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in front of the curve

English translation: the beginning of the curve

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19:43 Mar 8, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Business/Commerce (general)
English term or phrase: in front of the curve
Can anyone help me understand this term? I have just encountered it for the first time.

Talking about oil prices: '.....so therefore if you drive the price too far below $80 the front of the curve, i.e. the current price, just looks too low.'

Obviously this tells me that the front of the curve refers to the current price, but more generally how is this reference to 'the curve' used? Another expression used in the text is "further down the curve".

Any ideas very welcome!
Emily Justice
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:00
English translation:the beginning of the curve
Explanation:
If you start the graph with a low price the curve will also be low, then it may go up or down, it goes up if prices rise and down if prices fall, further down the curve is used to describe the last part of a falling curve. For example, you are now at $85, further down(if it goes down) it falls (prices fall) to $ 70.

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Note added at 54 mins (2008-03-08 20:38:06 GMT)
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and back of the curve is generally the end.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-03-08 23:25:32 GMT)
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Yes, what Gary says is that in Emily's text there's a comma missing after $80, and that would make it clearer.
Selected response from:

Beatriz Galiano
Argentina
Local time: 03:00
Grading comment
Thanks to all answerers. I'm still not 100% sure, but I found this answer particularly helpful.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1the beginning of the curveBeatriz Galiano
3 +1for infoKen Cox
3the flat or rounded part of the curve
Nelida Kreer
3the trend
Mark Nathan


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the trend


Explanation:
More generally, this is I have seen this expression used. The direction of a curve on a graph (i.e. the most recent values) indicates a trend.

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 08:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the flat or rounded part of the curve


Explanation:
Your sentence says it: if you drive the price too far below the round part of the curve, representing the current price, this front or rounded part of the curve will look too low. Picture the curve in your mind as if it were a child's drawing of a mountain [not ending in a peak, but rounded]. If your price goes too far below the rounded part [forget about the sides] then the curve will look sort of flat with respect to the level ground.
This is how I interpret it, don't know if I made any sense or succeeded in explaining myself.

Nelida Kreer
Uruguay
Local time: 03:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the front of the curve
for info


Explanation:
This expression refers to the 'yield curve', which is a term and concept used in the investment world. I don't know that area well enough to provide a concise & accurage explanation, but you might learn more from the references listed below.

Incidientally, there is a significant difference between 'the front of the curve' and 'in front of the curve'.

Yield curve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In finance, the yield curve is the relation between the interest rate (or cost of borrowing) and the time to maturity of the debt for a given borrower in a ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yield_curve

SEC Info - Ing Investment Funds Inc, et al. - N-30D - For 5/31/01
The current price should be in the lower half of the stock's ...... due in large part to our style of taking credit risk in the front of the curve. ...
www.secinfo.com/dsVSc.4F9y2.htm

Financial Engineering Principles: A Unified Theory for Financial ...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat
from the front of the yield curve to the back and provide ideas for how a ...... that its value is above its current price, or we can buy the asset if we ...
https://emwesphone.sslpowered.com/emwes.com/data/ebook/Finan...

BC Research Note
combination of LDI flows and repricing of the front of the curve drive an ...... South Africa’s yield curve is very inverted and on a historical comparison ...
www.rybinski.eu/resources/non-modules.d/dispatcher/dispatch...

Ken Cox
Local time: 08:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Phong Le
4 hrs
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the beginning of the curve


Explanation:
If you start the graph with a low price the curve will also be low, then it may go up or down, it goes up if prices rise and down if prices fall, further down the curve is used to describe the last part of a falling curve. For example, you are now at $85, further down(if it goes down) it falls (prices fall) to $ 70.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 mins (2008-03-08 20:38:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and back of the curve is generally the end.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-03-08 23:25:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, what Gary says is that in Emily's text there's a comma missing after $80, and that would make it clearer.

Beatriz Galiano
Argentina
Local time: 03:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thanks to all answerers. I'm still not 100% sure, but I found this answer particularly helpful.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gary D: too far below $80, the front of the curve. Just put a comma after $80, and it is right. You have to use a comma and not a full stop as it is a continuing thought. The front of the curve, Ie; the current price. the rest is as Beatriz says.
22 mins
  -> Thanks Gary.
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