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don't blame the baker if the butcher bakes the bread

English translation: for what it's worth ...

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19:39 Feb 9, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Journalism / Proverbs / Idioms
English term or phrase: don't blame the baker if the butcher bakes the bread
I know this a quite common expression, but can someone explain the meaning of it for me? Thanks.

..."Don't blame somebody else, since you've asked for it / you deserve it"?
fastacc
English translation:for what it's worth ...
Explanation:
I've never heard the "saying", but I found this:

Recently Apeq bought Wesley Snipes' straight to video movie 7 seconds. He told me that there was this scene where the Romanian thug trying to convey a joke to Snipes. It goes something like this.


R.T : You know. There is an old Romanian saying. It says that you don't blame the baker, if it's the butcher who bakes the bread.
Snipes : What it is supposed to mean?
R.T : It means you're fucked. *laughing*
Selected response from:

Brie Vernier
Germany
Local time: 22:28
Grading comment
Thanks a lot everyone!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +4for what it's worth ...
Brie Vernier
3 +4don't blame a whole profession if ...Refugio
5don't blame s.o if s.o else, without consulting him, does his job the wrong way
Babelworth
4Use competent people if you want good results.
Mwananchi
2 +2Explanation of example below
conejo


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
for what it's worth ...


Explanation:
I've never heard the "saying", but I found this:

Recently Apeq bought Wesley Snipes' straight to video movie 7 seconds. He told me that there was this scene where the Romanian thug trying to convey a joke to Snipes. It goes something like this.


R.T : You know. There is an old Romanian saying. It says that you don't blame the baker, if it's the butcher who bakes the bread.
Snipes : What it is supposed to mean?
R.T : It means you're fucked. *laughing*



    Reference: http://www.futurekl.com/social/2005_07_01_archives.html
Brie Vernier
Germany
Local time: 22:28
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks a lot everyone!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Clauwolf: completely (perfect):))))
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Clauwolf

agree  Cristina Chaplin: i am Romanian but I never heard the saying ... nevertheless, the explanation is right :)
56 mins
  -> Thanks, Awana -- I suspect it was made up for the movie : )

agree  Rebecca Barath: Good thing to know....:)
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rebecca -- you just never know when it might come in handy!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
22 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marju
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Explanation of example below


Explanation:
I am not sure exactly what it means either, but it came up in the movie "The Saint" (Val Kilmer), as well. An international thief had stolen an energy formula for a Russian oil tycoon. After delivering the formula, however, the oil tycoon claimed that the formula didn't work, and refused to pay. The thief replied, "I'm not the baker. Don't make me the butcher," which I believe is referring to this proverb.

I think that in this instance, what he was trying to say was that he didn't come up with the formula, so he has no idea whether it works or not... I think he was trying to say, "You didn't ask me to steal a formula that works--my job was to steal the formula. If you are asking me to make it work, you are asking the butcher to bake bread."

Hope this helps some tiny bit...

conejo
United States
Local time: 15:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Rusinterp
7 hrs
  -> Thanks.
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
don't blame a whole profession if ...


Explanation:
someone outside the profession tries to do its work that needs specialized training to do?

Actually, I don't think it is that common an expression in English, I believe it is a Romanian proverb.



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Note added at 24 mins (2006-02-09 20:03:57 GMT)
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Cobbler, stick to your last.

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Note added at 27 mins (2006-02-09 20:07:01 GMT)
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MEDDLERS often get chided with the words ‘stick to your last’ or, "a cobbler should stick to his last". A Greek artist called Apelles, who lived in the time of Alexander the Great, once made mistake in his drawing of a shoe. A shoemaker drew attention to this error. The artist bowed to the shoemaker’s expertise and made amends. But the shoemaker got bold enough to suggest changes in the legs of the subject in the painting. This Apelles could not digest. So he rebuked the cobbler. ‘Stick to your last’, the last being the cobbler’s block or artificial foot used for making or repairing shoes. A highly obscure word, ultracrepidarian, going beyond one’s own ability or area, comes from this episode as well. This word is derived from the Latin ultra crepidam, meaning ‘beyond the cobbler’s last’.

Refugio
Local time: 13:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Veronica Prpic Uhing
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  Seema Ugrankar
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Rusinterp
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alexander

agree  Alfredo Tutino: crepida (ae), however, just means "sandal" - just complete your classical reference... :-) The amusing part is that this Latin saying must have originally been uttered in Greek... (Apelles was a Greek painter...)
16 hrs
  -> Still, I love ultracrepidarian. Don't you think it sometimes applies to us translators? :~}
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
don't blame s.o if s.o else, without consulting him, does his job the wrong way


Explanation:
my point

Babelworth
Congo, Democratic Republic
Local time: 22:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Use competent people if you want good results.


Explanation:
Hire the right person for the job or live to regret it.

Mwananchi
Kenya
Local time: 00:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SwahiliSwahili
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (3): Javier Herrera, Refugio, conejo


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Changes made by editors
Feb 9, 2006 - Changes made by conejo:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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