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in flagrante (delicto)

English translation: in flagrante delicto

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19:29 Mar 5, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Government / Politics
English term or phrase: in flagrante (delicto)
This phrase nearly always appears with the "in". Can I use the phrase without the "in", as in:

"During their mandate, Members of Parliament also benefit from immunity in that they cannot be arrested except in the case of flagrante delicto, thus preventing them from being arrested for hidden political reasons."

If not, how could I re-word it?
Timothy Barton
Local time: 01:04
English translation:in flagrante delicto
Explanation:
"During their mandate, Members of Parliament also benefit from immunity in that they cannot be arrested except in the case of BEING CAUGHT IN flagrante delicto, thus preventing them from being arrested for hidden political reasons."
Selected response from:

Lynn Cox
Local time: 01:04
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +18in flagrante delictoLynn Cox
4I don't think soAlexander Demyanov


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +18
in flagrante delicto


Explanation:
"During their mandate, Members of Parliament also benefit from immunity in that they cannot be arrested except in the case of BEING CAUGHT IN flagrante delicto, thus preventing them from being arrested for hidden political reasons."

Lynn Cox
Local time: 01:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Demyanov
1 min

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 min

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro
6 mins

agree  erika rubinstein
9 mins

agree  Irene Schlotter, Dipl.-Übers.: That reads smoothly...
10 mins

agree  Tony M
18 mins

agree  Can Altinbay: I wouldn't go ahead on the other suggestion on the basis of a few hundred Google hits.
19 mins

agree  Robert Fox: literally (as I remember from my school Latin - which I hated!!) 'while the crime is blazing'. You need the 'in' as it is part of the Latin phrase.
27 mins

agree  inmb: I have similar memories about Latin classes ...
41 mins

agree  Alex Lane: You can actually get away with leaving off the 'delicto' and folks will know what you mean. The 'in' is, however, necessary.
1 hr

agree  Cristina Santos
1 hr

agree  airmailrpl: -
3 hrs

disagree  Anton Baer: I think you're all wrong.
4 hrs

agree  Deborah Workman: Yes, especially per Robert and Alex. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flagrante_delicto. "cannot be arrested unless caught in flagrante delicto".
7 hrs

agree  kmtext: if you look up flagrante delicto in the dictionary, it tells you to look under in flagrante delicto, which is good enough for me!
12 hrs

agree  webguru
15 hrs

agree  Inge Dijkstra
16 hrs

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc
17 hrs

agree  Will Matter: They need to be 'caught in the act', as it were.
23 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
2 days34 mins
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I don't think so


Explanation:
in f.d. basically means "in the course of doing something one shouldn't be doing".

Although some dictionary sources define "flagrante delicto" without "in", I believe they are mistaken. For example, the American Heritage Dictionary offers:

flagrante delicto

SYLLABICATION: fla·gran·te de·lic·to
PRONUNCIATION: fl-grnt d-lkt
ADVERB: 1. In the very act of committing an offense; red-handed. 2. In the act of having sex.


If that definition was correct then "in flagrante delicto" would mean "IN IN the act...".

If you enter "flagrante delicto" on the Merriam-Webster site, you'll be redirected to "in f.d.".


If you used "...cannot be arrested except in the case of flagrante delicto", it would mean, roughly, "...except in the case of a crime being committed" (with no attribution to any Members of the Parliament), meaning that if a crime was committed (by anybody), a member of Parliament could be arrested.

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 20:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 15
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