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"key-stroke" vs. "key stroke" vs "keystroke"

English translation: keystroke

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11:22 Feb 18, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Computers (general) / input of characters with mobile phone keypad
English term or phrase: "key-stroke" vs. "key stroke" vs "keystroke"
if the three above variants equally correct ? I have used "key-stroke" but I am not sure ...

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It is evident that, in order to ensure efficiency of text input, the most frequent letters shall be inputted with minimum number of key-strokes, preferably with one key-stroke.
Alexander Onishko
Local time: 19:19
English translation:keystroke
Explanation:
My inclination would have been to use the hyphenated version, but then.... the single word is far, far commoner than the hyphenated version, so I change my mind, and use "keystroke".

The use of "key stroke" is definitely incorrect, as it suggests that the "key" is merely in apposition to the stroke, as in "major, important", which of course it is not...
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 18:19
Grading comment
many thanks, David and everyone ! and, in particular, Ken, thank you for your comment !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4keystrokeDavid Moore
4commentKen Cox
3 +1Keystroke
anna-b


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Keystroke
Keystroke


Explanation:
I think your solution should be OK.
But, for instance, in the user's manual of Finale (sw for music notation), whose original version is in English, it always speaks about "keystroke" (one word with no hyphen).





anna-b
Italy
Local time: 18:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Italian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  William [Bill] Gray
1 hr
  -> thanks!
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
key-stroke
keystroke


Explanation:
My inclination would have been to use the hyphenated version, but then.... the single word is far, far commoner than the hyphenated version, so I change my mind, and use "keystroke".

The use of "key stroke" is definitely incorrect, as it suggests that the "key" is merely in apposition to the stroke, as in "major, important", which of course it is not...

David Moore
Local time: 18:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
many thanks, David and everyone ! and, in particular, Ken, thank you for your comment !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Alphonse: Yes, "keystroke "is the standard.
2 hrs

agree  Buck
3 hrs

agree  Dylan Edwards
5 hrs

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
comment


Explanation:
Definitely 'keystroke' (in support of the previous answers). 'Key-stroke' would be understood correctly, but it appears old-fashioned. 'Key stroke' is incorrect for the reason given by David.

Genarlly speaking (perhaps better said, traditionally), compound nouns in English are formed with hyphens, and they tend lose the hyphen and be written as single words when they are used frequently. Also generally speaking, US English tends to drop the hyphen earlier than UK Enlgish, or to omit it right from the start.

When in doubt in specific cases, consult a good current dictionary. In this case, the Oxford Dictionary of English (among others) lists 'keystroke' with the meaning appropriate to your context.

Ken Cox
Local time: 18:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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