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technical-economical employee

English translation: I have never heard of "technical-economical employee"

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16:14 Feb 14, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
English term or phrase: technical-economical employee
Has this phrase any meaning or just nonsense?
Is better to use white-collar worker?
Thank you in advance. :-)
Jan Kolbaba
Czech Republic
Local time: 07:01
English translation:I have never heard of "technical-economical employee"
Explanation:
This phrase has no meaning for me. It just makes me think, "What??"

I am not sure what you are trying to express with this phrase.
Merriam-Webster definition of "white-collar":
belonging or relating to a population segment or class made up of salaried employees (as teachers, sales persons, office workers, civil servants) whose duties permit the wearing of street clothes and call for well-groomed appearance -- compare BLUE-COLLAR
2 : of, relating to, characteristic of, or restricted to individuals of the white-collar segment or of a corresponding socioeconomic level <white-collar housing> <white-collar crime>

Definition of "blue-collar":
belonging or relating to a broad class of wage earners whose duties call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing <warehousemen, longshoremen, farmers, miners, mechanics, construction workers, and other blue-collar workers --

Again, there may be some other better translation, depending on what you want to say.
I hope this helps!
Selected response from:

conejo
United States
Local time: 00:01
Grading comment
Thank you.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2I have never heard of "technical-economical employee"
conejo
4an employee shouldn't be either
Mikhail Kropotov
3specialist in engineering economics
jccantrell


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
I have never heard of "technical-economical employee"


Explanation:
This phrase has no meaning for me. It just makes me think, "What??"

I am not sure what you are trying to express with this phrase.
Merriam-Webster definition of "white-collar":
belonging or relating to a population segment or class made up of salaried employees (as teachers, sales persons, office workers, civil servants) whose duties permit the wearing of street clothes and call for well-groomed appearance -- compare BLUE-COLLAR
2 : of, relating to, characteristic of, or restricted to individuals of the white-collar segment or of a corresponding socioeconomic level <white-collar housing> <white-collar crime>

Definition of "blue-collar":
belonging or relating to a broad class of wage earners whose duties call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing <warehousemen, longshoremen, farmers, miners, mechanics, construction workers, and other blue-collar workers --

Again, there may be some other better translation, depending on what you want to say.
I hope this helps!

conejo
United States
Local time: 00:01
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Knowles: It's a direct translation from Czech/Slovak, and your reaction is entirely natural!
6 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  RHELLER: technical = technician?
5 hrs
  -> Thanks
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
specialist in engineering economics


Explanation:
When I was in college, we had a course called 'Engineering Economics' which covered the cost of things and how it affected the chances of a project being completed.

Maybe you want to look into that area.

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 22:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 6
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
an employee shouldn't be either


Explanation:
Well, of course it's a good thing to be economical (meaning economizing), but it's really not good English - it's not English at all.

There are several ways to say what you want, one being "white-collar worker" with others being "highly qualified worker", "specialist",
"college-trained", etc. I think they would accomplish what you want, although each particular situation might call for a specific term.

It would help if you gave su a little bit more context (if this is from a text, anyway).

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Note added at 30 mins (2005-02-14 16:44:57 GMT)
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Neither \"technical employee\" not \"economical employee\" mean anything. Their combination is doubly meaningless.

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 08:01
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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