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best before (end)

English translation: not quite

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07:03 Dec 3, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / expiry dates uncertainty
English term or phrase: best before (end)
Is "best before" and "best before end" identical???

Do these beers both expire on March 31:
"Best before April 2005"
"Best before end April 2005" ?

What if we have
"Best before 01/04/2005"
"Best before end 01/04/2005" ?

Thanks for your help!
Alex
Aleksandr Okunev
Local time: 07:51
English translation:not quite
Explanation:
best before April = expiry date 31 March
best before end April = expiry date 30 April

best before 01/04 = end of March
the last line makes no sense whatsoever, if at all, probably end of March and not at midnight on April 1st.
Selected response from:

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 06:51
Grading comment
Thanks a lot to everyone!
A week or so ago I sent a letter to Henry the Big Brother asking him to change grading system, making it possible to give points to more than one answer. This Kudoz is a good example that such a change would be quite expedient: while Edith (a bow) is the leader in essence, in time and the "agrees", the other two answers (two more bows) have been very helpful indeed, a few more pieces of the nearly completed puzzle, so to speak.
I must shut up.
Thanks a lot and have a very nice Sunday! :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +15not quite
EdithK
4 +5No they are not the same
Marijke Singer
4 +2--->>>almost identical
TranslatonatoR


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +15
not quite


Explanation:
best before April = expiry date 31 March
best before end April = expiry date 30 April

best before 01/04 = end of March
the last line makes no sense whatsoever, if at all, probably end of March and not at midnight on April 1st.

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 06:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot to everyone!
A week or so ago I sent a letter to Henry the Big Brother asking him to change grading system, making it possible to give points to more than one answer. This Kudoz is a good example that such a change would be quite expedient: while Edith (a bow) is the leader in essence, in time and the "agrees", the other two answers (two more bows) have been very helpful indeed, a few more pieces of the nearly completed puzzle, so to speak.
I must shut up.
Thanks a lot and have a very nice Sunday! :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie
13 mins
  -> Thanks jerrie

agree  conejo
25 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Kevin Kelly: Also, be careful about your numerical designation of dates if this is intended for a US audience. Most Americans read 01/04/2005 as January 4, 2005.
42 mins
  -> Thanks you are absolutely right

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: and so what if the beer is a bit musty..
1 hr

agree  tappi_k
2 hrs

agree  Asghar Bhatti
3 hrs

agree  Aisha Maniar
3 hrs

agree  seaMount
4 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
5 hrs

agree  Deborah Workman
6 hrs

agree  Java Cafe
8 hrs

agree  Neil Phillipson: cheers! It's Friday night
13 hrs

agree  KathyT
14 hrs

agree  trautlady
17 hrs

agree  Judith Kerman
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
--->>>almost identical


Explanation:
Best before - This is applied to foods intended to have a shelf life of three months or less, e.g. bread or hard cheeses. They are required to be marked with 'a day' and 'a month', e.g. Best before 04 March.

'Best before' may also be applied to foods with a shelf life of between three months and 18 months, provided it is marked with 'a day', 'a month' and 'a year', e.g. Best before 22 June 2003.

Best before end - This should be applied to foods intended to have a shelf life in excess of three months, e.g. frozen and tinned foods. They are required to be marked with 'a month' and 'a year', e.g. Best before end May 2002. Alternatively for products with a shelf life of over 18 months, this indication may be in the form of a year only, e.g. Best Before End 2004

Foods marked with "best before" or "best before end" dates may be sold after their marked dates, provided that they remain of good quality and fit for human consumption. In these circumstances we advise retailers to ensure that customers know that the date has expired before they make the decision to buy.

http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:ku2DhS7-8_IJ:www.warwic...

TranslatonatoR
Local time: 00:51
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Thanks a lot for this very helpful definitive statement!
4 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Lesley Clayton
5 hrs
  -> thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
No they are not the same


Explanation:
Strictly speaking no, they are not the same:

"Best before April 2005" - you should eat it before April starts
"Best before end April 2005" ? - you should eat it before April ends (i.e. before May starts)

What if we have
"Best before 01/04/2005" - you should eat it before the 1/04
"Best before end 01/04/2005" ? - you should eat it before the end of the 1st of April

These are "Date markings" and you can find an explanation at:
http://www.foodlaw.rdg.ac.uk/label/a-5.htm

They say:
Products with a recommended life of more than 3 months can use a date stating 'best before end'.

Therefore, your second example should not, in theory, be possible.

Marijke Singer
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  conejo
13 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  Tony M: True; but in practice, mfrs treat the term as if it were a 'best-before-end date' (and this term is often used when talking about them), hence why the 'end' sometimes gets left in by 'mistake'
4 hrs
  -> Yes, sometimes I think they like confusing us as consumers! Thanks, Dusty!

agree  Jörgen Slet
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jörgen!

agree  RHELLER: also my understanding: 30 day difference
7 hrs
  -> Thank you, Rita!

agree  KathyT
14 hrs
  -> Thank you, KathyT!
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