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GONNA

English translation: going to

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:GONNA
English translation:going to
Entered by: jerrie
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

17:51 Jan 8, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: GONNA
gonna
JOSE
going to
Explanation:
I'm gonna...

Or you're a gonna (goner)...you're dead, out of here

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Note added at 2003-01-08 17:58:16 (GMT)
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Jennifer Lopez featuring Nas - I\'m Gonna Be Alright
(I\'m going to be alright)

I\'m Gonna Getcha Good: Shania Twain.
(I\'m going to get you good)






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Note added at 2003-01-08 18:02:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\'gonna\' is listed in my 1983 Chambers dictionary....

(esp USA) a coll. contraction of going to

...so, it\'s been around for a while, and being used more!
Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:39
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +19going to
jerrie
5 +4A colloq. (esp. U.S;) or vulgar pronunciation of "going to"
Christopher Crockett
5 +4Gonna is a perfect spelling for the sound of "going to" asHerman Vilella
4 +5going toNancy Arrowsmith
5 +2Note to ChristopherChris Rowson


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +19
going to


Explanation:
I'm gonna...

Or you're a gonna (goner)...you're dead, out of here

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 17:58:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Jennifer Lopez featuring Nas - I\'m Gonna Be Alright
(I\'m going to be alright)

I\'m Gonna Getcha Good: Shania Twain.
(I\'m going to get you good)






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:02:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\'gonna\' is listed in my 1983 Chambers dictionary....

(esp USA) a coll. contraction of going to

...so, it\'s been around for a while, and being used more!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marion Burns
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Maria Rosich Andreu
0 min
  -> Thanks

neutral  Christopher Crockett: "going to" yes, but goner?
5 mins
  -> OK, forget the 'goner' :-)

agree  Nikita Kobrin
5 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Alaa Zeineldine
10 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  NancyLynn
12 mins

agree  xxxEDLING
18 mins

agree  Yelena.
20 mins

agree  Enza Longo
24 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting
27 mins

agree  cillegio
29 mins

agree  Emilia Carneiro
1 hr

agree  Drak
1 hr

agree  Refugio: The goner is a goner. Going to.
1 hr
  -> Thanks!!!

agree  Claudia Andreani
1 hr

agree  Jack Doughty: And a much older song, from South Pacific: "I'm gonna wash that man right outa my hair!"
1 hr
  -> Thanks Jack. I was only singing that the other day! Really!!

agree  Rusinterp
1 day10 hrs

agree  Dolly Xu
2 days11 hrs

agree  airmailrpl
5 days

agree  kaalema: definite going to, never hear goner!
15 days
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
going to


Explanation:
a colloquial, shortened form, usually considered very ungrammatical, but used in direct speech.
I'm gonna go get you
I'm gonna go out and get me some booze, etc.

Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 02:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christopher Crockett: *Usually* considered ungrammatical ??
3 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: Yes, usually! I consider it modern, colloquial spoken grammar. Grammar can only describe what people say and write, it has never succeeded in prescribing. I didn´t learn English from a book, I learned it from what I heard and read. :-)
12 mins

agree  xxxEDLING
17 mins

agree  Refugio
1 hr

agree  Claudia Andreani
1 hr

agree  Rusinterp
1 day10 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Gonna is a perfect spelling for the sound of "going to" as


Explanation:
pronounced by very, very large numbers of Americans with no ulterior motive. It's not foul language. I don't use it very much because I'm always in class, interpreting languages, or trying to impress drunks at the corner bar. But I've had occasion to use it many times, especially when trying to sound funny-angry, such as in "if the waiter does that again, I'm gonna hang'im!"

Herman Vilella
Local time: 10:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, I don't know why the O.E.D. considers it "vulgar." Are your local drunks easily impressed, Herman?
3 mins

agree  Marion Burns: Yes, very common in colloquial, informal use; often more effective or forceful than "going to"--as in, "I'm gonna get you!" (The OED is a wonderful resource, but often rather snobby)
21 mins

agree  Refugio
1 hr

agree  Nikita Kobrin
2 days20 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
A colloq. (esp. U.S;) or vulgar pronunciation of "going to"


Explanation:
--gonna go(hook).n<e>, colloq. (esp. U.S;) or vulgar pronunciation of going to (see go v. 47 b). Cf. the earlier Sc. ganna, gaunna: see Eng. Dial. Dict. s.v. Go, quots. 1806, etc.

