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carry out welding works [of, on, other preposition ?] ... steels

English translation: 'to carry out work on smth.' is the correct collocation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:carry out welding works [of, on, other preposition ?] ... steels
English translation:'to carry out work on smth.' is the correct collocation
Entered by: Caryl Swift
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

09:18 Mar 19, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general) / presentation
English term or phrase: carry out welding works [of, on, other preposition ?] ... steels
Please see the context below

===
Dear customers!
The boiler-welding shop offers manufacture and long-term deliveries of the following products:
....

We can carry out ***welding works of any alloy steels***, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding).
Alexander Onishko
Local time: 07:09
on - but please see below
Explanation:
carry out work on something is the full collocation

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2007-03-19 09:26:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry - I clicked the mouse in the wrong place.

However, I have some doubts as to the use of 'workS' here. I'd say that 'works' normally refers more to the place in which the job is done - the steelworks, for example. So here, I'd suggest 'work':

'We can carry out welding work on any alloy steels, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding).'

Another way to deal with it would be to drop the 'work(s)' altogether:

'We can carry out the welding of ..... '

but I don't know if the original text will allow you to do that?



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2007-03-19 09:33:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alexander, forgive me for asking, but do you really need the 'can' in the source sentence? I wonder if it's similar to Polish - where this modal verb is very often used in such circumstances? The thing is that, to my ear at any rate, in English it sounds a little uncertain, rather than positive. Is it possible for you to use either 'will', or just omit the modal altogether? In Polish, this doesn't change the meaning at all - in fact, it's the use of 'can' which makes the meaning more ambigious.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2007-03-19 09:38:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry - that last sentence should read 'Translating from Polish, this doesn't...'
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 06:09
Grading comment
many thanks, Caryl ! and all !

the final version is "We can carry out welding work on any alloy steels, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding)."

I don't think thnik that can brings any uncertainty here.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +7on - but please see below
Caryl Swift
4 +1weldMarie Scarano
1rephrase - improveMarek Daroszewski (MrMarDar)


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
weld


Explanation:
Why not simply use "weld" as a verb...
We can ***weld***, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding).



Marie Scarano
Italy
Local time: 06:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
rephrase - improve


Explanation:
Alexander - you could rephrase the original to make it more natural in English, possibly along the lines:

Our welding service expertise allows us to work with a wide range of materials, including...

Unless the customer restricts me I always do that.

Lowest confidence as this does not answer your question.

HTH


Marek Daroszewski (MrMarDar)
Local time: 06:09
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
on - but please see below


Explanation:
carry out work on something is the full collocation

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2007-03-19 09:26:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry - I clicked the mouse in the wrong place.

However, I have some doubts as to the use of 'workS' here. I'd say that 'works' normally refers more to the place in which the job is done - the steelworks, for example. So here, I'd suggest 'work':

'We can carry out welding work on any alloy steels, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding).'

Another way to deal with it would be to drop the 'work(s)' altogether:

'We can carry out the welding of ..... '

but I don't know if the original text will allow you to do that?



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2007-03-19 09:33:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alexander, forgive me for asking, but do you really need the 'can' in the source sentence? I wonder if it's similar to Polish - where this modal verb is very often used in such circumstances? The thing is that, to my ear at any rate, in English it sounds a little uncertain, rather than positive. Is it possible for you to use either 'will', or just omit the modal altogether? In Polish, this doesn't change the meaning at all - in fact, it's the use of 'can' which makes the meaning more ambigious.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2007-03-19 09:38:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry - that last sentence should read 'Translating from Polish, this doesn't...'

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 06:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
many thanks, Caryl ! and all !

the final version is "We can carry out welding work on any alloy steels, carbon steels, aluminium, copper (electric arc welding, argon-arc welding, contact welding, automatic submerged-arc welding)."

I don't think thnik that can brings any uncertainty here.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marie-Hélène Hayles
1 min
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Tony M: 'works' is sometimes used to refer to work being performed, but like you, I don't think it is right in this particular context.
9 mins
  -> You're right of course-the roadworks that automatically begin on the 1st day of spring and only end when the summer is over come to mind! Thank you :-)

agree  Melzie
11 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Jack Doughty
32 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Jörgen Slet
4 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc
16 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)
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