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welcome change/welcomed change

English translation: welcome change

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Which is correct welcome change/welcomed change
English translation:welcome change
Entered by: Sonia Gomes
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:51 Mar 13, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: welcome change/welcomed change
Please tell me which one is correct: welcome change or welcomed change.

Thanks
ying
welcome change
Explanation:
As Elizabeth pointed out the entire sentence would have been good. t

Welcome change could be used if the context such as in this case
We had been eating prawns everyday and chicken was a welcome change.

Hope this wiil be of some use.

Sonia
Selected response from:

Sonia Gomes
Local time: 05:23
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +15welcome change
Sonia Gomes
4 +6Not for kudoz....David Moore
4 +5this depends on context
EdithK


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
this depends on context


Explanation:
1) if you are happy that something has changed: a welcomed change
2) if you wish that something will change: I would welcome change

So, without more context, difficult to answer.

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 01:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: my thoughts exactly
13 mins
  -> Thanks, though Sonia's suggestion below is another alternative under 2).

agree  Oleg Sollogub
15 mins
  -> Thanks Oleg.

agree  chopra_2002
41 mins
  -> Thanks, a most welcome agree, without the *d*

agree  lindaellen
45 mins
  -> Thanks Linda.

agree  IrinaGM
2 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +15
welcome change


Explanation:
As Elizabeth pointed out the entire sentence would have been good. t

Welcome change could be used if the context such as in this case
We had been eating prawns everyday and chicken was a welcome change.

Hope this wiil be of some use.

Sonia

Sonia Gomes
Local time: 05:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: IMO "a welcome change" is the more usual expression - you can describe something as a welcome change even if it happened in the past
17 mins
  -> Thank you Armorel, that is what I thought too

agree  Charlie Bavington: never used "welcomed" change and don't remember ever seeing it either. I wonder if there's a geographical difference (I'm English). Maybe wait for the American contigent to wake up for confirmation :-) !
40 mins
  -> Charlie thank you very much. It is a very warm evening here.!!

agree  David Moore
56 mins
  -> David, thank you

agree  Mario Marcolin: "welcomed" would be an ellipsis for something like " that has been welcomed
1 hr
  -> Mario thank you

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
2 hrs
  -> Thank you Heidrun

agree  IrinaGM: Yes, we use "a welcome change" in U.S.
2 hrs
  -> Irina, Thank you

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
3 hrs
  -> Gracias Madeleine.

agree  RHELLER
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Rita

agree  Kristina Thorne
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Kristina

agree  NancyLynn: The Canadian contingent says : adjective, not past participle
6 hrs
  -> NancyLynn thank you very much

agree  Refugio
17 hrs
  -> Ruth, Thank you

agree  Lesley Clayton
23 hrs
  -> Lesley Thank you

agree  EKM: I've only seen "welcome change" so far. Welcomed change is technically correct, but rings slightly odd.
2 days14 hrs
  -> Marten, thanks a lot

agree  senin
3 days3 hrs
  -> Senin, muchas gracias

agree  Tahir
3 days7 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tahir
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Not for kudoz....


Explanation:
Let's get into semantics. "Welcome" here is used as an adjective; "welcomed" as a verbal past participle. The latter can also be used adjectivally, but is not common, partly because it's easier to say without the final "D", and we tend to be notoriously lazy in that direction.... IMO, "welcome*D*" is extremely uncommon anyway, but would invariably be used AFTER change, as in e.g. "change is/was/would be/etc., welcomed. Even here, "welcome" is far commoner. Think for example of the following: "Party guests will be welcomed on arrival by Mr and Mrs....". This is a clear verbal use, but it will often be written "... will be MADE welcome on arrival...."

David Moore
Local time: 01:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Gilman: to Charlie's question: the -d version is not American dialect.
28 mins

agree  NancyLynn: nor is it Canadian
5 hrs

agree  humbird: I seldom come across "welcomed change". Besides, I like your semantics. Well presented.
5 hrs

agree  Refugio
16 hrs

agree  Lesley Clayton
22 hrs

agree  senin
3 days2 hrs
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