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chaser glass

English translation: It's the other way round

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00:45 Mar 31, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cooking / Culinary / Drinks
English term or phrase: chaser glass
As I understand it 'chaser' is a drink, like water or beer, that follows spirits. Therefore 'chaser glass' would be a larger size glass, anyway larger than a shot glass. Am I mistaken?
Ensor
Local time: 21:12
English translation:It's the other way round
Explanation:
A chaser is a strong drink after a weaker one. My father occasionally drank whisky chasers after beer.

Oxford says: a drink taken after another of a different kind, typically a strong alcoholic drink after a weaker one: drinking pints of bitter with vodka chasers.

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Note added at 12 hrs 5 mins (2004-03-31 12:51:15 GMT)
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Judging by the previous answers and subsequent comments, there seems to be a difference here between US and UK English. My answer is what I have always understood for the UK. However, Oxford only gives this definition (whereas it usually gives both meanings if there is a difference in usage)and Meriam Webster and American Heritage are American dictionaries.

So, Ensor, it looks as though you\'ll have to choose according to whether your context is US or UK.

Thanks for the useful comments.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 10 hrs 58 mins (2004-04-01 11:44:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To be honest, I don\'t know that we have a speacial glass for chasers in the UK. Whisky is usually served in a whisky tumbler or in a tot glass, which is smaller. See http://www.whiskymag.com/store/?REP_Retail_Section=12 for pictures.

Maybe a better boozer than me can help out here!
Selected response from:

Lesley Clayton
France
Local time: 14:12
Grading comment
Thanks for enlightening me. I don't necessarily agree with your (British) interpretation of chaser, but I appreciate your help with the whiskey glass terminology.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5It's the other way roundLesley Clayton
4 +4larger glass for a drink which immediately follows another
Todd Field
3 +1I'll drink to that!
jccantrell


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I'll drink to that!


Explanation:
How I understand it.

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Note added at 2004-04-01 03:13:25 (GMT)
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In the USA, the \'chaser\' is a beer (or some such) that follows a shot of strong drink, as Merriam Webster says:
Chaser: a mild drink (as beer) taken after hard liquor

Aaaah, the old days of drinking boilermakers, dropping depth charges and other assorted tomfoolery of the young!

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 05:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Hic!
59 mins
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
larger glass for a drink which immediately follows another


Explanation:
chaser = a lighter drink immediately following a more potent one (like club soda, fruit juice, water or beer following a shot of strong liquor).

chaser glass = the container for the chaser, so something larger than a shot glass

That's how I understand it. Good luck!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 28 mins (2004-03-31 17:14:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Take a close look at Lesley Clayton\'s answer. Apparently it is the opposite in the UK. So, your final translation will be entirely dependent upon whether your text is UK or US English.

Very interesting... you learn something new every day!

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 06:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: I think so too. A boiler maker would be a shot glass of whiskey and a large glass of beer.
44 mins

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
2 hrs

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
8 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
15 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
It's the other way round


Explanation:
A chaser is a strong drink after a weaker one. My father occasionally drank whisky chasers after beer.

Oxford says: a drink taken after another of a different kind, typically a strong alcoholic drink after a weaker one: drinking pints of bitter with vodka chasers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs 5 mins (2004-03-31 12:51:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Judging by the previous answers and subsequent comments, there seems to be a difference here between US and UK English. My answer is what I have always understood for the UK. However, Oxford only gives this definition (whereas it usually gives both meanings if there is a difference in usage)and Meriam Webster and American Heritage are American dictionaries.

So, Ensor, it looks as though you\'ll have to choose according to whether your context is US or UK.

Thanks for the useful comments.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 10 hrs 58 mins (2004-04-01 11:44:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To be honest, I don\'t know that we have a speacial glass for chasers in the UK. Whisky is usually served in a whisky tumbler or in a tot glass, which is smaller. See http://www.whiskymag.com/store/?REP_Retail_Section=12 for pictures.

Maybe a better boozer than me can help out here!

Lesley Clayton
France
Local time: 14:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for enlightening me. I don't necessarily agree with your (British) interpretation of chaser, but I appreciate your help with the whiskey glass terminology.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  PAS: curiouser and curiouser. Where I was brought up, it's the other way around. The Am. Heritage dictionary says likewise. The Thelonius Monk tune "Straight, No Chaser" indicates a straight shot and no chaser to follow.
51 mins

agree  Tony M: In the UK, this is the way I'm familiar with it; so, a small glass (spirits, etc.)
1 hr

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: This is the meaning I'm familiar with too (Ireland), though M.-W. says 'a mild drink (as beer) taken after hard liquor'
4 hrs

agree  Todd Field: Interesting... just goes to show how careful you have to be when translating!
8 hrs

agree  Hacene: a beer and a chaser vodka, at least here in the UK
10 hrs

agree  Grace Anderson
15 hrs
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