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cheesy-doodle

English translation: melted cheese sauce

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10:16 May 25, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: cheesy-doodle
We’re having a hot-dog casserole with a cheesy-doodle sauce and celernip fries.
---what does it mean by “cheesy-doodle”?
buttercup
English translation:melted cheese sauce
Explanation:
I searched Google and could only find what appears to be a piece of cheese (doesn't specify which type) fried in batter. Here's a link showing a photo:

http://www.jodiverse.com/archives/001051.html

Howver, I suspect it is some kind of melted cheese sauce --or dip --for the hotdogs.
Luck!
terry
Selected response from:

Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 05:22
Grading comment
THank you very much

3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4imaginary (specially for the book) humourous "cheese sauce"
DGK T-I
4 +2melted cheese sauce
Terry Burgess
4 +1cheese doodle were my favorite sncak as a kidJ. Leo
2 +2cheeseRowan Morrell
4macaroni cheese sauce
Sarah Ponting
3cheese spray in a canMarie Scarano


  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
cheese


Explanation:
I'm not altogether sure about this, but I think here "cheesy-doodle" may mean simply "cheese". It's just a slightly elaborate way of saying it.

However, I've never heard of this expression, and there are no informative hits about the phrase on the search engines, so I can't say it with absolute certainty. "Cheese" is my first instinct, though.

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 22:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 227

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: doodle seems to suggest melted...
0 min
  -> Ah, OK, thanks for the additional info.

agree  DGK T-I
38 mins
  -> Thanks Giuli.
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
melted cheese sauce


Explanation:
I searched Google and could only find what appears to be a piece of cheese (doesn't specify which type) fried in batter. Here's a link showing a photo:

http://www.jodiverse.com/archives/001051.html

Howver, I suspect it is some kind of melted cheese sauce --or dip --for the hotdogs.
Luck!
terry


    NN
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 05:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 119
Grading comment
THank you very much

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowan Morrell: Looks like you might have nailed it.
3 mins

agree  DGK T-I
37 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cheese doodle were my favorite sncak as a kid


Explanation:
Cheese doodles are a snack of puffed cheese. It's like biting on crunchy air. In the US I've seen recipies on the side of crackers and snacks that propose that product as an ingridient.
Cereal when mixed with marshmallows that makes a sweet 'cake'. Ritz Crackers that can be used to make a 'mock' apple pie'.
I think that the cheese doodle could be manipulated into a sauce for a hot dog. Afterall, it's only a hot dog.

J. Leo
Local time: 12:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl
3 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
imaginary (specially for the book) humourous "cheese sauce"


Explanation:
I suspect it's imaginary (made up specially for the book) as a joke.
My reason is the reference to 'Celernip fries' (on the side!). I'm not aware of a vegetable called Celernip, and suspect it's a humourous name made up from 'celeriac', 'celery' & 'turnip', as a joke - similarly the cheese doodle would be a play on words on cheese noodle, and be 'doodled' (like doodling, meaning 'drawing a picture, absent mindedly') over the food. All very jokey.
The only reference on MSN that came up for me for 'celernip' was from this book:
"boys stories: The Terror of the Pink Dodo Balloons (Horace Splattly: The Cupcaked Crusader, 3)" (!),
{ref. below}
suggesting 'celernip' isn't a real vegetable except in Horaces world.
(Be gentle with me, you experts in the linguistics of exotic vegetables !)

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Note added at 2003-05-25 12:07:07 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in contrast there are 82,000 references to \'Turnip\', 9600 to celeriac & 18 to celery - all of them referring to recipes or growing them, rather than magical stories with Horace as the hero. If Celernip was real, it is likely that people would be growing or eating it outside Horace\'s world...... :-)


    Reference: http://boys.mybookcenter.com/n_0142500011.htm
DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:22
PRO pts in pair: 401

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie: I think it can mean whatever you want it too! (Could be melted cheese, cheesy puffs, or cheese that is directed in a stream 'doodled' like ketchup)...
7 mins
  -> in fact a doodle in the imagination of the reader:-)

agree  David Moore
43 mins
  -> thank you ~

agree  Refugio: Yes, doodle is a playful word. [ETYMOLOGY: 20th Century: perhaps from C17 doodle a foolish person, but influenced in meaning by dawdle; compare Low German dudeltopf simpleton] Like Yankee Doodle.
7 hrs
  -> thanks Ruth - & interesting origin

agree  xxxwendyzee
19 hrs
  -> thank you
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cheese spray in a can


Explanation:
I'm going to take nostalgia even a step further, although I can't seem to find solid references to it. I seem to remember that there used to be (many moons ago)this brand name of cheese spray in a can (like whipped cream) that could be used for garnishing fancy dishes or canapés. It could have been something similar however. Maybe someone else will also remember this product.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-25 12:30:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Doodle\" in the sense of drawing senseless, squiggly lines for decoration.


Easy Cheese - American Style

American cheese in an Aerosol can. Squirt straight on to a cooked burger in a bun for a real American Cheese burger.

Did you ever notice what happens to an aerosol can when it’s getting empty? It sort of comes out in spurts with a lot of air. Well apply this concept to Easy Cheese (you know the cheese spread in a can that squirts out the nozzle). I purchased some recently, where it was sitting on a shelf, unrefrigerated. On the top of the can it states “No Need To Refrigerate.” Now doesn’t that sound like a pretty passive statement? If the makers of this product really didn’t want us to keep this stuff in the refrigerator wouldn’t they have written something like “Do Not Refrigerate” or “Federal Law Prohibits Refrigeration Of This Product.” Well that’s what I thought. Needless to say I stuck it in the refrigerator after I was done with it. Which was pretty entertaining I might add. Every cheese and cracker combination was a work of art. And much to my delight, aerosol based cheese is a three dimensional artistic medium as well! Not only can you write your name in cheese (two dimensional), but you can build little Triscut fortresses by using the Easy Cheese as a bonding agent to hold the walls and roof together (three dimensional). Call me crazy, but there’s just something about artificially flavored, gas propelled dairy products that brings out the Picasso in me!
http://www.nothans.com/ph_pt_stupidity.html

Marie Scarano
Italy
Local time: 12:22
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 81
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
macaroni cheese sauce


Explanation:
Yankee Doodle Macaroni is a kind of macaroni cheese (I imagine the name stems from the song:
"Yankee Doodle went to town
riding on a pony
He stuck a feather in his hat
and called it macaroni").

I've found reference to macaroni cheese with hotdogs (I thought it was a sort of joke when I read your text, but apparently not...):

Hot Dog Mac and Cheese: Stir one cup sliced frankfurters (about 3) or cut-up luncheon meat into cheese sauce.


http://www.ncte.ie/viking/recusa.htm


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Note added at 2003-05-26 06:56:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Yankee Doodle Macaroni

Ingredients

2 boxes macaroni and cheese mix
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup butter or margarine\"

http://www.sbcss.k12.ca.us/sbcss/specialeducation/ecthematic...







Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 12:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 67
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