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curbs in

English translation: implements restrictions on stock market trading in the case of unusual volatility

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:curbs in [vi, bus./fin]
English translation:implements restrictions on stock market trading in the case of unusual volatility
Entered by: Libero_Lang_Lab
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09:34 Aug 7, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial / stockmarket
English term or phrase: curbs in
They use it when DJIA moves with more than 200 points in a session.
Albena
curbs in = restrictions triggered
Explanation:
Curbs in is the term used when restrictions (or curbs) on activties causing volatile net swings in the stock market index, such as the one you describe, are activated.

The description below comes from www.invest-faq.com

A variety of mechanisms are in place on the U.S. exchanges to restrict program trading (i.e., to cut off the big boy's computer connections) whenever the market moves up or down by more than a large number of points in a trading day. Most are triggered by moves down, although some are triggered by moves up as well.

The idea is that these curbs on trading, also known as collars, will limit the daily damage by restricting activities that might lead towards greater volatility and large price moves, and encouraging trading activities that tend to stabilize prices. Although these trading restrictions are commonly known as circuit breakers, that term actually refers to just one specific restriction.

These changes were enacted in 1989 because program trading was blamed for the fast crash of 1987. Note that the NYSE defines a Program Trade as a basket of 15 or more stocks from the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, or a basket of stocks from the Standard & Poor's 500 Index valued at $1 million or more.

Trading restrictions affect trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) where S&P 500 futures contracts are traded. When these restrictions are triggered, you may hear the phrase "curbs in" if you listen to CNBC.

Here's a table that summarizes the trading restrictions in place on the NYSE and CME as of this writing. The range is always checked in reference to the previous close. E.g., a move of up 200 and down 180 points would still be an up of 20 with respect to the previous close, so the first restriction listed below would not be triggered. Any curb still in effect at the close of trading is removed after the close; i.e., every trading day starts without curbs.

Note that the "sidecar" rules were eliminated on Tuesday, February 16, 1999.


Restriction Triggered by
NYSE collar (Rule 80A) DJIA moves 2%
CME restriction 1 S&P500 futures contract moves 2.5%
CME restriction 2 S&P500 futures contract moves 5%
CME restriction 3 S&P500 futures contract moves 10%

NYSE circuit breaker nr. 1 DJIA moves 10%
NYSE circuit breaker nr. 2 DJIA moves 20%
NYSE Circuit breaker nr. 3 DJIA moves 30%
Selected response from:

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:42
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3reins inxxxR.J.Chadwick
4 +3curbs in = restrictions triggered
Libero_Lang_Lab
4Deactivation of automatic sell or buy orders
Tom Funke


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Deactivation of automatic sell or buy orders


Explanation:
(In my own layman's words:)The New York Stock Exchange computer system is set up so automatic sell or buy orders that specific customers may have arranged will be deactivated in the event of extreme market fluctuations to prevent them from aggravating such fluctuations.

HTH Tom

Tom Funke
Local time: 15:42
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
reins in


Explanation:
curb
n.
(...)
Something that checks or restrains: High interest rates put a curb on spending.
A chain or strap that passes under a horse's lower jaw and serves in conjunction with the bit to restrain the horse.

tr.v. curbed, curb·ing, curbs
To check, restrain, or control as if with a curb; rein in. See Synonyms at restrain.
To lead (a dog) off the sidewalk into the gutter so that it can excrete waste.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Blend of Middle English, curved piece of wood (from Old French corbe, curved object, from corbe, curved, from Latin curvus), Middle English corbe, horse strap (from corben, to bow down, halt, from Old French corber, to bow down, from Latin curvre, from curvus, curved, bent. See sker-2 in Indo-European Roots).]

Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

ALSO:-

curb

\Curb\, n. 1. That which curbs, restrains, or subdues; a check or hindrance; esp., a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the horse.

He that before ran in the pastures wild Felt the stiff curb control his angry jaws. --Drayton.

By these men, religion,that should be The curb, is made the spur of tyranny. --Denham.

curb

n 1: an edge between a sidewalk and a roadway consisting of a line of curbstones (usually forming part of a gutter) [syn: kerb] 2: a horse's bit with an attached chain or strap to check the horse [syn: curb bit] 3: a stock exchange in New York [syn: American Stock Exchange, AMEX, Curb] 4: the act of restraining power or action or limiting excess; "his common sense is a bridle to his quick temper" [syn: bridle, check] v 1: lessen the intensity of; temper; hold in restraint; hold or keep within limits; "moderate your alcohol intake" "hold your tongue"; "hold your temper"; "control your anger" [syn: control, hold in, hold, contain, check, moderate] 2: to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising", "stamp down on littering" "conquer one's desires" [syn: suppress, stamp down, inhibit, subdue, conquer] 3: keep to the curb; "curb your dogs" 4: place restrictions on; "curtail drinking in school" [syn: restrict, curtail, cut back]
Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 03:42
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie: reins in / restricts
17 mins
  -> the other suggestions are too context-dependent

agree  Ingrid Petit
1 hr
  -> Thank you for your support

agree  xxxKanta Rawat
21 hrs
  -> Thank you for your support, but it appears that "curbs in" can be used in an intranstive sense as Dan Brennan (below) has pointed out.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
curbs in = restrictions triggered


Explanation:
Curbs in is the term used when restrictions (or curbs) on activties causing volatile net swings in the stock market index, such as the one you describe, are activated.

The description below comes from www.invest-faq.com

A variety of mechanisms are in place on the U.S. exchanges to restrict program trading (i.e., to cut off the big boy's computer connections) whenever the market moves up or down by more than a large number of points in a trading day. Most are triggered by moves down, although some are triggered by moves up as well.

The idea is that these curbs on trading, also known as collars, will limit the daily damage by restricting activities that might lead towards greater volatility and large price moves, and encouraging trading activities that tend to stabilize prices. Although these trading restrictions are commonly known as circuit breakers, that term actually refers to just one specific restriction.

These changes were enacted in 1989 because program trading was blamed for the fast crash of 1987. Note that the NYSE defines a Program Trade as a basket of 15 or more stocks from the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, or a basket of stocks from the Standard & Poor's 500 Index valued at $1 million or more.

Trading restrictions affect trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) where S&P 500 futures contracts are traded. When these restrictions are triggered, you may hear the phrase "curbs in" if you listen to CNBC.

Here's a table that summarizes the trading restrictions in place on the NYSE and CME as of this writing. The range is always checked in reference to the previous close. E.g., a move of up 200 and down 180 points would still be an up of 20 with respect to the previous close, so the first restriction listed below would not be triggered. Any curb still in effect at the close of trading is removed after the close; i.e., every trading day starts without curbs.

Note that the "sidecar" rules were eliminated on Tuesday, February 16, 1999.


Restriction Triggered by
NYSE collar (Rule 80A) DJIA moves 2%
CME restriction 1 S&P500 futures contract moves 2.5%
CME restriction 2 S&P500 futures contract moves 5%
CME restriction 3 S&P500 futures contract moves 10%

NYSE circuit breaker nr. 1 DJIA moves 10%
NYSE circuit breaker nr. 2 DJIA moves 20%
NYSE Circuit breaker nr. 3 DJIA moves 30%


Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:42
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 137

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie: reins in / restricts
16 mins

agree  Eva Blanar
29 mins

agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: You are right -- this is a neologism that I am only now aware of, i.e. an intranstive sense of the verb "to curb in". Congratulations.
34 mins
  -> thanks - yes i am certain it is a vi - some awful wall street coinage
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