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whose vs. who’s

English translation: whose

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:whose vs. who’s
English translation:whose
Entered by: Caryl Swift
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:20 Aug 24, 2006
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / grammar
English term or phrase: whose vs. who’s
Group alignment options will be explained in more detail below with reference to two sample objects (in this case - images), [whose OR who’s ? ] starting position on the screen is as follows.
Alexander Onishko
Local time: 06:55
whose
Explanation:
'whose' - relative pronoun of possession

'who's' short form of who is - relative pronoun used to speak of a person

In this structure, 'whose' refers to possession and is not used only about people but about anything which posessess something else:

I stayed in a hotel whose staff were very friendly
(the staff belong to the hotel)

So, in your sentence, the starting position on the screen 'belongs' to the two sample objects - it's 'their' starting position


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Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-24 12:59:40 GMT)
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Re. 'whose' v. 'which' - although I agree in principle with CMJ_Trans et al regarding 'which', I also agree with sergey - 'whose' is used in this context in many grammar and course books (includiing those for the FCE, CAE and CPE)- which seems to suggest that such usage is now bith common and generally accepteped.

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Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-24 13:00:06 GMT)
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'bOth' - sorry

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Note added at 10 hrs (2006-08-24 23:16:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'accepted' - sorry again - it seems to have my day for typos . . .
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 05:55
Grading comment
many thanks to all !

Actually, as all the three answers are substantially identical, I had a difficult choice ...

Please forgive me and consider that I have selected all the three answers
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +17whosexxxsergey
5 +8whose
Marie-Hélène Hayles
4 +7whose
Caryl Swift


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
whose


Explanation:
whose = belonging to, pertaining to

who's = who is

Marie-Hélène Hayles
Local time: 05:55
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LukaszPL
9 mins

agree  Will Matter
11 mins

agree  Miroslawa Jodlowiec
20 mins

agree  Olga Layer
28 mins

agree  NancyLynn
30 mins

agree  Kim Metzger: http://www.bbctraining.com/pdfs/newsstyleguide.pdf
57 mins

agree  Mark Nathan
1 hr

agree  Suzan Hamer
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +17
whose


Explanation:
who's = who is

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Note added at 22 mins (2006-08-24 12:42:38 GMT)
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to cmj_trans: 'of which' was not an option in the asker's question. 'whose' is perfectly acceptable for inanimate objects in modern english , i've read about this quite recently in my 'practical english usage' book by michael swan. i don't have it with me as i spend my days in the british library where they offer wi-fi connection for my macbook - i am having my kitchen and bathroom replaced, and can't stand all that noise of hammering and drilling...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-24 17:09:40 GMT)
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now that i am back home :-) here is what my book says:

WHOSE and WHO'S

WHOSE is a possessive word meaning 'of whom/which', used in questions and relative clauses. WHO'S is the contraction of WHO IS or WHO HAS. compare:
e.g.
- WHOSE is that coat? (NOT: who's is that coat?)

- it was a decision WHOSE importance was not realised at the time. (NOT... who's importance...)

- do you know anybody WHO'S going to france in the next few days? (NOT: ... anybody whose going...)

- i've got a cousin WHO'S never been to london. (NOT... whose never been...)

there is a similar confusion between ITS and IT'S

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Note added at 5 hrs (2006-08-24 17:30:13 GMT)
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also found about OF WHICH; THAT... OF - they just sound less formal - there is nothing about old age ;-)

things: OF WHICH ; THAT ... OF

instead of WHOSE, we can use OF WHICH or THAT ... OF (less formal) to refer things, and these are sometimes preferred. the most common word order is NOUN + OF WHICH or THAT... OF, but OF WHICH... + NOUN is also possible.
compare the following four ways of expressing the same idea.

- he's written a book WHOSE NAME i've forgotten.
- he's written a book THE NAME OF WHICH i've forgotten.
- he's written a book THAT i've forgotten THE NAME OF.
- he's written a book OF WHICH i've forgotten THE NAME.

'practical english usage' by michael swan. oxford uni press 2005.

xxxsergey
Local time: 04:55
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angela Dickson: yes. a very large proportion of English native speakers get confused by this.//treading carefully on the age question... for me 'whose' is fine but I think I would probably write 'of which' for the reasons CMJ mentions.
1 min

agree  Marie-Hélène Hayles: I would use "whose", but CUP's Advanced Grammar In Use says: 'In formal written English, we often prefer ... "of which" ... to talk about things'
1 min

agree  Andrey Belousov
6 mins

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: in English today people use this though it is technically incorrect - whose is for people and of which is for things: it should thus be "the starting position of which" - you have to be my age to know that
6 mins

agree  LukaszPL
9 mins

agree  Will Matter: It's simple. "Who's" is always an abbreviation for "who is". If you can't substitute the one for the other the sentence needs revision. Kak dyela, sergey?
9 mins

agree  Rachel Fell: I agree with CMJ, actually, although this form is acceptable; I don't just thnk it's about age
11 mins

neutral  xxxEmmanuelleAn: CMJ is right about the which and whose difference. which would be the correct answer.It is still being taught in language schools.Nothing to do with age!
17 mins

agree  Alison Jenner: Agree with both CMJ and Rachel on this - and it's definitely not to do with age
19 mins

agree  Miroslawa Jodlowiec
20 mins

agree  Leny Vargas
20 mins

agree  Olga Layer
29 mins

agree  tappi_k
37 mins

agree  Jack Doughty: I also prefer "of which", which may or may not be due to my advanced age.
48 mins

agree  Rachel Nkere-Uwem: Agree with CMJ, Jack, Rachel et al
1 hr

agree  Mark Nathan: while I agree that "of which" is grammatically correct, "whose" does sound more natural in this sort of informal computer speak context.
1 hr

agree  RHELLER: in the U.S. we could also say "for which the"
3 hrs

agree  Suzan Hamer
8 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 day5 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
whose


Explanation:
'whose' - relative pronoun of possession

'who's' short form of who is - relative pronoun used to speak of a person

In this structure, 'whose' refers to possession and is not used only about people but about anything which posessess something else:

I stayed in a hotel whose staff were very friendly
(the staff belong to the hotel)

So, in your sentence, the starting position on the screen 'belongs' to the two sample objects - it's 'their' starting position


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-24 12:59:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re. 'whose' v. 'which' - although I agree in principle with CMJ_Trans et al regarding 'which', I also agree with sergey - 'whose' is used in this context in many grammar and course books (includiing those for the FCE, CAE and CPE)- which seems to suggest that such usage is now bith common and generally accepteped.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-24 13:00:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'bOth' - sorry

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2006-08-24 23:16:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'accepted' - sorry again - it seems to have my day for typos . . .

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 05:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
many thanks to all !

Actually, as all the three answers are substantially identical, I had a difficult choice ...

Please forgive me and consider that I have selected all the three answers

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LukaszPL
6 mins
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Will Matter
8 mins
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Miroslawa Jodlowiec
17 mins
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Olga Layer
25 mins
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Mark Nathan
1 hr
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  humbird: Good and detailed explanation!
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Susan! :-)

agree  Suzan Hamer
8 hrs
  -> Thank you! :-)
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Changes made by editors
Aug 24, 2006 - Changes made by writeaway:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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