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fliting (?)

English translation: fleeting

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19:57 Oct 23, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: fliting (?)
Two Princeton students are playing chess. The time for one of the player's move is out. They both start laughing and the one who won points at the clock with 0:0:0 flashing and says:
"Now, this is Ian fliting. This is Ian losing on time."

I'm not sure if "fliting" is exactly the word he says, it may be something similar. Unfortunately, I don't have the script, just the movie. I've been listening to the bit over and over again and I can't come up with anything else that would make any sense in this context.

My question is: does this sound ok to you? Is this something one could say in such a situation? Maybe some other, similar sounding word comes to your mind?
Joanna Borowska
Poland
Local time: 23:04
English translation:fleeting
Explanation:
time is often referred to as fleeting...
Selected response from:

gioielli
Italy
Local time: 23:04
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +2fleeting
gioielli
3Could it be 'flitting'?
Caryl Swift
3fighting
Peter Enright
2flirting
Erich Ekoputra


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Could it be 'flitting'?


Explanation:
From: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/flit:

flit (flt)
intr.v. flit·ted, flit·ting, flits
1. To move about rapidly and nimbly.
2. To move quickly from one condition or location to another.
n.
1. A fluttering or darting movement.
2. Informal An empty-headed, silly, often erratic person.

Noun 1. flit - a sudden quick movement
dart
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
2. flit - a secret move (to avoid paying debts); "they did a moonlight flit"
move, relocation - the act of changing your residence or place of business; "they say that three moves equal one fire"
Great Britain, UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Britain, GB - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland
Verb 1. flit - move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
dart, fleet, flutter
butterfly - flutter like a butterfly
hurry, travel rapidly, zip, speed - move very fast; "The runner zipped past us at breakneck speed"


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Note added at 26 mins (2006-10-23 20:24:27 GMT)
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Would any of those definitions or synonyms fit the action of the scene?

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-23 21:03:55 GMT)
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This seems to suggest that 'flighting' is sometimes used as the gerund form of 'fly (as in 'flee' ('flighting' rather than 'flying') :

http://tinyurl.com/ydf8sv

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-23 21:10:41 GMT)
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There's also this:

http://tinyurl.com/yekzlm ????



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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-23 21:12:20 GMT)
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And this:

http://tinyurl.com/yk3qyd

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 23:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 15
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
fleeting


Explanation:
time is often referred to as fleeting...

gioielli
Italy
Local time: 23:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Demyanov: Was my thought too. Would be nice if we could hear the soundtrack.
18 mins

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
19 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
flirting


Explanation:
gioielli's and Caryl's answers must be the closest in terms of pronounciation; but, to me, it's a bit off when applied in the context.

It is said that "Ian is losing on time". In chess, it means Ian did not make a required number of moves during his assigned time. (AFAIK, you must make 40 moves in 2 hours in world championship, but pls consult chess sites for sure).

So, fleeting and flitting (= moving or passing rapidly) could be OK when applied to time, but looks weird when applied to Ian. In fact, he must be slow in making moves, so he lost on time.

I offer flirting in this sense: deliberately expose oneself to (danger or difficulty). So, in previous moves, Ian might make a speculative move that was ill-calculated. He might flirt w/ a sacrifice or a blitzkrieg that turned out to be a blunder (see chess glossary for the meaning). Consequently, he was time-pressed in his next moves and eventually beaten by the clock.

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Note added at 12 hrs (2006-10-24 08:07:57 GMT)
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... he was time-pressed = he had to take long time to make next moves as to compensate for the blunder he made.

Erich Ekoputra
Indonesia
Local time: 04:04
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
fighting


Explanation:
Just a guess really. The other alternatives seem mighty odd.

I also agree with Erich, especially if one opponent is romantically interested in the other: Ian's losing the game is a means by which he flirts with his opponent.

Otherwise 'fighting' might work: the implication being 'This is how Ian fights - by losing the game'. More context might help.

Peter Enright
Australia
Local time: 07:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Erich Ekoputra: Thanks for the *agree*. However, "flirting" in my answer doesnt have anything to do w/ romance, but w/ "danger". The following sample is from Oxford dictionary: the need of some individuals to flirt with death.
23 hrs
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