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The price will have a floor and a ceiling.

English translation: Lower limit and upper limit

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15:27 Dec 28, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
English term or phrase: The price will have a floor and a ceiling.
Could you explain the sense of the above sentence?

Could you also clarify that what is the purpose and utility of resorting to usage of figurative and symbolic expressions in official matters?
R. Chopra
English translation:Lower limit and upper limit
Explanation:
Or minimum or maximum. Sometimes we'll refer to the together as collar indicating a range with and upper and lower limit.

Why resort to figurative language ... a very difficult question. I guess it makes our jobs more interesting. In this particular case, the usage is so common within financial markets that it's more like jargon than figurative speech.

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Note added at 2002-12-28 15:41:17 (GMT)
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Ouch. Poor control of the keyboard. Make that that first paragraph:

Or minimum and maximum. Sometimes we\'ll refer to them together as a collar, indicating a range of possible values with an upper and a lower limit.
Selected response from:

Peter Coles
Local time: 07:13
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +18minimum / maximum
Cilian O'Tuama
5 +5Lower limit and upper limitPeter Coles
5 +4lower limit and upper limitRefugio
4 +4a minimum and a maximum
swisstell
5 +2The price will have a minimum and a maximum
David Knowles
5bottom and top limit
Magda Dziadosz


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +18
minimum / maximum


Explanation:
another way of saying minimum (floor) and maximum (ceiling)

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Note added at 2002-12-28 15:37:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Price Ceiling. A legally established maximum price at which a good can be sold.

Price Floor. A legally established minimum price at which a good can be sold.

http://www.google.de/search?q=cache:9_mUMrlWytQC:econserv2.b...

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 08:13
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 447

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yelena.
0 min

agree  lim0nka
1 min

agree  Sheila Hardie
9 mins

agree  mónica alfonso
35 mins

agree  xxxEDLING
37 mins

agree  swisstell: beat me to it (of course did not see it then)
42 mins
  -> no problem :-)

agree  zebung
1 hr

agree  jerrie
1 hr

agree  ana_brum
3 hrs

agree  Fuad Yahya
3 hrs

agree  JCEC
3 hrs

agree  GingerR
4 hrs

agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs

agree  luskie: with cilian and with others below - figurative? yes, but if you think aabout it the floor and the ceiling are much less abstract than a max/min concept... you might touch them... :)
7 hrs
  -> might? :-)

agree  Terry Burgess: tá.
8 hrs
  -> tá indeed :-) Let's revolutionize Irish

agree  Anette Herbert
18 hrs

agree  Dolly Xu
1 day22 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
9 days
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
a minimum and a maximum


Explanation:
is what this means, in typical marketing lingo a symbolic "floor and ceiling"

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 08:13
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 170

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxEDLING
37 mins
  -> thanks anyway but I was too late

agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs

agree  Terry Burgess
8 hrs

agree  Andrea Ali
11 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Lower limit and upper limit


Explanation:
Or minimum or maximum. Sometimes we'll refer to the together as collar indicating a range with and upper and lower limit.

Why resort to figurative language ... a very difficult question. I guess it makes our jobs more interesting. In this particular case, the usage is so common within financial markets that it's more like jargon than figurative speech.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-12-28 15:41:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ouch. Poor control of the keyboard. Make that that first paragraph:

Or minimum and maximum. Sometimes we\'ll refer to them together as a collar, indicating a range of possible values with an upper and a lower limit.

Peter Coles
Local time: 07:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 47
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl
3 hrs

agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs

agree  Andrea Ali
11 hrs

agree  Antonio Camangi
17 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
9 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
bottom and top limit


Explanation:
ceiling at least is widely used in official language. So is cap. The purpose and utility is perhaps to make it clearer and more beautiful :)
Magda

Magda Dziadosz
Poland
Local time: 08:13
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The price will have a minimum and a maximum


Explanation:
Some figurative expressions acquire the status of jargon and official language.

This is particularly true of management theory: "thinking outside the box", "Fish! psychology" and the like.

It's also true of finance: "dead-cat bounce" comes to mind!

It makes people sound more (self-) important. Gilbert (of Gilbert and Sullivan) said: "if this young man expresses himself in terms too deep for me, why what a very singularly deep young man this deep young man must be!"


    Reference: http://www.bookrags.com/books/svyrd/PART42.htm
David Knowles
Local time: 07:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 612

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs

agree  Andrea Ali
11 hrs
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
lower limit and upper limit


Explanation:
Have you ever seen film of a typical day in the "pit" of the New York Stock Exchange? These are not grey bureaucrats engaged in "official" matters. They are in some sense thrill seekers in the grip of an adrenaline rush. These urban cowboys like their language as colorful as possible. But apart from that, American English at every level is very fond of figurative jargon.

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Note added at 2002-12-28 19:08:35 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, Chopra, the wording of your question implies something of your own point of view on this subject. Utility? I think David is on the right track when he suggests that using jargon conveys some sense of power and a feeling of being an initiate, as in sports jargon or Beltway jargon. Resort to? As you can see from all the replies posted, there are plenty of ways to say this in \"ordinary\" English. I believe that keeping the imagery concrete, as in floor and ceiling, helps alleviate the abstract dullness of financial dealings.

Refugio
Local time: 23:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fuad Yahya
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Fuad

agree  Rusinterp
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, what do you like to be called?

agree  Peter Coles: ... though I can't allow you Americans to take all the credit for figurative jargon. These particular terms are much used on this side of the pond too.
6 hrs
  -> Well, yes, we came by our tendencies honestly.

agree  Andrea Ali
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Andrea
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