerrie
4 hrs

agree  airmailrpl
4 hrs

agree  Sheila Hardie
5 hrs

agree  Jack Doughty: As the Hippopotamus Song says: "Follow me, follow, down to the hollow, and there let us wallow in glorious mud!"
6 hrs
  -> We were thinking of the same song this time! :) "Mud, mud, glorious mud..."

agree  Sarah Ponting
7 hrs

agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
8 hrs
  -> Thanks everyone

agree  NancyLynn
1 day12 hrs

agree  xxxKanta Rawat
5 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
one more definition


Explanation:
hosar, hosa (de hocico).

That's when the pig wallows in mud.

"En el desierto no comas cerdo, pues hosa en aguas que no son de lluvia"

Herman Vilella
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: This is English (monolingual)
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Since there's no context whatsoever, here's some more possibilities


Explanation:
A bit of The Oxford English Dictionary on the subject, with a few of the usual facinating instances of use :

WALLOW :

(noun)
1. A mud-hole or dust-hole formed by the wallowing of a buffalo, elephant, or rhinoceros. Also transf.

1882 Contemp. Rev. Aug. 229 The wallows are saucer-like depressions in the ground, made by the buffaloes rubbing themselves.

c. fig. A state of depression or stagnation.

1975 Bookseller 3 May 2380/2 Lifting the Sunday Times novel reviews out of the terrible wallows they have been in for the last few years.

(verb)

I. Intransitive senses.
[obsolete sense]
1. Of a round object (a stone, a wheel): To roll (along the ground); to move by revolving or rotating. Only in OE. Hence fig. of a thought: To revolve or be turned over in the mind. Obs.

Circa 888 Ælfred Boeth. vi, Ðonne þær micel stan wealwiende of þam heohan munte oninnan fealð;

Ælfred Boeth. xxxix. Sect.7 Þa fel(asg)a þeah hongiað on þæm spacan, þeah hi eallunga wealowi(asg)en on þære eorðan;


2.
a. Of a person or animal: To roll about, toss or tumble from side to side, while lying down or stretched out. Now rare exc. as in 3.

Circa 900 Bæda's Hist; iii. ix. (1890) 178 [Ðæt hors] ongon wealwian & on æ(asg)hwæðre siidan hit (asg)elomlice oferwearp;

Circa 1386 Chaucer Wife's T. 229 Whan he was with his wyf abedde ybroght, He walweth and he turneth to and fro.

1388 Wyclif Mark ix. 19 [20] He was throw doun to grounde, and walewide, and fomede.

1881 Jowett Thucyd. i. 127 The dead lay as they had died, one upon another, while others hardly alive wallowed [ekalindounto] in the streets.

[obsolete sense]
b. said of persons wrestling together. Obs.

Circa 1386 Chaucer Reeve's T. 358 And in the floor, with nose and mouth to-broke, They walwe, as doon two pigges in a poke.

1400 Morte Arth. 1142 Wrothely thai wrythyn and wrystill to-gederz, Welters and walowes ouer with-in thase buskez.
Malory Arthur v. v. 168 Thenne Arthur weltred and wrong, that he was other whyle vnder and another tyme aboue, And so weltryng and walowynge they rolled doune the hylle.


c. To move about heavily or clumsily; to go along with a rolling or floundering gait.

1576 Turberv. Venerie lxxvii. 216 They [i.e. bears] go somtimes a galloppe, & somtimes an amble: but when they wallow then they go at moste ease;

1599 Marston Ant. & Mel; v. (1602) I 1, When I see..another wallowe in a greate sloppe, I mistrust the proportion of his thigh.

1609 W. M. Man in Moone, Glutton E 2, Now he approacheth wallowing like a woman with childe.

[obsolete sense]
d. To flounder in speech. Obs.

3. To roll about, or lie prostrate and relaxed in or upon some liquid, viscous, or yielding substance (e.g. mire, blood, water, dust, sand). Often implying sensual enjoyment or indifference to defilement. Usu. with in.

