KudoZ home » English » Art/Literary

...the late John Smith

English translation: recently deceased

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:the late John Smith
English translation:recently deceased
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:34 Jan 12, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: ...the late John Smith
to imply that one has passed on (dead)

"the late"
Monique L
recently deceased
Explanation:
People who have died recently are sometimes referred to as "the late".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-12 22:39:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Merriam Webster\'s: living comparatively recently. Used with persons (the late John Doe) and often with reference to a specific relationship or status (his late wife).
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 16:52
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +29recently deceased
Kim Metzger


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +29
recently deceased


Explanation:
People who have died recently are sometimes referred to as "the late".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-12 22:39:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Merriam Webster\'s: living comparatively recently. Used with persons (the late John Doe) and often with reference to a specific relationship or status (his late wife).

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 16:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Rosich Andreu
0 min

agree  Andrea Ali
1 min

agree  Drak: Yep. Deader than a doorknob.
4 mins

agree  Peter Coles
7 mins

agree  Giusi Pasi
12 mins

agree  Scott Evans: Absolutely - the late means deceased
14 mins

agree  Liv Bliss
14 mins

agree  Rowan Morrell: Now we have the late Maurice Gibb (Stayin' Alive won't seem quite the same) ...
15 mins

agree  JCEC
27 mins

agree  Refugio: who died lately, of late
29 mins

agree  Arthur Borges: Of course, Kim -- but Drak, never underestimate the power of a doorknob, buy why doornails should be any dumber occasionally slays me.
42 mins

agree  Attila Piróth
1 hr

agree  Enza Longo
1 hr

agree  Paula Ibbotson
3 hrs

agree  Nina Engberg
6 hrs

agree  xxxEDLING
8 hrs

agree  xxxCrown: (RIP) :)
8 hrs

agree  Sarah Ponting
8 hrs

agree  Tanja Abramovic
9 hrs

agree  Lesley Clayton
9 hrs

agree  Hermann
9 hrs

agree  Yelena.
10 hrs

agree  jerrie
10 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter: Fast Eddy at his best ;-))
11 hrs

agree  xxxluisantos
13 hrs

agree  estenger
14 hrs

agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, not just "dead," but recently deceased.
16 hrs

agree  writeaway: am not sure about the recently bit, but is usually said about someone one knows (knew) (of) in one's own lifetime
3 days16 hrs

agree  kaalema
11 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search