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American/United States/U.S. nationality

English translation: U.S. citizen

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10:28 Aug 5, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Certificates, Diplomas, Licenses, CVs
English term or phrase: American/United States/U.S. nationality
This is on a certificate that will be accompanying an official award. It indicates the recipient as: "Mr XXX, of *** nationality". Should I say "American nationality", "U.S. nationality" or "United States nationality"?
FionaT
Netherlands
Local time: 08:26
English translation:U.S. citizen
Explanation:
U.S. citizen

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Note added at 8 mins (2004-08-05 10:36:40 GMT)
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you can also use U.S. nationality.
Selected response from:

Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
Bangladesh
Local time: 12:26
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your views! It's definitely a tricky one (and I agree with Alvaro's remark that it would be easier if he changed nationality :-)), but in the end I am going to go with Saleh's answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +16U.S. citizen
Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
4 +4Mr. X, who is a national of the United States,....
AnnikaLight
4 +2US national
Vladimir Dubisskiy
5 +1Mr. XXX, a citizen of the United States
humbird
5Mr xxx, citizen of the United States of America,...
Paul Dixon
4 +1definitely not American
Armorel Young
5an American
Marian Greenfield
4Mr. XXX, of the United States of AmericaRefugio
4Mr XXX, of *US-American* nationality
Christian
5 -3Do what the Latinos dozaphod


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
american/united states/u.s. nationality
definitely not American


Explanation:
because America covers the whole of North and South America, even though it is colloquially used to mean the USA. In my view it is best to write it out in full and say United States nationality.

Armorel Young
Local time: 07:26
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Marian Greenfield: Except that American is what is used in spoken English by native English speakers, "United States nationality" is not,
1 hr
  -> I would agree with you in a colloquial context, but in a formal context it is important to be accurate

neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: for American Webster says "a citizen of the United States"; the OED says "a citizen of the Unites States of America"
2 hrs

agree  Refugio: Totally agree. American is informal, and should never be used on a certificate.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ruth - that's just how I see it. After all, you might describe yourself as having an American passport, but it doesn't say "American passport" on the cover.

agree  Patrick Weill
4214 days
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
american/united states/u.s. nationality
an American


Explanation:
we would not say of American nationality...

on a form you could write
nationality: American, but in speaking you would drop the word nationality, as it's implicit.

in immigrationese you might say "a U.S. national", but not in an award setting...

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 02:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Karpouzi
24 mins

agree  xxxsarahl: you're right, Marian, absurd as it may seem, it's just the way it is.ADD: this non-native is convinced! :)
1 hr
  -> thanks... suspect though that it is hard to convince the non-natives of the cold, hard truth....

disagree  cjperera: too general
2 hrs

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: used by 99% of all English speakers the world over, still "an American citizen" is better
2 hrs

disagree  Refugio: In "America", we may call ourselves "Americans." But if this is for the Netherlands, it would be better to use the actual name of the United States of America. See my agree to Saleh.
3 hrs
  -> perhaps... depending on how it's worded... I would agree that "a citizen of the United States of America" would work, but NONE of the other answers suggested...

neutral  sylvie malich: I'm with Ruth, if this award is presented in the US, then American would suffice.
5 hrs

disagree  humbird: Not in an official paper. Besides what is the definitions of "American"? The Americas includes all countries in the Western Hemisphere.
11 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
american/united states/u.s. nationality
U.S. citizen


Explanation:
U.S. citizen

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-08-05 10:36:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

you can also use U.S. nationality.

Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
Bangladesh
Local time: 12:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your views! It's definitely a tricky one (and I agree with Alvaro's remark that it would be easier if he changed nationality :-)), but in the end I am going to go with Saleh's answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mcguegan
3 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  AnnikaLight
8 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Christian: Would it be correct to write "of US-American nationality"?
9 mins
  -> "of US-American nationality" - may be acceptable but I think it would not be a good choise! Thank you.

agree  Eva Karpouzi
24 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  chopra_2002
40 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  moken: I would go with this. If it didn't have to sound "official", I'd just say "Mr. XYZ, from the United States" :O)
42 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  IrinaGM
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  cjperera
2 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Ramesh Madhavan
2 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Asghar Bhatti
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  airmailrpl: -
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Refugio: I would write out 'a citizen of the United States of America' in full. There are other countries whose name includes "United States", including our neighbor, 'los Estados Unidos Mexicanos."
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Nedzad Selmanovic: agree with Ruth as well
12 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  eccotraduttrice
1 day21 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
8 days
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
american/united states/u.s. nationality
Mr. X, who is a national of the United States,....


Explanation:
Just another version...but I also like Saleh's suggestion: U.S. citizen

AnnikaLight
Germany
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.: Good choice.
53 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Alejandra Hozikian
1 hr
  -> thanks

agree  Alexander Demyanov: US National
1 hr
  -> thanks

agree  conejo: I think this sounds more official
2 hrs
  -> thanks

neutral  Refugio: To describe someone as a "national" sounds more journalistic than official. ADD: You are right about the BCIS, but it still doesn't sound like certificate language.
4 hrs
  -> Ruth, I don't think it's journalistic. "national of the United States" is a term often used by the INS (or now BCIS)
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57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
american/united states/u.s. nationality
Mr XXX, of *US-American* nationality


Explanation:
If you don't want to change the sentence "Mr XXX of *** nationality", this might be another option.

Christian
Local time: 08:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -3
Do what the Latinos do


Explanation:
Use "North American National"

zaphod
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  lindaellen: Canada is in North America, too!!
4 mins
  -> So? They can't just say they're Canadians?

disagree  conejo: I must agree with Linda: Canada is part of North America, and this wouldn't ever be used on an official certificate, althouth Latinos do say "norteamericanos" in Spanish.
1 hr
  -> Why not? I've seen it on Official Certificates in Central and South America enough.

disagree  Refugio: Actually, this is a variation of the argument not to use American. American refers to two continents, and North American refers to three countries.
3 hrs
  -> Which three? Mexico is central America.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
american/united states/u.s. nationality
Mr. XXX, a citizen of the United States


Explanation:
That's the way I understand.

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sylvie malich: Yes. (Hey! I've found my twin!!! BTW, it's "RenAissance")
1 hr
  -> Thanks, I corrected. I use two pictures, one is me with Kimono, the other eye-rolling Mona Lisa. Yes we are twins.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
american/united states/u.s. nationality
Mr xxx, citizen of the United States of America,...


Explanation:
This is how I would word it. The term "American" is definitely not used. An option would be: Mr xxx, of United States citizenship.

Paul Dixon
Brazil
Local time: 03:26
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
american/united states/u.s. nationality
Mr. XXX, of the United States of America


Explanation:
Sometimes simplest is best.

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Note added at 4 hrs 59 mins (2004-08-05 15:28:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In reality, I don\'t think it is the man\'s nationality in the sense of citizenship that is essential here, but rather simply a reference to where he is from.

Refugio
Local time: 23:26
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
american/united states/u.s. nationality
US national


Explanation:
I think you may put it like this.. - I have seen it in use.

Vladimir Dubisskiy
United States
Local time: 01:26
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  zaphod
3 hrs

agree  humbird: Yes, INS (have different name now) uses that too.
4 hrs
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