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to Bear in

English translation: to come closer

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to bear in
English translation:to come closer
Entered by: Caryl Swift
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15:47 Apr 6, 2007
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / Popular
English term or phrase: to Bear in
"people sobbing their stories to interviewers while the camera bore in even closer on their pained, contorted faces."
kseraph
to come closer
Explanation:
"

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Note added at 15 mins (2007-04-06 16:03:32 GMT)
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I've been looking in various dictionaries and it seems that this is not a very common collocation - not in terms of being defined in a dictionary anyway. It's almost like a combination of 'to close in' and 'to bear down ':

"close in
1. To seem to be gathering in on all sides

bear down
1. To advance in a threatening manner".
( From: http://www.thefreedictionary.com )

However, I'd say that in your text it means that the camera - or rather the shots from the camera - are getting closer and closer to the faces of the people being interviewed. To me, it also seems to suggest that this is some way rather invasive and threatening.
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 18:15
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +7to come closer
Caryl Swift
5it is a phrasal verb and it should be: to bear down/bore downAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
to bear in
it is a phrasal verb and it should be: to bear down/bore down


Explanation:
bore down closer: to approach in a threatening manner or to make things worse:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bear

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 18:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 24
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
to bear in
to come closer


Explanation:
"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2007-04-06 16:03:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I've been looking in various dictionaries and it seems that this is not a very common collocation - not in terms of being defined in a dictionary anyway. It's almost like a combination of 'to close in' and 'to bear down ':

"close in
1. To seem to be gathering in on all sides

bear down
1. To advance in a threatening manner".
( From: http://www.thefreedictionary.com )

However, I'd say that in your text it means that the camera - or rather the shots from the camera - are getting closer and closer to the faces of the people being interviewed. To me, it also seems to suggest that this is some way rather invasive and threatening.

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 18:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Louise Mawbey
11 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Jack Doughty
28 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Alison Jenner
36 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  NancyLynn
39 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Peter Shortall
51 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: Count me too!
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Paula! :-)

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
3 days2 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)
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