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mark-up

English translation: See explanation below...

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13:42 Oct 21, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
English term or phrase: mark-up
Besides, since IT is an export trade, the pressure on rupee may be bad for other sectors, but even a two three per cent mark up in dollar will mean a benefit in revenue for us.

I could not find the meaning of this phrase in my dictionary.
xxxSanjiv Sadan
Local time: 01:15
English translation:See explanation below...
Explanation:
When person A sells something to person B, they usually add on a certain percentage, to cover their costs + their profit. This is what we mean by 'mark-up', and it is often expressed in terms of a percentage.

So in your context, even a small mark-up of 2 to 3 % will allow some profit to be made

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Note added at 14 mins (2006-10-21 13:56:52 GMT)
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So if I buy something for $1 and sell it to you for $1.50, I have added a 50% mark-up (though of course, that is not necessarily all pure profit!)

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Note added at 59 mins (2006-10-21 14:41:15 GMT)
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As KC has pointed out, the amount of context given is not sufficient to be sure exactly what the intended meaning here would be, particularly in Indian English.

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-21 14:45:33 GMT)
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It could indeed be that the fact that the US$ is strong against the rupee means that EXPORTS (e.g. IT services) from India bring in more rupees, which would therefore imply that the use of 'mark-up' here is slightly unusual, and would refer to a hike in the US$ / rupee exchange rate. But what worries me in that case is that talking of a 2–3% hike in exchange rates seems rather HUGE!

Unless they simply mean that they are increasing the mark-up on the dollar price?

You see why giving sufficient context is so important!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:45
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5See explanation below...
Tony M
4 +2appreciation
Erich Ekoputra
4 +1strengthening [of the dollar]
Ian Davies
5increaseAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
increase


Explanation:
*

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Note added at 6 mins (2006-10-21 13:48:53 GMT)
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www.thefreedictionary.com mark-up

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 21:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
See explanation below...


Explanation:
When person A sells something to person B, they usually add on a certain percentage, to cover their costs + their profit. This is what we mean by 'mark-up', and it is often expressed in terms of a percentage.

So in your context, even a small mark-up of 2 to 3 % will allow some profit to be made

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2006-10-21 13:56:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So if I buy something for $1 and sell it to you for $1.50, I have added a 50% mark-up (though of course, that is not necessarily all pure profit!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 59 mins (2006-10-21 14:41:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As KC has pointed out, the amount of context given is not sufficient to be sure exactly what the intended meaning here would be, particularly in Indian English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-21 14:45:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It could indeed be that the fact that the US$ is strong against the rupee means that EXPORTS (e.g. IT services) from India bring in more rupees, which would therefore imply that the use of 'mark-up' here is slightly unusual, and would refer to a hike in the US$ / rupee exchange rate. But what worries me in that case is that talking of a 2–3% hike in exchange rates seems rather HUGE!

Unless they simply mean that they are increasing the mark-up on the dollar price?

You see why giving sufficient context is so important!

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 82
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxTatiana Nero: exactly
3 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Tatiana!

agree  David Moore
4 mins
  -> Thanks, David!

agree  silviantonia: Exactly.
15 mins
  -> Thanks, Silviantonia!

neutral  Ken Cox: No question about the 'usual' meaning of 'mark-up', but I'm a bit troubled about the way it's used in the asker's text, and in particular I'd like to see the preceding context. This is Indian English, which apparently differs from UK and US English.
27 mins
  -> Thanks, Ken! Yes, I can see what you mean; I hadn't read it that way myself, but it is certainly open to differing interpretations, without the surrounding context.

agree  Dave Calderhead: and with Ken
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Dave!

agree  Sonia Gomes: Wow great explanation !!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Sonia!
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
strengthening [of the dollar]


Explanation:
I think Erich is right in his explanation. If IT products are invoiced in USD, and the US dollar strengthens, that will mean a greater return in Rupees.

"Strengthening" is maybe a more common way of saying it than "appreciation."

Ian Davies
Australia
Local time: 05:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Makes snese from the context, and definitely the better word to express it.
10 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
appreciation


Explanation:
Oxford dictionary:
appreciation [mass noun] = increase in monetary value.

I totally agree w/ Anna Maria, yet she needs to be more rigorous in giving explanation to support her answer besides provide the proper term.

Indian's IT sector is almost fully export-oriented. So, the high value of (US) dollar against Indian rupee will mean bigger profit for the industry.

The text says: "pressure on rupee" which means rupee value is diminishing. It will be bad for sectors that are not export-oriented, such as telecom services, but not for IT. An increase in dollar value, i.e. dollar appreciation OR rupee depreciation, will mean an extra benefit (usually called foreign exchange gain / forex gain) for IT companies.

Here, in the text, that appreciation is wrongfully called "mark up" which MAY induce a negative meaning of asking price higher than industry standard. Say, per industry standard, IT should make 10-20% profit for item costs 100. Instead of asking a maximum of 120, you charge your customer 130. There, people say you have marked up the value of your product.


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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-21 15:28:11 GMT)
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Third paragraph: India's IT....

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Note added at 1 day1 hr (2006-10-22 15:25:44 GMT)
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Ref:
http://www.deccanherald.com/deccanherald/oct202005/business1...
... Institutional Investors (FIIs) amid a sustained fall in the rupee. ... due to the sharp dollar appreciation against global currencies and expectations ...

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Note added at 1 day1 hr (2006-10-22 15:27:11 GMT)
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http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2003/06/14/stories/20030...
So, the international price competitiveness of Indian goods in global markets overall was not affected by the rupee's depreciation against the dollar. ...


Erich Ekoputra
Indonesia
Local time: 02:45
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian
PRO pts in category: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  marybro: in this case, "appreciation" certainly seems to fit best in the given context
12 mins
  -> Thanks marybro for sharing the same opinion.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Marju...
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Oct 21, 2006 - Changes made by Konstantin Kisin:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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