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compare to vs. compare with (here)

English translation: Take a look at the previous posting of this question

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:compare to vs. compare with (here)
English translation:Take a look at the previous posting of this question
Entered by: Miroslawa Jodlowiec
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07:51 Nov 7, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary / grammar - discourse analysis
English term or phrase: compare to vs. compare with (here)
Provisional title of project

How does the connective discourse marker ‘yet’ compare to other similar expressions?

Is it correct or I should rather say compare with?
Miroslawa Jodlowiec
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:42
Take a look at the previous posting of this question
Explanation:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/178549
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Aaaaa.... now I understand it!Thanks a lot to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2compare withxxxIanW
5to=similarity / with=difference
Andy Watkinson
5Take a look at the previous posting of this questionFuad Yahya
5In a nutshellGordon Darroch


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
compare with


Explanation:
For me as a native speaker, "compare with" sounds far better when used intransitively (i.e. where no direct object is used).

xxxIanW
Local time: 17:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 235

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Knowles: Definitely "with", and I'd say "How does margarine compare with butter?" but there's "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?"
10 mins

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
19 mins
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Take a look at the previous posting of this question


Explanation:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/178549


    Reference: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/178549
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893
Grading comment
Aaaaa.... now I understand it!Thanks a lot to all!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
In a nutshell


Explanation:
"Compare to" is contrastive - comparing chalk to cheese
"Compare with" is used to draw comparisons between similar things - comparing the left hand with the right

This might save you trawling through the long previous entry!

Gordon Darroch
Local time: 16:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 16
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
to=similarity / with=difference


Explanation:
I have always heard the usage described in the opposite way to the previous answer.

i.e. "compare to" denotes similarity, which explains the "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" - Shakespeare is saying that the person is as beautiful as a summer's day, so he uses "to".

"compare with" would, strictly speaking, be used for all other expressions.

In practical terms "compare with" is probably used by most people most of the time.

Andy Watkinson
Spain
Local time: 17:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 33
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