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lower reaches/downstream

English translation: Totally different

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03:02 Mar 8, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Science - Environment & Ecology
English term or phrase: lower reaches/downstream
2,000m in the lower reaches of the waste discharge outlet
2,000m downstream of the waste discharge outlet

Which one is correct? In my other question, a colleague said that "upper reaches" is more appropriate as "downstream" is a direction.
Denyce Seow
Singapore
Local time: 08:53
English translation:Totally different
Explanation:
I have to disagree with Paul here; it's not the outlet understood; when you use the expression "lower reaches", you should only be talking of a water-course like a river. You cannot possibly talk of the lower reaches of a waste/discharge outlet. As far as Gary D's posting is concerned, to me, the use of "from" sounds wrong here, but this may just be UK/US usage. I would very likely avoid that altogether by saying "above" and "below" the discharge outlet.

No-one in their right mind would say "above and below are vertical", not when you are talking outlets into a stream or river.

Lower reaches: a term used to describe the area or run of a river or stream shortly before it ends either by joining another river, or emptying into a lake, or flowing into the sea.

In your example, the "lower reaches" might be 100 miles away from the discharge point. And anywhere at all below the discharge point is correctly described as being "downstream of it", anything above it, "upstream of it".



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Note added at 6 hrs (2008-03-08 09:49:03 GMT)
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In a nutshell, your second sentence is perfect.

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Note added at 16 hrs (2008-03-08 19:35:47 GMT)
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Just to add a comment on "upper reaches": these are the areas shortly after the source of a river, so very much "upstream" of the lower reaches; the term "downstream" may be used not only as a direction, i.e. flowing in the direction of the mouth of a river, but also as an adverb of place, i.e. absolutely anywhere below where the speaker is standing, or the point which is mentioned.

Such as "Cologne lies downstream of Koblenz". "The upper reaches of the Rhine are above Lake Constance".
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 02:53
Grading comment
Thanks, everyone.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6Totally differentDavid Moore
4 +3not the samePaul Merriam


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
not the same


Explanation:
The "lower reaches" are the lower part of the outlet itself. The outlet apparently flows into a stream or river with a direction and downstream is where it flows next.

In your case, I think you mean downstream of the outlet.

Paul Merriam
Local time: 20:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  orientalhorizon
56 mins

agree  Gary D: I might even use 2 klm downstream from the waste discharge outlet.
6 hrs

neutral  Carol Gullidge: agree definitely with "downstream of the outlet". But the lower reaches would normally be applied to a fairly large (?) river and not to a waste-discharge outlet.
9 hrs

agree  Phong Le
21 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Totally different


Explanation:
I have to disagree with Paul here; it's not the outlet understood; when you use the expression "lower reaches", you should only be talking of a water-course like a river. You cannot possibly talk of the lower reaches of a waste/discharge outlet. As far as Gary D's posting is concerned, to me, the use of "from" sounds wrong here, but this may just be UK/US usage. I would very likely avoid that altogether by saying "above" and "below" the discharge outlet.

No-one in their right mind would say "above and below are vertical", not when you are talking outlets into a stream or river.

Lower reaches: a term used to describe the area or run of a river or stream shortly before it ends either by joining another river, or emptying into a lake, or flowing into the sea.

In your example, the "lower reaches" might be 100 miles away from the discharge point. And anywhere at all below the discharge point is correctly described as being "downstream of it", anything above it, "upstream of it".



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2008-03-08 09:49:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In a nutshell, your second sentence is perfect.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2008-03-08 19:35:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just to add a comment on "upper reaches": these are the areas shortly after the source of a river, so very much "upstream" of the lower reaches; the term "downstream" may be used not only as a direction, i.e. flowing in the direction of the mouth of a river, but also as an adverb of place, i.e. absolutely anywhere below where the speaker is standing, or the point which is mentioned.

Such as "Cologne lies downstream of Koblenz". "The upper reaches of the Rhine are above Lake Constance".

David Moore
Local time: 02:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks, everyone.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mark Nathan
1 hr

agree  Carol Gullidge: yes, downstream of (NOT from!) the outlet
3 hrs

agree  V_N
4 hrs

agree  juvera
4 hrs

agree  gavinlucas: Yes, the second sentence is correct.
12 hrs

agree  Rusinterp
2 days18 hrs
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