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ON or AT the website?

English translation: on vs at

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:ON or AT the website?
English translation:on vs at
Entered by: jerrie
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:44 Jan 1, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Internet, e-Commerce / internet
English term or phrase: ON or AT the website?
I've been confused about this for a while now: is the correct English term "ON the website" or "AT the website"? Or are both possible?
Thanks
Nils Vanbellingen
Local time: 10:09
on vs at
Explanation:
Information is displayed on the website

Come and visit us at our website



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 22:51:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.ncb.org.uk/news/whatsnew.asp
What\'s new on the website

If you would like to take a look at the website click here.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 22:55:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please feel free to e-mail us here at the website that loves Bristol.
Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:09
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +14on vs at
jerrie
5 +7on v at (extra information)Peter Coles
5 +1"ON the website" page
airmailrpl
3just an extra thoughtpercebilla


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +14
on vs at


Explanation:
Information is displayed on the website

Come and visit us at our website



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 22:51:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.ncb.org.uk/news/whatsnew.asp
What\'s new on the website

If you would like to take a look at the website click here.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 22:55:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please feel free to e-mail us here at the website that loves Bristol.

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Alaa Zeineldine
0 min
  -> Thanks

disagree  airmailrpl: Come and visit our website
2 mins
  -> As you can see, depending on context, 'at the website' is used

agree  Marian Greenfield
8 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Kim Metzger: "at" for giving directions to the site - e.g. how to get there.
9 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  JCEC
18 mins

agree  Swaiyam
25 mins

agree  Fuad Yahya
28 mins

agree  Amy Williams
33 mins

agree  Spiros Doikas
1 hr

agree  Peter Coles: With Jerrie's examples. The choice is dependent on the verb that you are use. See longer note below.
1 hr

agree  xxxsimantov
1 hr

agree  Giusi Pasi
3 hrs

agree  xxxEDLING
8 hrs

agree  Piotr Kurek
11 hrs

agree  vixen
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"ON the website" page


Explanation:
is the correct English term "ON the website" or "AT the website"? Or are both possible?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 23:05:04 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

index
... Click on the website below and see for yourself. Then get to the home page for the
website and look for the source of all the other photos on this WebQuest. ...
www.geocities.com/roderol/webquest3.html

WAGE - Project Information - Welcome -
... wage.eu.com. To find out what has changed on the site since your lastvisit, view the What\'s new on the website page. If you require ...
www.wage.eu.com/project_info/welcome2.html

Investor Relations -
... section. Available methods for contacting the investor relations
representative will also be published on the website page. The ...
www.firstib.com/about/ir/irp

... It is the first thing that the searchers, as well as the search engine spiders, see. Be sure to have text on the website page. If ...
www.isubmit.com/subtips.html -

University Core Curriculum of Fairleigh University: Home Page -
... On the website page there are links back to the syllabus. At the head of each website page and each syllabus are links to all the syllabi. ...
alpha.fdu.edu/core/

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 05:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  smarinella
4 mins
  -> thank you

neutral  Kim Metzger: Where's your explanation?
10 mins
  -> is that enough???

neutral  jerrie: on the website is sufficient, you don't need to add page
11 mins
  -> references above for both

neutral  xxxsimantov: Jerrie is right.
1 hr
  -> we will leave the decison to the asker
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
on v at (extra information)


Explanation:
This is an extra suggestion intended to supplement Jerrie's answer. Credit for the correct response should still go to Jerrie.

The use of "on" or "at" depends on the verb that you are using, not the fact that it has website as its object. That's why in different situtions you get different, apparently contradictory, answers.

Therefore if you are displaying information, you will normally display it "on" a notice board, "on" a poster or even "on" a website.

However, if you think of the website as a virtual (or physical) place, then you would visit us "at" our website (or "at" our home, "at" our shop, "at" our office etc.).

Equally, as was pointed out, you may simply visit our website, our office, our home, etc without the need for a preposition at all.

I hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-05 16:58:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This Note is to answer Nikita\'s question below ...

\"Our catalogue on / at this site ...\" is a noun phrase, i.e. it doesn\'t contain an explicit verb to dictate whether \'on\', \'at\' or some other preposition is correct.

In this particular example you could use either \'on\' or \'at\' and be perfectly understood by a native speaker of English.

There are some very slight nuances depending on the context in which the phrase is spoken or written, and the precise meaning intended.

For example, if the phrase were written on the site\'s homepage, I would expect the intended meaning to be something like \"Our catalogue, which you can access/consult/use on this site, isn\'t complete\". \'On\' feels right to me here because the reader is already on the site and therefore close to the catalogue. It\'s \'on\' the site, just in front of them.

Alternatively, if the phrase were spoken in a meeting where \'this site\' were the topic of discussion, the site is somewhere else and so the meaning would be more like \"Our catalogue, which customers can access/see/use at this site, isn\'t complete.\" \'At\' feels very slightly preferable to \'on\' here as the site is somewhere else, though in this case I believe that most native English speakers would be equally happy to use \'on\'.

Sadly there\'s no single rule that can be mechanically applied to dictate the appropriate use of each preposition, only clues (such as look at the verb and the context), and our experience of literally thousands of different examples to which we are exposed as we become fluent in a language.

It\'s further complicated by inconsistencies between different speakers of the same language. The first time an American told me that \"It\'s ten of three\" (or should that be \"ten off three\") I had absolutely no idea what he was talking about. I\'m British, so for me the only sensible preposition in this situation is \'to\'.

So, how does one cope with all this uncertainty - here\'s my tip, based on years of struggling with French prepositions and Japanese postpositions. If you\'re not sure which preposition to use, and all the rules are going round and around in head causing more confusion than clarification, sit back, close your eyes, expell all the rules from your brain, then repeat each possibility out loud several times and chose the one that sounds the most natural - you\'ll usually be right (and you can always double check on ProZ.com if it\'s important).

Good luck.



Peter Coles
Local time: 09:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxsimantov: Excellent exegesis.
46 mins

agree  Refugio: Or, if you think of it as a microcosm, IN the website
5 hrs

agree  xxxEDLING
7 hrs

agree  Paul Svensson
8 hrs

agree  Marie Scarano
8 hrs

agree  theangel: perfect
8 hrs

agree  Nikita Kobrin: I like your explanation best of all. But the usage of preposition is still not quite clear to me. E.g.: "Our catalogue on (at?) this site isn't complete". After reading your clarification I’m inclining to use "on". Correct? All by myself I’d use “at”.
3 days14 hrs
  -> An interesting example. See the note above for my suggestion.
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
just an extra thought


Explanation:
just an addition to the previous ones,not for points. if you imagine someone standing beside a blackboard,ready to write things on it. Where is he? AT the blackboard-not on it or in it. the things he writes, he writes ON it,however.

percebilla
Local time: 10:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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