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smooch

English translation: a stain

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01:23 Dec 2, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: smooch
American usage. I need preferably another meaning or usage than "to kiss or pet".
This is from a short story since 1892. Presumably, the usage has changed since then.

With advance thanks,
Jóhann R. Kristjánsson.
Johann Kristjansson
Local time: 07:12
English translation:a stain
Explanation:
Ok folks this is eerie, but this might be what we are looking for...

A Google search first revealed a disturbing (unreliable?) link to a page transcribing (supposed?) testimony from the infamous trial of the Lizzie Borden murders circa 1892 in Fall River, Massachusetts.

http://www.lizzieandrewborden.com/Diversion/Phychicfile.htm

Q. What else did she wear besides trousers?
A. Hat
Q. What color hat?
A. Dark
Q. Any gloves?
A. No gloves
Q. Anything on chest and waist?
A. Nothing but trousers and hat
Q. What about paint?
A. Turkey red - smooch on dress burnt - from mop-board in kitchen - May, 1892.

Further searching then revealed what appears to be the actual transcription of the testimony.

http://www.lizzieandrewborden.com/pdf files/inqvol2May2003.p...

I went up to the room where Mrs. Borden was found, and saw her laying there, and saw the blood on the bed, or at least on the shams, apparently a smooch it struck me, on the counterpain or coverlet.

Then there is also this one reference where a modern day commentator on the subject uses the term:

Lizzie Borden Society -- Archive -- LB -- Lead
... Then we are left with that smooch at the pocket of the ... that SKIRT was made of), to
be tested for pear detritus ... that, whether the crowd was in the Borden yard or ...
www.lizzieandrewborden.com/Archive703/ LBorden/LBLead.htm

Finally, from the same time period, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper", published 1892, uses the term thus:

Then she said that the paper stained everything it touched, that she had found yellow smooches on all my clothes and John's, and she wished we would be more careful!

http://itech.fgcu.edu/faculty/wohlpart/alra/gilman.htm

Oh. And Merriam-Webster confirms:

Main Entry: 4 smooch
Function: noun
Date: 1825
: SMUDGE, SMEAR


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-02 02:33:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, I forgot to add that from the context given for the question and the testimony regarding the discovery of Mrs. Borden\'s body, that I am getting that it means a round or oval-shaped stain.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-02 02:39:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops, reread the context! It appears here the shape is actually
given, so I\'ll just stick with stain. :)
Selected response from:

Ioanna Karamanou
United States
Local time: 03:12
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4a stain
Ioanna Karamanou
5 +2Additional informationcmwilliams
3 +2a synonym for streak; perhaps 'smoodge', or mark
chica nueva
5smooth, presenting no roughness or unevenness to the touch or sight
Ali Beikian
3 +2smooch
Agnieszka Hayward
4 +1kissntext
3 +2to smutch / to smudge or soil / to smile
Michael Powers (PhD)
4to dance very slowly and amorouslySusana Galilea
3caress
jerrie


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to dance very slowly and amorously


Explanation:
Source: The Collins English Dictionary © 2000 HarperCollins Publishers:

smooch [smuːtʃ] (informal)
verb [intransitive]
1 Also (Austral. and N.Z.): smoodge, smooge (of two people) to kiss and cuddle

2 (British) to dance very slowly and amorously with one's arms around another person, or (of two people) to dance together in such a way
noun
3 the act of smooching

4 (British) a piece of music played for dancing to slowly and amorously
[ETYMOLOGY: 20th Century: variant of dialect smouch, of imitative origin

Susana Galilea
United States
Local time: 02:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 110

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  PB Trans: The asker's context is American usage. "Smooching" is not "dancing" in North America
9 mins
  -> I did not notice the context. I'm leaving it in case it helps. Thanks.

neutral  Will Matter: agree with Nina, 'smooching' is 'kissing', not 'dancing' otherwise the expression 'gimme a smooch' (kiss me) would make no sense
12 mins
  -> I did not notice the context. I'm leaving it in case it helps. Thanks.
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to smutch / to smudge or soil / to smile


Explanation:
possibility from Random House

smutch (smuch), v.t.
1. to smudge or soil.

mooch1 (smÁch), v.t., n.
smutch.

smooch2 (smÁch), Informal.
–v.i.
1. to kiss.
2. to pet.
–n.
3. a kiss; smack.
[1580–90; var. of obs. smouch to kiss < ?; cf. dial. G schmutzen to kiss, smile]
—smoochÆer, n.

