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[try] to lie one's way out of trouble

English translation: get yourself out of a difficult situation by lying

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18:07 Feb 14, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
English term or phrase: [try] to lie one's way out of trouble
What is the meaning of the idiom?
To escape?
Tsogt Gombosuren
Canada
Local time: 19:54
English translation:get yourself out of a difficult situation by lying
Explanation:
In a nutshell.

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Note added at 8 mins (2005-02-14 18:16:28 GMT)
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Let\'s say, for example, you\'ve forgotten to do your homework. When your teacher asks you where it is you make up a story about the dog eating it to try and \"get out of trouble\", ie avoid being punished by the teacher for not doing your homework.

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Note added at 15 mins (2005-02-14 18:23:37 GMT)
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Some people who might lie to get themselves out of trouble:

unfaithful spouses
politicians (part of the job description)
schoolchildren
translators who are behind schedule
Selected response from:

James Calder
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:54
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10get yourself out of a difficult situation by lying
James Calder
5 +5To tell untruthsDavid Moore


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
To tell untruths


Explanation:
in order not to be found out in wrongdoing.
Of course, we all know that doesn't work too well, don't we...
The little boy whose football smashes a window says when asked: "No, it weren't me". And if he forfeits his football, he might not get punished for it. So he "lied his way out of trouble"

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Note added at 7 mins (2005-02-14 18:15:49 GMT)
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Of course, the little boy didn\'t speak such good English, otherwise he would have said: \"No, it was not I\" - or maybe \"No, it wasn\'t me\" which is pretty colloquially accepted, although strictly incorrect.

David Moore
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jccantrell: yep, to tell a story that deflects blame away from you, even if only for a short time.
10 mins

agree  Lawyer-Linguist
16 mins

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
2 hrs

agree  Will Matter
2 hrs

agree  astlala
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
get yourself out of a difficult situation by lying


Explanation:
In a nutshell.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-02-14 18:16:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Let\'s say, for example, you\'ve forgotten to do your homework. When your teacher asks you where it is you make up a story about the dog eating it to try and \"get out of trouble\", ie avoid being punished by the teacher for not doing your homework.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2005-02-14 18:23:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Some people who might lie to get themselves out of trouble:

unfaithful spouses
politicians (part of the job description)
schoolchildren
translators who are behind schedule

James Calder
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nesrin
13 mins

agree  Lawyer-Linguist
19 mins

agree  jerrie: good examples ;-))
32 mins

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: good answer!
39 mins

agree  RHELLER
53 mins

agree  Rania KH
1 hr

agree  Misiaczek
2 hrs
  -> Thanks all

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
2 hrs

agree  Will Matter
2 hrs

agree  Lamberto Victorica: good shot
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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