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subjected my son to you for nothing

English translation: exposed my son...

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00:41 Feb 20, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: subjected my son to you for nothing
I subjected my son to you for nothing. For nothing.”
“How can you say that?” I stand up. I am finally as angry as he is. “What do you mean subjected him to me? What the fuck does that mean?”
Shirley Fan
Local time: 17:02
English translation:exposed my son...
Explanation:
The verb "to subject" means simply "to expose" a thing or person to someone or something, but the connotation is that the exposure is to something harmful or malevolent. One speaks of subjection to torture, prejudice, scolding, etc.

By saying that the "son was subjected to you", the connotation is that "you" is so evil, disagreeable, malevolent, harmful or odious that the mere presence is offensive. The second part of the sentence, "for nothing" implies that there should have been some sort of payment, reward or advantage conferred on the son in compensation for his exposure to so noxious a person, yet none was forthcoming.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-02-20 04:10:51 GMT)
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The object of this insult replies in startled confusion, "What the fuck does that mean?" presumably because he does not see himself as an odious person, though he well understands the negative gist of the statement.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-02-20 04:13:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I should add, that it is also possible that "for nothing" could refer to an expected reward for the parent of the son, not the son himself.
Selected response from:

Michael Barnett
Local time: 05:02
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5exposed my son...
Michael Barnett
4 +3made his son do something with this unpleasant or otherwise undesirable person
David Russi
3 +3I permitted my son to "endure" the absolute negative experience of being in your presence
Bernhard Sulzer


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
made his son do something with this unpleasant or otherwise undesirable person


Explanation:
It would seem to mean that he made his son participate in some activity with this presumably unpleasant or otherwise undesirable person only to find out later that he did not obtain the desired result.

David Russi
United States
Local time: 03:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bernhard Sulzer: and he uses this phrase to convey his very low opinion of the man, "nothing, nothing" was gained, a real insult.
3 hrs

agree  Jack Doughty
6 hrs

agree  writeaway: yes, explanation has to be simpler than the original text.
11 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
I permitted my son to "endure" the absolute negative experience of being in your presence


Explanation:
(why did) I let my son go through the trouble and unbelievably stupid experience (arranged by me) of being "exposed" for who knows how long a time to your good-for-nothing presence.

or:...had my son endure your (no)-good-for-nothing presence.

A very negative description by the first speaker to the other man of what it means to be in his (the other man's) presence: a not good for anything experience, awful, absolutely negative experience

It's meant to be a strong insult.

And the reaction proves it.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-20 02:17:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

long expl. for "good-for-nothing" presence:

there was nothing, absolutely nothing my son could have gained from being in your presence.

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 05:02
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Craig Meulen: Nice to see someone missed me ;-) Took time out, you can read about it: http://www.craig-in-nepal.blogspot.com/
7 hrs
  -> thank you, Craig! You were gone for awhile // looks like it was an interesting trip. Thanks for the link!

agree  PB Trans
9 hrs
  -> thank you very much, Pina!

agree  V_N
3 days20 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
exposed my son...


Explanation:
The verb "to subject" means simply "to expose" a thing or person to someone or something, but the connotation is that the exposure is to something harmful or malevolent. One speaks of subjection to torture, prejudice, scolding, etc.

By saying that the "son was subjected to you", the connotation is that "you" is so evil, disagreeable, malevolent, harmful or odious that the mere presence is offensive. The second part of the sentence, "for nothing" implies that there should have been some sort of payment, reward or advantage conferred on the son in compensation for his exposure to so noxious a person, yet none was forthcoming.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-02-20 04:10:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The object of this insult replies in startled confusion, "What the fuck does that mean?" presumably because he does not see himself as an odious person, though he well understands the negative gist of the statement.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-02-20 04:13:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I should add, that it is also possible that "for nothing" could refer to an expected reward for the parent of the son, not the son himself.

Michael Barnett
Local time: 05:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  orientalhorizon
18 mins
  -> Thanks OH!

agree  Craig Meulen
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Craig!

agree  Vicky Nash
5 hrs
  -> Thank you Vicky!

agree  writeaway: agree with you, but if subjected is a problem, exposed is probably a bit too sophisticated a word to use as explanation.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks writeaway! Clever name - as in write right now. :-)

agree  V_N
3 days18 hrs
  -> Thanks V_N !
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Changes made by editors
Feb 20, 2008 - Changes made by writeaway:
Field (specific)Poetry & Literature » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Feb 20, 2008:
Kudoz queueIn queue » Public


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