I don't know if any of these fit, but just in case, I thought I would share this with you.

Mike :)



Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 03:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1174

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: go with 'kiss' my friend.
12 mins

agree  Pippin Michelli: In this rather limited context, I like this smudge or soil best. I don't get the sense of kissing from this text, at all. More like "a long straight, even smear ..." Is there any further useful context?
3 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
kiss


Explanation:
The word dates back to at least 1588.


    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?va=smooch
ntext
United States
Local time: 02:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 379

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: that's it.
12 mins
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
smooch


Explanation:
is to kiss and hug, at least that's how I know it... mhm...

Agnieszka Hayward
Poland
Local time: 09:12
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  PB Trans: kiss and cuddle
6 mins
  -> yyyyeah. thank you

agree  RHELLER: not just one kiss, more like oodles (lots)
1 hr
  -> thank you
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
a stain


Explanation:
Ok folks this is eerie, but this might be what we are looking for...

A Google search first revealed a disturbing (unreliable?) link to a page transcribing (supposed?) testimony from the infamous trial of the Lizzie Borden murders circa 1892 in Fall River, Massachusetts.

http://www.lizzieandrewborden.com/Diversion/Phychicfile.htm

Q. What else did she wear besides trousers?
A. Hat
Q. What color hat?
A. Dark
Q. Any gloves?
A. No gloves
Q. Anything on chest and waist?
A. Nothing but trousers and hat
Q. What about paint?
A. Turkey red - smooch on dress burnt - from mop-board in kitchen - May, 1892.

Further searching then revealed what appears to be the actual transcription of the testimony.

http://www.lizzieandrewborden.com/pdf files/inqvol2May2003.p...

I went up to the room where Mrs. Borden was found, and saw her laying there, and saw the blood on the bed, or at least on the shams, apparently a smooch it struck me, on the counterpain or coverlet.

Then there is also this one reference where a modern day commentator on the subject uses the term:

Lizzie Borden Society -- Archive -- LB -- Lead
... Then we are left with that smooch at the pocket of the ... that SKIRT was made of), to
be tested for pear detritus ... that, whether the crowd was in the Borden yard or ...
www.lizzieandrewborden.com/Archive703/ LBorden/LBLead.htm

Finally, from the same time period, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper", published 1892, uses the term thus:

Then she said that the paper stained everything it touched, that she had found yellow smooches on all my clothes and John's, and she wished we would be more careful!

http://itech.fgcu.edu/faculty/wohlpart/alra/gilman.htm

Oh. And Merriam-Webster confirms:

Main Entry: 4 smooch
Function: noun
Date: 1825
: SMUDGE, SMEAR


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-02 02:33:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, I forgot to add that from the context given for the question and the testimony regarding the discovery of Mrs. Borden\'s body, that I am getting that it means a round or oval-shaped stain.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-02 02:39:23 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops, reread the context! It appears here the shape is actually
given, so I\'ll just stick with stain. :)

Ioanna Karamanou
United States
Local time: 03:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 152

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson: This seems to be the "smooch" in the context. There is still too little context to know - what is this streak? - but I wonder if "smear" might be good here.
3 hrs

agree  xxxtazdog: Webster's Dictionary from 1913 says "see smutch" in its definition for "smooch"; and "smutch" says "a stain or dirty spot." http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=smooch
3 hrs

agree  mbc: i´m getting the feeling smooch means "smudge" here
6 hrs
  -> thanks guys!

agree  Nado2002: positively it is a stain , this is the reasonable meaning to it in the text here , as it is followed by " as if it had been rubbed over and over." why should we go for another meaning like Kiss here , who would kiss the bed , and then rub it over& over;)
15 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
smooth, presenting no roughness or unevenness to the touch or sight


Explanation:
Based on the context you have provided, the word "smooch" functions as an adjective, not as a noun or a verb. Furthermore, it is followed by "as if it had been rubbed over and over". Now what "frequent rubbing or being rubbed" results in is but SMOOTHNESS. The perplexity, I believe, arises from the ellipsis occured to the noun "bed", which the aforesaid adjectives precede. Therefore, the word must have been (or intended to be) SMOOTH, which may have been inflicted with misspelling.