1593 Shaks. Rich. II, i. iii. 298 Or Wallow naked in December snow.
1699 Dampier Voy. ii. iii. v. 48 'Tis reported the Commanders do keep Bathing-Troughs full of Water to lye and wallow in.

1791 Cowper Odyss. x. 391 Hence-seek the sty. There wallow with thy friends.

1838 Dickens O. Twist viii, Little knots of houses, where drunken men and women were positively wallowing in filth.

4. Of a ship: To roll from side to side; to sail with a rolling motion; to roll helplessly in the trough of the waves. +Of a floating object: To be tossed about.

5. Of the sea, waves: To roll, surge, heave, toss. Of wind: To whirl, blow gustily. Of a liquid: To spout, gush; to spring or well up. Of flame, smoke, vapour: To surge up.

1913 Eng. Rev. Nov. 514 The smoke-funnel tottered, then fell thundering upon the deck... Enormous clouds of steam wallowed up from below.

6. fig. (cf. sense 3).
a. To remain plunged in the mire of sensuality, degraded habits, or the like; `to live in any state of filth or gross vice' (J.); to take delight in gross pleasures or a demoralizing way of life. Usu. with in.

1513 Fabyan Chron. vi. cxcviii. (1811) 204 He walowed in lechery.

1577 Wolton Cast. Christians H j, Some of them..do wallowe and tumble in al kinde of wickednesse.

1611 Bible Ecclus. xxiii. 12 The godly..shall not wallow in their sinnes.

1722 De Foe Col. Jack (1840) 180, I wallowed in sloth and voluptuous ease.


[obsolete sense]
b. To be involved in (error, self-will); to be immersed or engrossed in (some occupation, activity, etc.); to go in and out, be busy among (a body of persons). Obs.


c. To abound or `roll' in (wealth, possessions). Chiefly with contemptuous implication. ? Obs.

1610 Holland Camden's Brit. (1637) 742 Egelricke..found such a mighty masse of money buried within the ground..that, wallowing now in wealth, he gave over his Bishopricke.

1679 Shadwell True Widow iii. 37 My Lady wallows in money, she knows not what to do with it.


d. jocular. To give oneself up unrestrainedly to enjoyment; to revel in.

1876 Mark Twain Tom Sawyer x. 97 But if ever I get off this time, I lay I'll just waller in Sunday-schools!

1881 Mark Twain Lett. to Publishers (1967) 136 The Earl's literary excrement charmed me like Fanny Hill. I just wallowed in it.


II. Transitive senses (chiefly causative).

[obsolete sense]
7. To cause (a rounded object) to roll on the ground; to trundle. Also with adv., as away, to. Also, to carry forth, transport. Obs.


[obsolete sense]
8. To cause (a person or animal) to roll or toss about; to cause to lie prostrate or immersed (in some liquid or sticky substance). Chiefly refl. and pass. Also fig. Obs.

1611 Bible Jer. vi. 26 Gird thee with sackcloth, and wallowe thy selfe in ashes.

1673 Lady's Call. Pref. 3 How can a soul that remembers its celestial extraction, wallow itself in the mire.


[obsolete sense]
9. To cause (the sea) to roll or toss. Obs.


[obsolete sense]
10. With complement: ? To make (dirty) by wallowing. Obs.

1573-80 Tusser Husb. (1878) 191 All dirt and mire some wallow bed, as spanniels vse to doo.

Hence 'wallowing vbl. sb. and ppl. a. 'wallowingly adv.

1642 Milton Apol. Smect. Wks. 1851 III. 317 We cry out Sacriledge and misdevotion against those who in zeale have demolish't the dens and cages of her uncleane wallowings.

1684 Lond. Gaz. No. 1906/4 She [a mare] hath a wallowing pace.


Etc.


Christopher Crockett
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 124

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
1 day19 mins
  -> With *all* of it ? Thanks, NancyLynn.
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