1913 C. E. Mulford Coming of Cassidy ix. 149 Yo're gonna get a good lickin'.

1929 E. W. Springs Above Bright Blue Sky 136, 5684 has a busted cylinder. Gonna put a new motor in it.

1952 A. Baron With Hope, Farewell 56 Put 'em all in clover, that's what I'm gonna do.

1967 M. Shulman Kill 3 ii. iv. 81 I'm gonna keep on yelling tell you let me out.

--going to (with active or pass. inf.): on the way to, preparing or tending to. Now used as a more colloquial synonym of about to, in the auxiliaries of idiomatic compound tenses expressing immediate or near futurity.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:07:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t know what to call this sort of word, but perhaps someone has an idea --it\'s not just a colloquialism, it\'s a matter of orthography more closely immitating speech, like \"squeet\" for \"let\'s go eat,\" or Woody Allen\'s famous \"No, dju?\" for \"No, JEW.\"

A phonologism ??

No, that can\'t be right, since it\'s not in the OED.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:08:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ain\'t anybody gonna help me out here?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:13:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note to Chris :

\"...modern, colloquial spoken grammar. Grammar can only describe what people say and write, it has never succeeded in prescribing.\"

Nutz.

\"GRAMMAR : That department of the study of a language which deals with its inflexional forms or other means of indicating the relations of words in the sentence, and with the rules for employing these...\"

Otherwise All Things are Lawful, and down that road there be Dragons, Chris.

Just because Duhbya sez it doan\'t make it grammer.

Much less true.

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Note added at 2003-01-08 18:39:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Snobby or not, here\'s the OED on \"goner\" :

GONE : Those who are dead.

1908 Daily Chron. 13 May 3/3 Unconscious imitations of Browning and others of the great and the gone.

1914 Hardy Satires of Circumstance 52 The speakers, sundry phantoms of the gone.

--Hence \'goner slang, one who is dead or undone; something which is doomed or ended.

1850 Dow, Jr. in Sunday Mercury (N.Y.) 6 Jan. 2/6 Last Monday..the old year was not quite a goner.

1854 M. J. Holmes Tempest & Sunshine v. 211 I\'d soon give you up as a goner.

1857 Thoreau Maine W. (1894) 365 He exclaimed, `She is a goner!\'..There, to be sure, she lay perfectly dead.

1891 Nat. Gould Double Event 261 Make a noise, or follow me, and you\'re a goner.

1930 E. Bramah Little Flutter xiii. 153 If it failed he was-if one may be permitted the word in the excitement of the moment-a `goner\'.

1933 Boys\' Mag. XLVII. 124/2 When I found the car burnt out I thought you were a `goner\'.

1945 Auden For Time Being 12 Rome will be a goner.


Of course, since there are no rules that we have to follow, we can just say and do any damned thing we want and to hell with it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:44:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Then, of course, there\'s \"goinna\" (pronounced \"gwanna\"), a regional variant of \"gonna\" from the Southern U.S.

As in Bro\' Bear\'s famous line : \"I gwanna...nock...yo haid...clean...OFF !\" [from Disney\'s \"Song of the South,\" adaptations of Joel Chandler Harris\' stories.]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-08 18:45:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, should be \"...yo...haid...\"

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 04:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 124

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
4 mins
  -> Thanks, NancyLynn. You like "phonologism" then?

agree  xxxEDLING
10 mins
  -> Thanks, EDLING.

agree  Catherine Bolton: To add to your Woody Allen note, the thing starts with "Djeet yet"? - did you eat yet? "No, jew?" "OK, lesgweet".
13 hrs
  -> That last not in the movie, I believe. Thanks, cb.

agree  Rusinterp
1 day10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rusinterp.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Note to Christopher


Explanation:
(Sorry Jose, your question stokes old fires :-)

I see you use "don´t" (I know your "ain´t" is ironic). "Gonna" is a component of an irregular future of "to go". In another few decades it will be as accepted as “don´t”. I agree that just because Shrub says it, that don´t make it grammer, but how about if 50 million people say it a thousand times a year?

I am delighted to see that you are just as creative in your use of language as I like to be in music – the “dragons” are a lovely image, if intended to be monitory, and “phonologism” is really great!

Chris Rowson
Local time: 10:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: O.k., so "phonologism" is "great"--that still means that we'll have to get 49,999,998 more people who use it 1,000 times a year before it gets into the OED(It's already in the Random House & Am.Heri., I presume.) & please doant refer to Duhbya as "shrub."
18 hrs
  -> OK, I woant

agree  Nikita Kobrin: As a student I was very fond of AmEn and my teachers at the university simply hated all my gonna's and wanna's. They used to tell me: "We teach you English not American!".
2 days18 hrs
  -> I went an old-style English school, and learnt old-style English, along with the Latin and Greek. It was only later that I discovered the delights of American English, and of using language creatively myself.
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