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cereal

English translation: anything from cornflakes to frosties (not porridge, not Muesli)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:(the every day meaning of) cereal
English translation:anything from cornflakes to frosties (not porridge, not Muesli)
Entered by: Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Options:
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11:44 Dec 10, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - Food & Drink
English term or phrase: cereal
Light Breakfast means cereal or toast only
Fluid means water.

Dictionary suggests that cereal means a breakfast food prepared from grain. Is it also called as porridge or it has some other special name? Thanks
Ketan
*******
Explanation:
I am not sure what your doubt is but here is my contribution. In the UK at least, anyone confronted by that sentence would assume that "cereal" meant Cornflakes, Frosties, Special K, or some such thing. If they meant porridge they'd have written porridge because porridge is cooked oats with milk and/or water. Muesli is yet another kind of breakfast cereal (it has oats and nuts and dried fruit and is not cooked). But again, if they meant this kind of breakfast ceral the they'd have written that.
HTH


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Note added at 1 hr 38 mins (2004-12-10 13:22:58 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

\"confronted with\" (not \"by\" I think is much better.
Selected response from:

Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Local time: 20:12
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! You have made the concept very clear. Sometimes, dictionaries fail to provide us with the practical meaning. The meaning explained by you was unavailable anywhere but this is just what I was looking for.
My sincere thanks to other contributors as well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2*******
Paula Vaz-Carreiro
4 +2Explanation below
Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
3 +1difference between cereal and porridge
Orla Ryan


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Explanation below


Explanation:
Definitions of cereal on the Web:

breakfast food prepared from grain, as in: My favorite cereal is Grape-Nuts; what's yours?
www.business-words.com/dictionary/S.html


Broad term for a group of grass plant species cultivated as food grains, where as barley is one.
www.foamrangers.com/brewhouse/glossary_C.html


Grass that produces an edible grain (e.g. oats, wheat, barley).
www.lbap.org.uk/HTML/glossary/defin.htm


grass such as wheat, oats, or corn, the starchy grains of which are used as food.
www.futureharvest.org/about/glossary.shtml


grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


grain: foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


a breakfast food prepared from grain
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


made of grain or relating to grain or the plants that produce it; "a cereal beverage"; "cereal grasses"
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




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Note added at 4 mins (2004-12-10 11:49:26 GMT)
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Definitions of porridge on the Web:

soft food made by boiling oatmeal or other meal or legumes in water or milk until thick
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


Oatmeal.
www.sallys-place.com/travel/oceania/glossary_australia.htm


Hot cooked (usually oatmeal) cereal.
www.idunno4recipes.com/KitchenGuide/GlossaryP.htm


Thick oatmeal rarely found on American tables since children were granted the right to sue their parents. The name is an amalgamation of the words \"Putrid,\" \"hORRId,\" and \"sluDGE.\"
www.geocities.com/southbeach/Palms/4722/rc_ccd.htm


Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
Bangladesh
Local time: 01:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  moken: Very good! :O) :O)
12 mins
  -> Thank you Álvaro

agree  Monika Rozwarzewska
26 mins
  -> Thank you Monika
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
difference between cereal and porridge


Explanation:
Porridge is a type of cereal, but is eaten hot, prepared with warm milk or water.

Cereals usually come pre-packaged and are ready to eat from the pack with a dash of milk, whereas you have to cook porridge.

However, diets usually specify whether you should eat porridge or cereal, so I think you can interpret this as standard breakfast cereal like Kelloggs' Corn Flakes etc.


    Reference: http://www.kellogs.com
Orla Ryan
Ireland
Local time: 20:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
*******


Explanation:
I am not sure what your doubt is but here is my contribution. In the UK at least, anyone confronted by that sentence would assume that "cereal" meant Cornflakes, Frosties, Special K, or some such thing. If they meant porridge they'd have written porridge because porridge is cooked oats with milk and/or water. Muesli is yet another kind of breakfast cereal (it has oats and nuts and dried fruit and is not cooked). But again, if they meant this kind of breakfast ceral the they'd have written that.
HTH


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 38 mins (2004-12-10 13:22:58 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

\"confronted with\" (not \"by\" I think is much better.

Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Local time: 20:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! You have made the concept very clear. Sometimes, dictionaries fail to provide us with the practical meaning. The meaning explained by you was unavailable anywhere but this is just what I was looking for.
My sincere thanks to other contributors as well.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Gabbutt
55 mins
  -> Thanks Jane

agree  Refugio: In the US, porridge is called 'hot cereal'. But it's not considered a light breakfast.
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Ruth (for the 'agree' and because now I know what porridge is called inthe States). ;-)
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