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The data is pursuant to ISO.

English translation: ISO-compliant or ISO-conform data

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17:08 Mar 4, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - IT (Information Technology) / IT
English term or phrase: The data is pursuant to ISO.
It is designed so that the data is pursuant to ISO.
Is the above sentence OK?
Thank you for your help.
Mitsuko
Local time: 21:17
English translation:ISO-compliant or ISO-conform data
Explanation:
The data are ISO-conform (or ISO-compliant).

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Note added at 2002-03-04 17:15:14 (GMT)
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Example:
Advanced ISO-compliant manufacturing processes, stringent quality testing, and sophisticated predictive maintenance features have made our products the market leaders in superior reliability for more than a century.

http://www.rockwellautomation.com/products/index.html
Selected response from:

Christa Zeller Thomas
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I used "ISO-compliant data"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3the data complies/conforms with ISO (standard No. xxxx)Michael Sebold
4 +4ISO-compliant or ISO-conform dataChrista Zeller Thomas
5The sentence is incorrectJohn Kinory
4I think there is a dual possibility ....
Hermeneutica
4All the data in order to get the ISOKenji Otomo


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the data complies/conforms with ISO (standard No. xxxx)


Explanation:
For consideration.

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Note added at 2002-03-04 17:52:19 (GMT)
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If you have the ISO standard with which the data complY, then it might be to your advantage to include it. If you don\'t have it, then I would say \"the data are designed to be ISO-compliant (ISO-conform is awkward).\" To say that they \"are\" ISO comliant implies that ISO has already given its approval, which you might not want to do.

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Note added at 2002-03-04 18:24:13 (GMT)
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Something else to consider - it\'s likely that the ISO standard in question applies to the data structure or the process of collecting or handling the data (in order to ensure its accuracy, non-contamination, ect.) - if this is the case, it might be to your advantage to specify this.

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Note added at 2002-03-04 23:54:06 (GMT)
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Here\'s Oxford\'s note on usage:
This word is now often used with a singular verb (like \'information\'), ESPECIALLY in the context of computers, e.g. \"the data IS entered here,\" but it is by origin a Latin plural (the singular is \'datum\') and in other contexts should be used (like \'facts\') with a plural verb, \"these data are from official sources.\"

So, Mitsuko, in light of your IT context, it would seem perfectly legitimate to use a singular verb.

For those of you further interested in this growing controversy, I would direct you to the article below, which talks about language as something that\'s alive and forever evolving (thankfully so, for we no longer communicate like our cave-dwelling ancestors).

http://europa.eu.int/comm/translation/theory/nida.htm

Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 08:17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  athena22: This is much better!
1 min
  -> Thank you.

agree  jccantrell
4 mins
  -> Thanks, JC.

agree  edlih_be
5 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Mary Maksimova
11 mins
  -> Thanks, Mary.

agree  Attila Piróth
13 mins
  -> Thanks, Attila.

disagree  John Kinory: data comply/conform
15 mins
  -> Thanks for the grammar reminder - you will find, however, that the treatment of "data" as singular has become commonplace.

disagree  Steven Geller: I agree with John. Data is not singular.
6 hrs
  -> Fair enough - Indeed, I have made adjustments to my answer to account for that purist fact. While I don't think that it's the most important part of my suggestion, I would point you to the article I identified below in my comments to John.
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
ISO-compliant or ISO-conform data


Explanation:
The data are ISO-conform (or ISO-compliant).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-04 17:15:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Example:
Advanced ISO-compliant manufacturing processes, stringent quality testing, and sophisticated predictive maintenance features have made our products the market leaders in superior reliability for more than a century.

http://www.rockwellautomation.com/products/index.html

Christa Zeller Thomas
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I used "ISO-compliant data"

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory
14 mins

agree  Christina Clark
21 mins

agree  Alaa Zeineldine: ISO-compliant or ISO-conformant. While the purists may disagree with "conformant", the term is common in standards documentation.
1 hr

agree  Sue Goldian
14 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I think there is a dual possibility ....


Explanation:
Either the data was arrived at in accordance with ISO procedures, or perhaps it is being presented or selected in accordance with ISO, THEN EITHER the data is compliant, conform, etc., or perhaps as you say pursuant, but then I would think it would be a matter of "calculated/presented/etc. pursuant to", i.e. following the requirements for calculation or presentation that are contained in ISO (and yes, which ISO?)

HTH

Dee

Hermeneutica
Switzerland
Local time: 14:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  John Kinory: Data were...
7 mins
  -> LOOK AT THE QUESTION. IT SAYS DATA "IS". STRICTLY SPEAKING I AGREE WITH YOU AS I TEND TO BE A PURIST BUT USAGE IS TRULY DIVIDED, UNFORTUNATELY.

agree  Mike Sekine: don't worry Dee, the dude's just old and grumpy.. let him have his 15 minutes of fame.
4 hrs
  -> Well, he ain't that old, & grumpy is not the word... actually he has a point ºthis timeº, I guess we all just concentrated on the overall sense of the sentence and left the grammar issue untouched - so there really are TWO things wrong with the sentence.
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
All the data in order to get the ISO


Explanation:
The data they have in order to get the ISO (International Standard Organization). ISO Quality Certificate proofs the company has accomplished all the quality standards. The most common is ISO 9001 but it depends of the company activity. The ISO is very important for export or import companies because it means that the company is serious, competitive, accurate; and most of the companies are unknown for the others.

Kenji Otomo
Spain
Local time: 14:17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: How does that answer the question asked?
6 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The sentence is incorrect


Explanation:
Thanks, Dee, for pointing out that I need to look at the question. I believe I have. The question as asked was:

Is the sentence OK?

Well, it isn't, and I agreed with those who used data in the plural and disagreed with those who regarded it as singular. 'Commonplace', whatever that means, is not the same as correct. We are professional translators, and we should be able to write correct English.

And using caps is shouting, and is considered rude behaviour in usenet.



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Note added at 2002-03-05 00:39:25 (GMT)
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Two people here seem to think I am a doddering fool. Mary\'s comments I have no problems with. Mr Sekine\'s comments are of a kind that have rightly brought down the wrath of Proz staff on the offending parties.
Well, I work a lot IN the computer industry, so I am aware of the many linguistic corruptions there. But unlike many in the towers of Seattle (I didn\'t say \'all\'), I am also a linguist and have some respect for language. So I will continue to insist on the plural. It\'s not a \'new generation\' issue, because I believe I can count myself among the more open-minded Hebrew translators, e.g. as far as proper neologisms are concerned.

John Kinory
Local time: 13:17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mary Worby: Although it pains me to suggest it, you cannot stand like Cnut in the face of progress ... (absolutely no offence meant, but 'data is' is accepted terminology for the computer industry and the new generation (-:)
3 hrs
  -> Mary, as you know, Canute did no such thing :-) As others have said, current usage in the computer industry is a known fact. But Oxford only says 'often used', not that it is correct.

neutral  Berni Armstrong: Everyone should be entitled to their opinion without anybody adding a personal remark. Note: I use "they" to avoid he/she - some hate it some love it. Time will tell. No RAE or RAF in English.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Berni. I believe you are a moderator: are you going to take Mr Sekine to task? I'd appreciate it.

neutral  Michael Sebold: Hi John. I think we would do well to move this building discussion to a forum. Indeed, the following article would be a good starting point. http://europa.eu.int/comm/translation/theory/nida.htm
3 hrs
  -> No problem on my part :-) Perhaps it would also draw the moderators' attention to Mr Sekine's abusive behaviour.
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