Ali Beikian
Iran
Local time: 11:42
Native speaker of: Native in Persian (Farsi)Persian (Farsi), Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: Looks like a noun to me: "a long, straight, even smooch".
2 hrs

agree  Dorota Cooper
10 hrs

disagree  Ioanna Karamanou: looks like a noun to me
10 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
a synonym for streak; perhaps 'smoodge', or mark


Explanation:
A synonym for streak, from the context.

But also,try smoodge.

(In our family, this is what the cat does when it rubs against you, looking for attention, or responding to it...)

Perhaps 'mark' would do.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 28 mins (2003-12-02 09:52:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I notice now \'smoodge\' is Australian colloquial, so probably not useful for this text.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 10 mins (2003-12-02 10:33:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Smooch! The author might have liked the sound of it, as the eye travels around the room. To me, it is quite rich in associations...

(swish, swoosh, smoodge, smooze, smudge+mooch...)

Short story -> so the language possibly quite \'crafted\', dense, poetic, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 12 mins (2003-12-02 10:36:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Smooch! The author might have liked the sound of it, as the eye travels around the room. To me, it is quite rich in associations...

(swish, swoosh, smoodge, smooze, smudge+mooch...)

Short story -> so the language possibly quite \'crafted\', dense, poetic, etc.

chica nueva
Local time: 19:12
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 83

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gilbert Ashley: Exactly, the context tells it all. Es una mancha. I'd also mention that to smooch also emans to steal.
1 hr

agree  cmwilliams
4 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
caress


Explanation:
as a noun, as in the way the streak is caressing the room, insinuating its way behind all the pieces of furniture, like one long, even, straight caress...rubbing gently, over and over...

Well it is a short story, who knows!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-02 11:44:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://thesaurus.reference.com/search?q=smooch

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Additional information


Explanation:
Not for points.

Presumably this is from "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and I found this which you may find useful:

...I thought seriously of burning the house- to reach the smell. But now I am used to it. The only thing I can think of is that it is like the color of the paper! A yellow smell. There is a very funny mark on this wall, low down, near the mopboard. A streak that runs round the room. It goes behind every piece of furniture, except the bed, a long, straight, even smooch, as if it had been rubbed over and over.

At the end of the story, the narrator's own shoulder "just fits in that long smooch around the wall" (p. 35). The mark of repetition, the uncanny trace made by the present stuck in the groove of the past, the "smooch" is also a smudge or smear, a reciprocal dirtying, perhaps (the wallpaper leaves "yellow smooches on all my clothes and John's" p. 2). In the 1890s, "smooch" had not taken on its slangy mid-twentieth century meaning (as in "I'd rather have hooch/ And a bit of a smooch"[ 1945]). The "smooch" on the yellow wallpaper cannot yet be a sexual caress, although dirty rubbing might be both Doctor John's medical verdict on sexuality and the story's hysterical literalization of it. As such, the dirty stain of smooching would constitute not just the unmentionable aspect of the narrator's genteel marital incapacity, but the unsay- able in Gilman's story--the sexual etiology of hysteria, certainly (repressed in Gilman's as in Breuer's text); but also the repression imposed by the 1890s on the representation of female sexuality and, in particular, the repression imposed on women's writing.




    Reference: http://www.dac.neu.edu/womens.studies/jacobus.htm
cmwilliams
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 69

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ioanna Karamanou: Fascinating analysis... smooch appears more and more to be something dirty, negative, and not just simply a mark.
1 hr

agree  Nado2002
4 hrs
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