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steel pieces used for shuttering?

English translation: retaining wall plates/sheets

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:steel pieces used for shuttering?
English translation:retaining wall plates/sheets
Entered by: Grace Anderson
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11:36 Mar 11, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / construction
English term or phrase: steel pieces used for shuttering?
I'm trying to find the most appropriate and "compact" term to describe steel pieces, 250 mm wide, and 3 or 4 or 5 or 6 m long; they are vertically mounted, meant to prevent the side walls of a trench/well/dugout/channel/ditch from falling down;
can you think of a 'compact' term?
(for those of you who understand Polish, the original term is "wypraski katowickie", after the name of the manufacturer which is the "Katowice Steelworks" - Huta Katowice, though I'm afraid wypraski means mouldings, which refers to pieces made of plastics only (correct me from wrong)
anglista
Local time: 08:06
retaining wall plates/sheets
Explanation:
It sounds like you're talking about (temporary) retaining walls - see the links.


Selected response from:

Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 02:06
Grading comment
Thank you very much, each and every one of you has been very helpful. I regret to have to observe, there is one winner only and the winner takes all.
John Kinory was the first to answer and the closest to the idea but not to the term, I think. His PILING sounds very right, although what we need here is the structural elements of the piling rather than the structure itself.
GIRDERS are too solid (or so it seems) but even so, many thanks to Gayle Wallimann for the Zielinski connection (I even dropped Z. an e-mail but he hasn't answered yet).
Congratulations go to Michael Sebold for his RETAINING WALLS that put me on the right track.
'retaining wall' actually has an equivalent in Polish already ('œciana oporowa' OR 'mur oporowy') which, according to my Polish Lexicon of Science and Technology, means either one of the following: 1. one of the walls of a building or an independent structure intended to absorb the pressure of masses of soil, loose material or liquid immediately adjacent to the wall; or 2. a deep seated wall, built to arrest soil masses, e.g. on the external side of a road on a mountain side.
Therefore, I think WALL cannot be used in translating the term itself, although RETAINING is useful in explaining the function of the corrugated sheet structure, if necessary.
I find it indispensable to mention the material in the term (as MS did), so what I'm going to enter in my Polish-English glossary is CORRUGATED STEEL PLATES with the added explanation of its function ("to support the sides of a trench/ditch/channel etc.") – thank you very much again.

3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2pilingJohn Kinory
5steel pieces used for bracing
Michael Deliso
4 +1retaining wall plates/sheetsMichael Sebold
4corrugated steel girders
Gayle Wallimann
4 -1buttressAhmedAMS


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
piling


Explanation:
in BE

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-11 11:45:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

see e.g. Routledge (Ge>En) - related to the German \'Pfahl\'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-11 11:46:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You can use \'pile\' in the singular, but I\'ve mostly seen it used as the general term \'piling\', to keep the sides of trenches, canals, any excavation in civil engineering from collapsing. Around Canary Wharf in London, they are used to separate parts of the old docks, which are then drained and new buildings erected on them.

John Kinory
Local time: 07:06

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gayle Wallimann
2 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Berni Armstrong: From ditches to battle trenches, these have always been called piles.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
steel pieces used for bracing


Explanation:
BRACING(usually of metal strips) is used fasten walls, building sides etc. to prevent from falling while being remodeled.


    Reference: http://www.studio_barone.com
Michael Deliso
Local time: 08:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
buttress


Explanation:
It is a structure, usually brick or stone, built against a wall for support or reinforcement or anyething resembling a buttress.

AhmedAMS
Russian Federation
Local time: 10:06
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
brick or stone = not steel

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Berni Armstrong: Between the buttresses you will find the piling... or piles..
2 hrs

disagree  John Kinory: masonry structures, as you say: not steel components.
2 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: brick or stone = not steel

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
corrugated steel girders


Explanation:
I looked at google for references to
"wypraski katowickie" and found many hits. This is the one that seemed to correspond to what you are referring to. I put one reference below. I hope that this helps.


    encs.concordia.ca/bce/%20professorsnew/zielinski/ziepub.htm
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 08:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: In BE, at least, these are usually cross-pieces; doesn't sound like the one we want here.
28 mins
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
retaining wall plates/sheets


Explanation:
It sounds like you're talking about (temporary) retaining walls - see the links.





    Reference: http://www.archaeology.org/9907/etc/pisa.html
    Reference: http://alaska.dns2go.com/archives/week_of_02-05-01/juneau_ne...
Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 02:06
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you very much, each and every one of you has been very helpful. I regret to have to observe, there is one winner only and the winner takes all.
John Kinory was the first to answer and the closest to the idea but not to the term, I think. His PILING sounds very right, although what we need here is the structural elements of the piling rather than the structure itself.
GIRDERS are too solid (or so it seems) but even so, many thanks to Gayle Wallimann for the Zielinski connection (I even dropped Z. an e-mail but he hasn't answered yet).
Congratulations go to Michael Sebold for his RETAINING WALLS that put me on the right track.
'retaining wall' actually has an equivalent in Polish already ('œciana oporowa' OR 'mur oporowy') which, according to my Polish Lexicon of Science and Technology, means either one of the following: 1. one of the walls of a building or an independent structure intended to absorb the pressure of masses of soil, loose material or liquid immediately adjacent to the wall; or 2. a deep seated wall, built to arrest soil masses, e.g. on the external side of a road on a mountain side.
Therefore, I think WALL cannot be used in translating the term itself, although RETAINING is useful in explaining the function of the corrugated sheet structure, if necessary.
I find it indispensable to mention the material in the term (as MS did), so what I'm going to enter in my Polish-English glossary is CORRUGATED STEEL PLATES with the added explanation of its function ("to support the sides of a trench/ditch/channel etc.") – thank you very much again.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
3 days10 hrs
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