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09-02-2007

English translation: 9th February 2007

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:09-02-2007
English translation:9th February 2007
Entered by: Donatella M.
Options:
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22:55 Jul 12, 2008
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / certification
English term or phrase: 09-02-2007
Which is the best way to translate in English dates like this one (on a university degree certiificate containing dates, marks and subjects of examination, to be sent to an Australian University) without creating confusion about the real date?
Donatella M.
Local time: 21:58
9th February 2007
Explanation:
This is the correct Australian term. We always put the day first and the month in Word then the year in an official paper. This is because we get paperwork from both England, China and America and they all use a different format which is a lot of the times is hard to understand the format
the other one which is even more for legal paperwork is 9th day of February 2007.

Our general every day format for paperwork that will not be international, Ie: an invoice is 09/02/2007

Only Marinela Sandoval was close.

I am Australian.
Selected response from:

Gary D
Local time: 05:58
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +309/02/2007
Richard Benham
5 +19th February 2007
Gary D
5February 9, 2007
Marinela Sandoval
5Feb. 09, 2007
nakcl
3month in words
Liam Hamilton
32 September 2007
Juliette Scott


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Feb. 09, 2007


Explanation:
I usually indicate as above. It is not confusing and graceful.:-)

nakcl
Canada
Local time: 12:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in KoreanKorean
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Nakcl. I knew about the intl' standard, but I think is betetr to spell out the month, abbreviating it. It's a certificationwith a lot of examinations and marks. Better the mont abbreviated. Have a nice time

Asker: Iknow it could seem a "silly" question, to be cllassified as Non-Pro, but as you see, there are a lot of different interpretations, according to the coutry and to the kind of document. actually it's a degree certification (Italian University) containig the list of 47 examinations, the marks and the relevant dates. It is a swoorn translation for the admission to an australian university. In italian we use to write the date in the following way: 09/02/2007, but I know it can be confusing. So I think is better to spell out the month (but, at the moment) I have put it in the abbreviated way.

Asker: Thanks to you all


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mark Berelekhis
14 mins

neutral  Enza Longo: yes, but I wouldn't abbreviate the month - also 9 February 2007 if UK target - intl' standard is YYYYDDMM - agree with Richard for Australia the day must precede the month
23 mins

disagree  Richard Benham: Not for Australia. Whether you abbreviate the month or not, you can't put the day between the month and the year.
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
2 September 2007


Explanation:
If we are talking American it would be this.

Juliette Scott
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:58
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Juliette!!

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
09/02/2007


Language variant: Aussie English

Explanation:
Either slashes or hyphens are fine. If the year is last, the day MUST precede the month in Australia (as in the UK). I am assuming that your original date is in European format (dd-mm-yyyy).

If you put 2007/02/09, that would be interpreted as 9 February 2007 in Australia, although the format is less common. In other words, you either go big to small or small to big.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 21:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Richard and the others


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Enza Longo
12 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  Gary D: I agree, But for an offical international paper I always spell the month, (If the university sends the document to America, China etc it will be MM/DD/YY in this format.)
6 hrs
  -> I agree, but in a note to Nakcl, the asker said "I have put it in the abbreviated way". So I was giving the correct abbreviation for an Australian university.

agree  Dana Rinaldi: I always spell the month too
6 hrs
  -> I agree, but in a note to Nakcl, the asker said "I have put it in the abbreviated way". So I was giving the correct abbreviation for an Australian university.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
February 9, 2007


Explanation:
Very simple and precise. Not confusing either

Marinela Sandoval
United States
Local time: 14:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Marinela!

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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
month in words


Explanation:
as already shown, writing the date in numeric form creates confusion - I am not sure if it is February or September!

Liam Hamilton
Bulgaria
Local time: 22:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thankks Liam. I agree with you

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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
9th February 2007


Explanation:
This is the correct Australian term. We always put the day first and the month in Word then the year in an official paper. This is because we get paperwork from both England, China and America and they all use a different format which is a lot of the times is hard to understand the format
the other one which is even more for legal paperwork is 9th day of February 2007.

Our general every day format for paperwork that will not be international, Ie: an invoice is 09/02/2007

Only Marinela Sandoval was close.

I am Australian.

Gary D
Local time: 05:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 18
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many Thanks Gary. Finally to be clearer helps! I don't complletely agree with the classification Non-Pro. Actually it has been the post that received the highest number of different answers!It's a simple date, that's true, but it's the context that makes making it difficult to choose the best way to express it without confusing the final user of an official certificate used to receive so many different documents from all over the world. Thanks for your kind help.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
9 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (1): WendellR
Non-PRO (3): writeaway, Emanuela Galdelli, Mark Berelekhis


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Changes made by editors
Jul 12, 2008 - Changes made by Mark Berelekhis:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO
Jul 12, 2008 - Changes made by writeaway:
Language pairItalian to English » English
FieldLaw/Patents » Social Sciences
Field (specific)Law (general) » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters


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