KudoZ home » English » Finance (general)

owning currancy

English translation: the proud winner of $2,000

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:the proud owner of $2,000
English translation:the proud winner of $2,000
Entered by: Nick Lingris
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

09:25 May 24, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general)
English term or phrase: owning currancy
I am currently disputing the following line with a copywriter: "...the proud owner of $2000..."
They claim that you can own currency to my comment of it not being possible to own money, and the line should read " the proud recipient/winner of $2000" Please note: American colloquial speach required here.
xxxwendyzee
Malta
Local time: 13:07
proud winner
Explanation:
If this has anything to do with a competition with a cash prize: "You are now the proud winner of $2,000".
The problem with "owner" is not just whether one says "I'm the owner of currency etc.", but that it would sound funny telling someone with oodles of money (from other sources) "you are the proud owner of $2,000"!
Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:07
Grading comment
Thank you so much Santo - nice touch about the rich people
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +5i much prefer recipient or winner
Mikhail Kropotov
4 +1proud winner
Nick Lingris
5owning currency..I really do own all of the currency that is in my pocket!!
airmailrpl


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
i much prefer recipient or winner


Explanation:
Besides sounding a bit weird (to my half-US-English ear), "owner" has a distinctly different meaning that you don't necessarily want there.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 35 mins (2005-05-24 10:01:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, does it end just like that, i.e. is cash implied? See below for an example.

\"What\'s up? I\'m the proud owner of $2000 worth of comics in a little over 2 weeks. Why? Who knows ...\"
http://comicspriceguide.com/forum2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3175

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 14:07
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jrb: definitely! NB the example below is owner of comics, not money...
34 mins
  -> Thanks. Sure.

agree  Balasubramaniam L.: I would have thought that currency is owned by the government that issues it. :-)
1 hr
  -> I am not sure I want to get into that... For instance, if you have a hundred 20-dollar bills in your wallet, you may be the owner of that money, am I wrong? It's just that "owner" is not the best word for the asker's text, if I understand it correctly.

agree  Ken Cox: IMO you can own particular objects (e.g. 100-dollar bills), but as an individual you cannot own currency (which is anyway a mass noun) any more than you can own air or water. It would be very unusual to say that you 'own' money; the usual term is 'have'.
2 hrs
  -> Very nice explanation.

agree  Nick Lingris
3 hrs
  -> Thank you. Nice explanation of the context you have there.

agree  Can Altinbay: I don't ever hear of money being owned. For that sense, I'd use "have". But I agree that "recipient/winner" is what we want here. Nice job, Mikhail.
5 hrs
  -> More praise than I deserve, buddy :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
owning currency..I really do own all of the currency that is in my pocket!!


Explanation:
of it not being possible to own money, => very strange concept!!

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 08:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  jrb: you're taking it too literally - it's not that the $ doesn't belong to you but that we simply don't use the term "own" to refer to it! e.g. I "have" some money in the bank/in my pocket...
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
proud owner
proud winner


Explanation:
If this has anything to do with a competition with a cash prize: "You are now the proud winner of $2,000".
The problem with "owner" is not just whether one says "I'm the owner of currency etc.", but that it would sound funny telling someone with oodles of money (from other sources) "you are the proud owner of $2,000"!

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you so much Santo - nice touch about the rich people

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov: Sure. This goes to what I was saying about "owner" just not fitting the bill.
12 mins
  -> This is actually more of a follow-up to your explanation, and should probably be "not for grading".
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search